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Kathy Gyngell: The self-righteousness of our militant women doctors is striking

Back in February, I had the temerity to argue that the roots of the doctors' strike lay in the feminisation of the profession: that women doctors' demands for part-time work had created a ‘rights before responsibility’ culture in the National Health Service. This feminised cadre of junior doctors parading the streets on strike last month, taking ‘selfies’, virtue signalling hashtag placards thrust forward, displayed a narcissism and sense of entitlement that sat ill with their profession’s calling and duty of care.

All hell broke out – on the comment stream and in the Twittersphere. I’d hit a raw nerve.

From young anaesthetists who believed society’s gratitude to them should know no bounds, to aggressive ‘troll’ doctors with their barely veiled threats about my own health care should I need it, it was all flung at ‘despicable’ me. It would never have occurred to me that doctors spent so much of their time on social media.

Not that I was the only one to get it in the neck for suggesting that feminisation is to blame for the current crisis. Junior doctors in their thousands vented their outrage at Dominic Lawson’s Sunday Times column on the subject.

They cannot now be unaware that sympathy for their proposed strike escalation (a two day stoppage this week followed by an all-out daytime strike with no emergency cover on April 26-27) is running out as unease grows that the principle of ‘do no harm’ has yielded to ‘do no more overtime’. As Adam Boulton noted also in The Sunday Times: ‘Duty and responsibility as motivations for action have been replaced by what is forced out of individuals by the assertion of conflicting rights’.

He didn’t choose to spell out what these were. But the feminists' gender parity agenda is never far away. I am not talking about equal pay for equal work. I am talking about their demand for special treatment for less work – if you happen to be one of the women who graces the NHS with her part-time and uncommitted presence.

Yes, that’s exactly what part-time junior doctor Dr Rachel Clarke, representing the BMA’s militant case, demanded on Saturday morning’s Today programme.

Unless she were paid the same as her full-time working male colleagues for her part-time hours it would count as an act of discrimination. From this spurious moral high ground she shamelessly insisted on an entitlement to the same pay and progression throughout her career as her full-time working colleagues – since, in her inverted logic, 80 per cent of part-time doctors were women and they therefore must have gender parity. Because this is modern Britain, she added in a final reductio ad absurdum.

That her logic would condemn the NHS to becoming a totally part-time working service of women bothered her not one jot.

Far from counting her blessings – for her already flexible short hours, for keeping her hand in at work while bringing up children, and a regular pay cheque – she was intransigent about what modern Britain owed her. And her feminist colleagues are not about to take any prisoners either.

Criticise their ideology at your peril and they’ll demand a ‘safe space’ from offence – and from reality – by accusing you of discrimination and threatening worse.

Witness an outraged email I received last week from one female junior doctor. So horrified was she by my article (it damaged female professionals and the workforce as a whole, you should know) that she said I must submit to her challenging my views in a public forum – or else.

Should I not have ‘the fortitude to do so’ and if she ‘did not receive an adequate answer’ she’d publicly shame me – and the Conservative Party she mistakenly believes me to represent (no sir!) – about our ‘backwards views on gender’. She’d also seek legal advice on my being ‘in breach of discrimination legislation’.

Quaking I was not. As my colleague Laura said: “Wow - what a brittle bunch they are! Someone does not like what you say, they say I am going to sue you.” So bring it on Doctor, we say.

While at TCW we can laugh (we are not about to be cowed) it is not so funny for others.

Take the the double bind the Royal College of Paediatrics finds itself in. It is deeply ironic that it is children’s services that are the most threatened by the NHS’s feminised work culture where staff shortages, due to the rise in part-time working doctors, now threaten the closure of specialist children’s surgeries and wards.

But does the compliant and emasculated Royal College dare say enough is enough – that training so many female doctors who refuse to work full time with children is no longer viable? No. Instead they put these tender ladies' ‘safe space’ rights before the safety of the children in need and in their care. Instead, they ask the government – that means the taxpayer – to plug this gap to continue to feed the inefficiencies and negative ethos of this self-entitled female work culture.

 

(Image: Garry Knight)

Kathy Gyngell

  • RobertRetyred

    If a man had written what you have written, he wouldn’t be writing any more columns, ever!
    He would be with Tim Hunt in Japan, if still alive.

  • Mike Buchanan

    Excellent article. Has anyone else noticed that most of the leaders of the various medical Royal Colleges these days are feminists? They don’t even pretend to have the slightest concern about patients, whether male or female. Their prime concern is clearly female doctors.

    • GirlPower

      Why do you have to turn every issue into another anti-feminist rant?

      • Colonel Mustard

        Why do you have to turn every issue into a feminist rant?

    • Charlatans

      “various medical Royal Colleges these days are feminists?” and so many close Labour connections now in BMA, or has it always been thus?

  • gray cooper

    There is no place for being self-righteous as doctors and politicians are paid from tax.

  • The feminisation of the medical profession has lethal effects. Seven times as many resources are deployed to diagnose and treat cancer in women as it is in men.

    Men are being killed by the indifference of female doctors to their treatment needs.

    • dumlaut

      That cancer tidbit is interesting! Is there a specific type of cancer it focuses on?

      Oddly, statistically, I recall reading that men’s concerns and pains tend to be treated with more concern/taken more seriously by doctors than women’s concerns/pains. And I’m pretty sure for things like heart attacks, we generally know the signs for males, but the signs of female heart attacks are less publicized/not as a big a part of common knowledge. I guess some things swing towards women, others towards men.

  • The PrangWizard of England

    Well said. I too am sick to death of all the whining and threats which come from these militant ‘doctors’. And I’d like to know where they will go to get treatment should they or someone in their families or friends need it. Will they tell us truthfully? Special arrangements for them maybe?

  • Johnnydub

    The public sector was always about the employees not the customers. Now its only about the female employees.

    How the hell are Laurie Penny clones running the Government?

    • WFC

      Ah yes, Laurie Penny. Another “feminist” for whom it’s all about the money: http://youtu.be/oj9dA6E3fJw

      • GirlPower

        You seem obsessed with Ms. Penny.

        • WFC

          An observation doesn’t an obsession make.

        • Colonel Mustard

          You seem obsessed with anyone who does not share your extreme sexist misandrist psychobabble.

    • Colonel Mustard

      Because if anyone should dare publicly disagree with what they are peddling they would be hounded, “shamed”, forced to apologise and demanded to resign. Government ministers are terrified of the bullying tactics of the various militant single issue campaign groups and their fake charity backers whilst happy to complain about and legislate for “bullying” on social media. FUBAR.

      • Kingstonian

        Perhaps government ministers should spend less time on social media and realize that it is not the be all and end all of public opinion.

  • geo

    the vast majority of the feminists demands have been met. there is increasingly less and less for them to fight about. now its all about entitlement and their demands to be more than equal. I long ago switched off and my extremely go getter sister with 2 degrees + mba + a salary twice mine thinks they are now a bunch of whining parasites.

  • statechaos

    Shouldn’t that be ‘are striking’?

    • Paul Jackson

      No points to you. ‘Striking’ here refers to their self-righteousness.The author is making a pun.

    • Stephen T

      The subject of the sentence is ‘The self righteous of . . . “. It’s not ‘doctors’, so the author is correct.

  • Paul Jackson

    Great article and while we’re at it we shouldn’t ignore the other elephant in the room and that is the fact that women are also the heaviest users of NHS resources and are far more likely than men to seek medical attention for trivial ailments.
    Perhaps the introduction of a consultation fee would curb such a waste of resources.

  • Weary&Wary

    “Yes, that’s exactly what part-time junior doctor Dr Rachel Clarke, representing the BMA’s militant case, demanded on Saturday morning’s Today programme.”

    Source:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b075lx0c
    from
    19:30

    • Paul Jackson

      Yes. I notice that from the very start she tried to misrepresent the situation, by saying that the new contract would disadvantage her relative to male doctors, when in fact it would disadvantage her relative to full-time doctors (i.e. the ones who actually pull their weight), whether they are male or female.

  • derek

    Equality has joined diversity and racism on my list of words that “trigger” my WTF reflex.

  • Elizabeth Smith

    Large numbers of part time women = failing public service.
    The NHS is the one that can kill you, but the CPS is also as bad.
    Prof Merrian Thomas was hounded out of his job for saying part time women were bad news, but in Pakistan they are now refusing to train female doctors because many of them will never work and they are not prepared to expend limited resources on them; while in Russia feminisation has apparently massively reduced the status of the medical profession.

    • klm

      Back in the 80’s, my father (who reviewed applications for medical school) observed that growing numbers of women medical doctors was going to be a problem. Women tended to work fewer hours than men (in their given profession) over the course of their career. Yet they were taking valuable (and limited) spots in medical school. Especially given the introduction of quotas, women were given spaces in each incoming class of medical students that might have gone to men who were at least as qualified as these women, but who would more likely spend more time working and developing their skills/knowledge. In the end, this leads to a shortage of doctors and/or an overall reduced amount of office time available to patients. The general public suffers.

    • Stephen T

      In Pakistan 70% of trainee doctors are women, but only 23% of registered doctors are women. Why the massive discrepancy? Being a doctor is a status symbol and makes the woman much more eligible. It’s estimated that 50% of women doctors never practice. What a shocking waste of money and expertise.

  • twinscrew

    I have said before elsewhere that these militants should be sacked as Reagan did with the air traffic control strikers in the States, offer them a take the contract or leave scenario, for doubters of this action I would say “where else are they going to earn a living” they can’t all work in Australia, you will soon see a realisation that the World does not owe you a living.
    Stand by for incoming,

    • CRM_114

      The UK is not in a position,as Reagan was, to keep a near full service going whilst a new batch are trained or recruited.
      And I don’t think there would be a lot of trouble for those doctors to all get jobs abroad, but it would certainly force them to make that choice.
      But the principle is fine.

      • lucysdad01

        They would have great difficulty in getting jobs abroad as thoase countries that have good training programmes all have their own trainee’s to accomodate first and they would have to pay to take the exams to fulfill that countries requirements.

        • CRM_114

          Not so.
          Take a look at, for example, Australia’s current shortage occupations list – just about every NHS job there!
          http://www.nwivisas.com/nwi-blog/australia/australian-skilled-occupation-list-2015-%E2%80%93-2016-published/

          • lucysdad01

            You try getting in and they also have a population about 20% of the UK. Remember they also have choice and these day people spouting off on social media etc leave themselves wide open to I’m not employing you no matter how good you say you are.

          • CRM_114

            A cousin runs a medical office in WA, he’d sign up 2 brits immediately. Another cousin and myself are in another Commonwealth country, When I left, another of my staff left the same day for New Zealand. It you meet the criteria (and NHS staff do), they make it very easy. In fact, it’s really eye-opening. One is always expecting delays or stupid rules or mistakes after experience with UK Government admin but….everything works!
            You do make a good point about social media though.

  • Colonel Mustard

    Just how many of these militant doctors are members of or activists for the Labour party or other extreme left wing parties? Their stance is looking increasingly like opposition politics.

    • klm

      It’s hard to tell with these people. Sometimes, as in the case of these public demonstrations/strikes, professional agitators are brought in to help organize and also to increase the numbers demonstrating – looks better to have massive numbers of people out when the MSM comes to cover the story. These agitator types see politics in everything, and have a talent for sniffing out opportunities to make yet another power grab. But you probably also have doctors who are activists as well, and who are taking advantage of the current situation in order to gain more favorable working conditions (for them). All this seems to leave out the interests of the patients, though.

  • Mrs Crewe

    What the Drs of each gender (or none) should try and remember is, the profession you work in does not make you special, its the way you do your job that matters. And there are precious few exceptional Drs about these days.

  • corinium

    My father is currently in a nursing home requiring 24/7 care, and has been either there or in hospital for over 3 months now. In that time my mother has had to deal with a series of doctors (both hospital and GPs) who have been unfailingly self interested and uncaring about the needs of the patient. One GP told my mother ‘I’m only contracted to deal with patients until 6:30pm, I’m not coming out to visit a patient now (it was about 6pm), you’ll have to phone Out of Hours and deal with them’. My mother was in tears in front of one hospital doctor begging him to reduce my father’s insulin injection dose as it was far too high (my mother is a trained nurse and has had 40 years experience dealing with my father’s diabetic condition) and he just said ‘I don’t consider that suitable’ and walked off. The whole experience has made me despise the modern medical profession as arrogant self interested @rseholes.

    My Grandfather was a GP from the 30s through to the 70s, he would be turning in his grave to see what the medical ‘profession’ has become – a series of greedy self-interested narcissists who appear to get a kick out of ordering people around. He ran a GP practise with one other doctor, at any time either he or his partner were ‘on call’, day or night. Being called at inconvenient hours to attend a patient was a constant issue, but that was what he’d become a doctor for, to help people who needed assistance. It was a calling not a means to make money. And he provided that service for 40 years.

    Modern so-called ‘doctors’ should be ashamed to even call themselves doctors when one looks at what level of lifetime commitment that meant in the past.

    • CRM_114

      It would be worth reflecting on what happened to drive out all the good doctors (and teachers, and Army officers, etc) that used to be in public service.

      • Colonel Mustard

        The Long March through the institutions and Common Purpose, probably.

    • Stephen T

      Corinium, they must have consent for your father’s treatment. Either your father gave it, which he can withdraw, or someone did. Tell the arrogant doctor you will make a formal complaint if he refuses to listen to your father or his representative. Treatment without consent is assault.

      I once took my grandma out of a terrible nursing home. A senior nurse told me I couldn’t take my grandma out of the hellhole she’d been put in. I knew the law and she quickly backed off. I told her that interference from her constituted ‘unlawful detention’. If I’d just accepted her authority my gran’s last years would have been miserable. Make a fuss and involve a patient’s organisation. Best wishes.

      • corinium

        I did say exactly that to my mother, as she has Power of Attorney over my Father’s affairs. But she was afraid that if she made a fuss the staff might in some way mistreat (or more likely ignore) my father when he needed help. Thats the depths to which the NHS and the medical profession has sunk – people being afraid to demand that so called professionals act correctly, for fear of what they might do when one’s back is turned.

        Fortunately now he is in a new nursing home and the staff are better there, and we have managed to finally get the level of medication to a better level. Its still been a battle, the control freak GPs hate deferring to anyone else’s judgement, wounded pride I assume.

        • Stephen T

          Then you say it and just get your mum to agree. Mistreating patients is far less likely when patients have relatives willing to complain. Bad treatment more commonly goes to the compliant and helpless.

    • Busy Mum

      It’s a similar situation with MP’s, teachers, police, clergy and even ‘parents’; what used to be seen as a vocation has become a career. Now it’s all about what these occupations can do for you, rather than what you can do for others.

  • Kenneth

    There is nothing wrong with people using their solidarity to obtain better conditions.

    Doctors have made a profit from treating the sick for centuries. They should be free to try to maximise that profit just as we should be free to sack them.

  • CRM_114

    Feminised education, feminised medicine.
    Just imagine how safe the UK will be once you’ve feminised the infantry too!

    • GirlPower

      Women make up 60% of University graduates.

      Girls out-perform boys at GCSEs and A-levels.

      Now explain why “feminisation” is a bad thing.

      • AKM

        And yet they still only earn 75 to 80% of what men earn on average (or whatever the current percentage is). The conclusion must be that university degrees, GCSEs and A-levels don’t actually help prepare them to be useful in the real world.

      • Adaadat

        I’m sorry, but that is a non-sequitor.

        The complaint refers to the quality of the provision of education and healthcare, not the numbers.

      • CRM_114

        1. The qualifications system has been biased towards methods which suit girls, and removes initiative from teaching and learning methods. This suits female staff, but is bad for both able girls as well as boys, but girls are generally more prepared to put up with it. Thus, girls get higher grades, but of qualifications that have less worth in the real world.

        2. Driving men out of the profession severely impacts STEM subjects. Having more female staff isn’t helpful if they are all English teachers instead of Maths teachers. My experience of female STEM staff is that there are fewer of high calibre than male staff, and nowhere near enough to replace the men who have left. This impacts girl students as well as boys.

        3. The UK lacks enough STEM graduates; that this has gone hand in hand with an increasing proportion of females at University is quite noticeable. With respect, there is no point having 230 female humanities graduates when you need 230 nuclear engineers (of any gender), as the Government and the country are currently discovering with Hinkley ‘C’.

      • Stephen T

        Because your version of feminism isn’t about equality. If the statistics you quote were in favour of men, you’d demand action.

        • klm

          Not only that, but I fear this is done at the expense of men and boys. Girls doing well is one thing, but when boys are now lagging (and have been for a while now), then that’s a problem.

      • Paul Jackson

        That is the result of feminisation of the education system with lowered standards across the board. The UK is 23rd in international rankings for literacy and 25th for numeracy.

  • MacOisdealbh

    This kind of attitude and associated demands were all predicted and predictable. This is what the feminization of the professions brings. These people have been trained in our universities to think this way. Feminists don’t want equal rights for women they want special rights for women. It has been that way from the beginning and it will not end until we get the vipers in the women’s and gender studies department out of our universities.

    • GirlPower

      There still aren’t enough women in the top jobs.

      We need more female consultant doctors and surgeons.

      • miniminor

        Part time consultants? Part time surgeons?

        • GirlPower

          If we had free universal childcare, maybe they wouldn’t need to work part-time.

          • miniminor

            Who would provide this universal childcare? Women working part-time? And who would work to pay for it? Men?

          • Stephen T

            Most women want to work part time when they have children. This fact is incomprehensible to a tiny minority of super ambitious women.

          • Ridcully

            If the minimum wage was raised to £100 per hour, we could all be rich

          • sungeipatani

            There is no such thing as free universal childcare. It is just that the tax payer pays for it rather than the parents.

          • WFC

            We can have free universal childcare when people are willing to provide universal childcare for free.

            You volunteering?

        • Helen Smith

          I have no issue with part time doctors and consultants, the NHS may pay less NI contributions this way, but, if the tax payer pays for the training then a minimum number of hours work in the NHS must be done to justify that expense, and pay must be on a pro rats basis.

      • Colonel Mustard

        And more new kitchens!

      • Stu Gre

        Oh give it a rest. Equality of opportunity and NOT equality of outcome. There are plenty of excellent consultants/surgeons who are women so the opportunity exists. Sadly half the current NHS crop would rather work part time and/or 60% of the hours their male counterparts work. Hence they don’t tend to progress to the top positions.

  • warmingmyth

    A lot of those commenting here have focused on the short comings of the modern medical professional, just as the writer of the article has focused on feminism and the consequences of having a part time female work force. However valid the points being made, for clarity of understanding they should be viewed as a separate issue to the rights or wrongs of the proposed government contract for junior doctors.
    To emphasize the point the fact that the leadership of Unison is composed of people who might be thought to have questionable political ideas and ways of working does not necessarily mean that employers negotiating with them are always in the right.
    The real question is are Jeremy Hunts’ proposals particularly about how much individual health care trusts can be relied upon not to exploit their workforce, right or wrong.
    Quite apart from this latest dispute, there is undoubtedly a crisis in the health service with many hospitals and GP practices unable to recruit.
    The other point that many of those commenting should consider is whether or not they agree or disagree with strike action, is what is their view of doctors emigrating to other countries?

    • Mrs Crewe

      ‘Exploit their workforce’? No bias there. I would like to know if you think Drs should be the only front line staff in the NHS where Saturday is not a normal day.

      • warmingmyth

        I take it that you are a Conservative activist and as I do not deal in sound bites unrelated to substance we have no basis for dialogue.

        • Mrs Crewe

          Well you take it wrong, I’m not even a member of any party. I suspect you are indulging in a bit of transference. If you want a back story I’m the daughter of a Consultant Surgeon who worked far more hours for far less money. I trained as a nurse and have witnessed and been the victim of appaling medicine from both medical and nursing professions. I have seen first hand the hard core minority of staff who are chronically bone idol festering a culture of fake hard done byness encouraged by increasingly far left unions. Now I’m a Senior Auditor in a local authority and due to multi partnership delivered projects I audit the NHS and what I’ve seen would turn even the hardest of hard liner NHS worshippers stop and think.
          So this time your assumptions has made an ass out of you but not me.

          • warmingmyth

            Thank you — the Conservative activist was only a guess but what you have revealed is that you are very much part of NHS administration so that one can hardly expect you to be sympathetic to the idea of not trusting hospital management.
            As an aside, Saturday working and having no effective means of stopping exploitation are two separate issues. Something that I suspect you already know but about which you would wish to confuse those that do not know.

          • Mrs Crewe

            You are so funny NHS administration! I spend my time assessing and evaluating the administration, effectiveness or rather lack of it of controls etc. Clearly you have no clue what a local authority auditor does. As a very lowly local govt worker I can assure you that my colleagues and I are as far away from exploitation as you can get. I have very good wages, an excellent pension and to die for terms and conditions. And they are even better in the public sector and NHS. I’ve worked in the public, private and voluntary sectors, and can say with absolute certainty that no one in public sector has any genuine cause to strike, other than to give publicity to the power hungry corrupt and venal unions.

  • CRM_114

    When in the military, I used to work about 85 hours a week. When I switched to teaching, I worked about ….85 hours a week (force of habit 😉 ).
    Have a guess at whether I am male or female?
    To me, it wasn’t really work, I enjoyed it. Then the world filled up with elf’n’safety, targets, human resources, and assorted other bolleaux. Did output improve? Did it f#ck. I reckon my productivity dropped by about 30%. I stopped doing 7 extra-curricular activities, leaving a big fat zero.
    I’m told my replacements have dropped to less than half the A level students, and worse results (even though the exams get easier every year). They do 1 of those 7 activities, badly.
    Every one I started each job with has now also left the profession early (all male). Some of them were better than me.
    The UK is haemorrhaging its best people, essentially because it treats them in exactly the same way as it treats the poorly-performing, dodgy characters, in the so-called quest for equality. It denies them judgement, latitude, and respect. In short, it p!sses them off. We leave. You lose.

  • RavenRandom

    The NHS has become a deity in Britain, to speak ill of it is apostasy. Any debate in Britain can be derailed by two phrases “But what about the NHS?” and “Won’t nobody think of the children?” Both of these comments can be relied upon to replace reason with emotion and lead to dumb short-term decisions.

    • Stephen T

      Our beloved NHS is totally wrong about diet, diabetes, cholesterol and, probably, cancer. Except for emergency care, we might be better off if they stayed at home.

      • GirlPower

        OK, so the scientists, academics and experts have all got it wrong – but you, alone, possess the truth?

        Anything else you want to enlighten us about?

        Climate change? The Moon landings? The whereabouts of Elvis?

        • Stephen T

          The ‘truth’ I possess comes from reading science and is widely known in each field. For example, three separate meta-analysis, including by Harvard and Cambridge Universities have found that fat, saturated fat and cholesterol have nothing to do with heart disease. Indeed, according to World Health Organisation figures, the twenty countries with the highest rates of cholesterol are also the twenty countries with the lowest rates of heart disease. NHS cardiologist Aseem Malhotra is prominent in this area, but there are many others.
          I could provide similar evidence for diabetes and diet, but your mind is far too small to make it worthwhile.

    • GirlPower

      Here’s a quick history lesson for you.

      Socialism gave us an end to child labour, an end to appalling factory conditions, old age pensions, healthcare for the poor, the minimum wage and maternity leave.

      The free market gave us slavery and the workhouse, with single mothers, children and the “economically unproductive” elderly and disabled dying amidst their own filth on the streets.

      State intervention gave us the Welfare State, which provided a basic level of support and care for those who had fallen on hard times.

      The Tories and Ukip want to dismantle the Welfare State, thus taking us back to the Victorian era.

      • Sungei Patani

        Socialist countries have to build a wall round them to keep people in. Capitalist countries have to build a fence around them to keep people out.

        • GirlPower

          No, it’s dictatorships who build walls.

          Thousands of people flocked to Attlee’s socialist Britain in the late 1940s.

          Millions of people are flocking to Obama’s social-democratic America now. The same for the Scandinavian countries which have embraced social democracy.

          • Pauly

            You mean for example Sweden where the socialists have encouraged mass immigration to the extent that women can’t walk out alone at night without fear and Germany where gender-segregated railway carriages are soon to be introduced?

          • sungeipatani

            Are you trying to tell me that the USA is not a capitalist country? Social Democracy is not Socialism and the Scandinavian countries are capitalist. Don’t confuse capitalism, an economic system with Social Democracy, a political system.

            Attlee’s socialist paradise was such a hit with the British people that they voted him out of office in 1951 and there was not another Labour government until 1964.

          • Stephen T

            Remind us who built the Berlin wall to keep its people in?

      • RavenRandom

        Yes of course. The modern world and the computer you’re writing on was all the result of yak farmers in a commune.

        • GirlPower

          Einstein was a socialist.

          • AKM

            Einstein was a great physicist but a rather poor economist. His being a socialist can be put in the same category as Newton’s involvement in alchemy.

          • GnosticBrian

            So was Adolf Hitler for that matter: “We are socialists, we are enemies of today’s capitalistic economic system for the exploitation of the economically weak, with its unfair salaries, with its unseemly evaluation of a human being according to wealth and property instead of responsibility and performance, and we are all determined to destroy this system under all conditions.” – quoted in John Toland, “Adolf Hitler”, p224

          • and a man!

      • AKM

        Actually it’s capitalism that generated the wealth that allowed us to end child labour, improve factory conditions and provide for old age pensions.

        It is Science that improved healthcare for everyone, it’s the wealth created by capitalism that allowed the poor to receive it.

        Minimum wages make life worse for the poor by making it more difficult to get their feet on the first rung of the social ladder. They destroy social mobility and make it more difficult to escape poverty.

        Slavery existed throughout history until Christianity ended it in Europe and the abolitionists who campaigned to end the slave trade from Africa to America. It had nothing to do with Socialism or the free market.

        The Workhouses were brought about by the 1834 Poor Law. It was an early attempt at providing a social safety net. The entire point of the workhouses was to get people off the streets.

        State intervention has damaged wealth creation in the UK and has made us all poorer as the result, with the possible exception of the parasites who find ways to latch onto the taxpayers’ teat.

        • Colkitto03

          Great post!

        • Mez

          Excellent post, and most of that was managed on low/no tax system basis, including the first pension provision

      • Andy

        Oh do put a sock in it – or in your case a pair of tights.
        Child Labour was ended NOT by Socialism, but by the actions of early 19th Century Industrialists. People like the Bradford Mill Owner John Wood, of whom you have never heard. He got the 10 Hour Bill passed, which lead to much social legislation in the Victorian Era.
        And you glorious Labour Party is turning rapidly into the Fascist Labour Party with the tolerance of Anti-Semitism. But hating Jews has always been big on the Left.

      • GnosticBrian

        And what were the views of that great Socialist, founder of the Welfare State, William Beveridge?

        This is what Beveridge advocated be done about the “feeble-minded”: “They must be acknowledged dependents of the State…but with complete and permanent loss of all civil rights – including not only the franchise but civil freedom and fatherhood”.

      • Stephen T

        History or fantasy? You don’t seem to know the difference. Child labour was outlawed before most people had heard of socialism. It played its part, but you ignore all the progress of reformers who were liberal, conservative and of no party.
        Didn’t slavery in the west end two centuries ago? Thousands of British sailors died suppressing it and are buried on the west African coast. This is just ugly, grievance politics and it takes us nowhere.

  • Roderick antifemnasty

    When they say woman and children they mean WOMAN and then what ever. But not men.

  • GirlPower

    Over 80% of NHS workers are female.

    No wonder the misogynists hate it.

    A lot of these sexist throwbacks still can’t get their chauvinistic heads round the notion that women can have a career outside the home.

    Deep down, they would rather we all returned to being docile, submissive, sweet 1950s housewives doing our husbands’ domestic chores and having dinner on the table when they got home from the office.

    Deep down, they are uncomfortable with the notion of women being independent and having ambitions outside the home.

    Maybe they feel intimidated by the thought of competing against women in the workplace?

    If the NHS workforce were 80% male, we’d be forever hearing stories about how great it is and how it needs more investment.

    • miniminor

      Which misogynists are you referring to, or is this just another sweeping generalisation?

      • GirlPower

        Our society is permeated with misogyny. Not noticing this is part of white male privilege. If you were female, you’d be only all too aware. Check out the EverydaySexism Project for starters.

        • Stephen T

          I wonder when my white male privilege will arrive? It just seems to have been very long hours in dirty, dangerous jobs to look after a wife and children. You’ve picked up all the university gobbledegook, but not a bit of sense. I think you’ve benefitted from vastly greater ‘privilege’ than I’ve ever seen.

          • Don’t waste your energy mate, obviously just another feminist ‘educated’ beyond the limits of her own intelligence..

          • Phil R

            We need to challenge as her lunacy is increasingly mainstream.

            Many of the CP would nod their heads approvingly. For Labour and LD her “logic” is beyond dispute.

        • Colonel Mustard

          You are permeated with misandry and I have no intention to check out American feminine hysteria.

          • klm

            I have seen the website “Everyday Sexism”. Totally absurd.

        • miniminor

          You say, in reply to my comment, “if you were female”. Let me give you a clue. I have just finished cooking supper (smoked haddock, mashed potato and peas, followed by blackcurrant cheesecake) for my partner who, exhausted by an hour playing Nintendo games, has been relaxing watching television. I can’t claim much credit for the supper, though, as the constituents came from Lidl and Iceland. I know this, because I did the shopping, during which time my partner hoovered and dusted. How does that fit your world view? Are you sure I’m not a woman?
          I guess you believe that all women are good, kind and caring, sadly put upon by men who are all beastly rotters who trick girls into getting pregnant. I guess you fell under the spell of some Marxist lecturer at University, read a book on Social History, and suddenly saw the light. Of course I could be wrong; maybe you are an enlightened man posting under a pseudonym. You are wasting your time, though. You really should be in the entertainment business

          • klm

            I cooked dinner after running some downed branches through the woodchipper, while my spouse hung out some laundry and made me a martini! Who is who? 😉

            Seriously, though, I am a woman and I don’t notice misogyny everywhere in society. But maybe that’s just because I’m not actively looking for it.

        • CRM_114

          I have spent a long time working in mostly female establishments, and can assure you that everyday sexism occurs the other way too – including: No changing or showering facilities for male staff despite a work requirement to change (have to use the toilets, then use the disabled shower in another building); men having to wear jacket & tie whilst women get away with T shirt & jeans; Expectation that all staff help each other with computer/technology problems which means, in practice, two male staff get all the ‘the printer won’t work’s from all the female staff.

        • Johnnymcevoy

          Aah feckov do.

        • Johnnymcevoy

          You’d be nice if you weren’t so chippy. Maybe.

    • Colonel Mustard

      Looks like Fabian_Solutions is back via Chicago with another sockpuppet troll name.

      Why do fanatical American hopey-changey socialists concern themselves so much with what is discussed on British conservative websites?

      And “GirlPower” and Clinton? Laughable. Her power is not derived from being a “girl”. It is the last descriptor for the nature of that politician and her considerable baggage.

      Feminists:-

      “Whine, whine, treat me the same! But I’m a girl so treat me special too! Whine, whine!”

      • Paul Jackson

        LOL! I think that you’re right. She should check out the website of Kathleen Willey who is giving a daily expose of Hitlery’s ‘Girl Power’.

      • WFC

        Definitely sounds like Fabie Baby, doesn’t it?

        Must be killing her to have to ration the bold commentary.

    • CRM_114

      I feel you are missing the point. Whilst misogyny is still around, there are clearly areas where it has been replaced by androgyny, which is equally wrong.
      Furthermore, the performance of the feminised professions is the point being raised. Education, and now medicine, are failing to deliver either the standards or productivity of the previously male-dominated eras. Better childcare for workers is a must, but the key point I’ve noticed is that women do not work as many extra hours as men. Furthermore, the standards are dropping because the ability to criticise staff is being removed or diluted. It is ridiculously difficult these days to make critical comments. One is forced into arranged interviews, staged procedures and endless paperwork for female staff for what used to be done with a quick chat over a cuppa and a few suggestions for improvement for male staff. Generalising, women are scared to death of losing their jobs, don’t take chances (i.e. opportunities), want everything set in Policy,and won’t listen to criticism. As a result performance drops to the point of collapse. The UK is 28th in the latest round of PISA tests for schools, but used to have the best education in the World.
      It is, in fact, women in general who are scared of competition. The good ones aren’t, but the majority are, and are quite content to drag everyone else down to their level to preserve their job security.

    • Stephen T

      You’re good at sweeping statements, but I don’t think you know anything about men and very little about what most women want.

      • Johnnymcevoy

        She knows that men can’t bear her. But not why.

    • Nick

      You are clearly in favour of sexism since men can’t get a job in the sexist NHS

    • The Patriarchy

      Is this the Fabian dissolution idiot again?

      Last time it had got a first from Oxford, but somehow finished up teaching in a dead end state school. I wonder what fantasies we will be treated to this time.

    • Bogbrush

      No, what we’d rather you do is commit to doing the full job, without the compromises and get-outs that marks some women as inferior contributors to their male colleagues.

      Oh, and hello again Kate, you’ve not been on here for a bit. Nice to see you back.

    • Johnnymcevoy

      Who are ‘the misogynists’?
      .
      And why are you licking Killary’s a£53 the whole time?

  • GirlPower

    Many women are still forced to work part-time because the Government still won’t provide free universal childcare, Sweden-style.

    Investing in free State-run nurseries for all children, from the first year of life, would allow more women to work and contribute to the economy.

    Moreover, research has shown that men are still failing to pull their weight with the housework.

    75% of household chores are still done by women. In 2016!

    If males got off their lazy a*ses and helped more at home, women would have more time to go out to work.

    • AKM

      Why should I have to pay for their “free” state-run nursery?

      • Needs2Cash

        As I read it “because we cannot get the fathers of our kids to do their fair share of the parenting”.

      • fitzfitz

        Because you don’t stand up and shout : STOP.

    • Kenneth

      I don’t think it is good for pre-school children to spend too much time away from their families.

      What Sweden does is up to them but I can’t help thinking that encouraging families to be apart (by having taxpayer funded nurseries) is stoking up future problems.

    • Stephen T

      I wonder if you’d like to do the work of a typical, lazy man in the building industry, down sewers, in engineering or up an electricity pylon in all weathers? I don’t think so. These lazy men might reasonably expect their largely part-time working wives to pick up most of the house work. Their wives certainly wouldn’t swap places. The privileged sisters only demand the clean, safe, warm and well-paid jobs.

      Are you really so deluded that you think most women with children are fighting to do more hours at work?

    • Indoctrinate all children of working mothers earlier? That would indeed be spreading your misery. More State-raised motherless and fatherless children ought to make all inept bureaucracy bulletproof. Did you learn that in school? Or was it in the nursery?

    • PierrePendre

      Women doctors with children are presumably for the most part married to high earning husbands. Why comfortable two-salaried families should be subsidised with free child care which they can well afford to pay for is an example of the greedy demand for free stuff which has overwhelmed even supposedly well-educated, middle,class people.

      Benefits and entitements are intended to help those in want, not those who are already well off and want to hang on to their money rather take responsibility for the choices they made voluntarily.

      Allowing women to work part time is already a huge concession which damages the efficiency of the fields in which they work – easily manipulated pubic sector, of course – as well as costing the overall economy billions. Too much, yet again, is never enough.

      From each according to his abiities, too each according to his needs used to be the idealists’ battle cry. Female junior doctors – but not only them – have got it exactly the wrong way round.

    • Paul Jackson

      You really are a clown aren’t you?Holding Sweden up as an example. That country is fast approaching bankruptcy as well as being over-run by hoards of immigrants

      • Johnnymcevoy

        What are the immigrants hoarding? Do tell.

    • WFC

      Is that you, Fabie Baby? New moniker for the new year?

      What do you think of the Guardianograph’s new style changes after you … cough … left to pursue other interests?

      • Johnnymcevoy

        Yes it is. She loves Killary to bits.

        • WFC

          Unlike the original “Moniker”:-)

    • The Patriarchy

      Women should look after their own children, or not breed. Whoever is not the bread winner should be doing the bulk of the household chores.

      That is what fair means.

      • fitzfitz

        Nannies in London demand a car now – easily affordable by slackers who manipulate the NHS to their own ends…

    • UKCitizen

      You are making a rather sexist assumption that they have husbands. The likelihood is that they have opted for the state to be the other parent and therefore expect it to pay for everything.
      Also a husband is a choice that they have made. If they have decided to marry an Alpha type like themselves or a lazy bad boy! then they only have themselves to blame.
      In my experience Alpha girls are complete control freaks and there husbands tend to give up doing stuff because it is never done the way they want it anyway.

      • CRM_114

        ..and “the State” includes, via taxation, all the men who have decided not to have children.
        I object strongly enough to this that I (legally) no longer pay UK taxes.

    • CRM_114

      “research shows”…you mean, they asked a few women who does the housework.
      Define ‘housework’ – one person’s ‘housework’ is another person’s ‘unnecessary fussing’.
      How often do houses need dusting?

  • Stephen T

    If Dr Rachel Clarke wants full time pay for part time work, why wouldn’t the men all go part time?

    • Andy

      The sexist c*w. Why should men be treated as second-class citizens ????

    • fitzfitz

      Because they are not infantalised, not all feminised…

  • Kenneth

    The ‘militant women’ problem is a wider issue affecting mainly those who have gone onto higher education (in my opinion).

    Education = indoctrination.

    Those who have no – or only a few – educational/professional qualifications tend to be less affected and show more individualism and common sense. I admit this is a wild generalisation but it fits my experience.

    The indoctrination goes beyond the school/college/uni with the BBC and other like-minded media outlets continuing where the lecturers left off.

    The indoctrination then bleeds into institutions. The BBC is one example but they are growing: the legal profession; most large charities; the Metropolitan Police; the civil service; the Conservative Party etc

    Doctors are not immune, and since the ladies are particularly targeted, they are more affected than most.

    It sounds like a conspiracy theory but I don’t think it is. In fact, I wish it were a conspiracy as that would be easier to deal with. Instead it’s a contagious disease. Once enough people have the disease within a discreet unit, those without disease are seen as the odd ones out.

    To many of us these people seem out of sorts. Their language is odd and a lot of what they say is not logical. However, they understand one another and the BBC pushes the message out so more and more of us can join them.

    We need to support the NHS with an organised volunteer service. The whole NHS does not need to be full of profiteers. I don’t blame them for taking a profit from the sick. It has been done for centuries. However, if they go abroad life will go on without them. In fact, considering the life-shortening problems we have had in the NHS recently, more lives may go on without them.

  • Turdson Minor

    Dear Dr Clarke,
    What about starting a weight loss clinic instead of A&E? Your fat country needs you.

    • Phil R

      How about putting your height and weight on your tax form

      If you are over a certain BMI your NS contributions double, if you are the correct weight they halve.

  • Colkitto03

    I think that Kathy does a great job in calling out these people. What saddens me is that this vocal minority steals all the media attention. There is a silent majority of great female medical professionals in the UK that are not whinging cry babies.

    It’s the people that Kathy describes who ensure that only 7% of British people identify themselves as feminist. These same people are the reason that almost 1 in 5 women in the UK beleive the term “feminist” is an insult.

    • Kenneth

      We need plural media. Broadcast media still dominates despite the internet and broadcast media is dominated by the BBC, hence the disproportionate coverage. IMHO

    • Stephen T

      True. Most doctors are responsible and dedicated. I think quite a few doctors are upset by their younger, noisier and sillier colleagues. This dispute is about money.

      • EUman remains

        I agree with all you said except the last line. This really is not about money. Kathy G has called it absolutely right – an increasingly feminised (and feminist-influenced) junior cohort that does not want to work weekends. Of course, they will happily shop at Waitrose on a Sunday, where it is just a normal day for the workers. We expect supermarkets to open at the weekends, and we need a NHS that serves patients around the clock. Shameful, shameful behaviour that would have had Bevan and Attlee turning in their graves.

        • Stephen T

          In fairness hospital doctors already work some weekends, but get a substantially enhanced hourly rate for it. The new contract would reduce the weekend rate and incorporate it into basic pay.

        • SonofBoudica

          Supermarkets should either refuse to serve doctors at weekends, or charge them double.

        • Phil R

          “Of course, they will happily shop at Waitrose on a Sunday,”

          This is quite rightly double standards. The answer is that Waitrose should not be open on Sundays. Many of our competitor nations have a legislated rest day and those that do are much more successful as a result.

        • fitzfitz

          If these females were working late at Addenbrooks, for instance, they could browse the aisles of the ground floor Marks and Spencer food hall. It is price-upped for captive patients, of course, but the busy docs would negotiate special rates, of course…

      • fitzfitz

        Yet they are cowed into standing by as patients are placed second … as in academe, a truth told can derail a career . So – less truth.

      • Itsquitesimple

        It cannot be about money as the BMA contract proposal was cost-neutral . You are aware of that or are you intentionally misleading? Of course from the DoH perspective it is all about money.

        To move from a 5 day service to 7 day service requires an (2/7 [28.5%]) increase in funding if weekend funding is to match Monday-Friday at non-premium rates. If weekends are to be given any recognition, then that figure would be higher. Given that the deficits are already out of control, we know that is not going to happen. Indeed, getting the NHS efficient on Monday to Friday would be a good start.

        If Tesco medicine is the way forward for the DoH (despite all the evidence being that it is unpopular with the public), the impact on weekday services will be unpopular as clinical services are moved to weekends and evenings.

        • Stephen T

          The tone of your second sentence is ill judged, particularly as my comment is clearly supportive of doctors.

          I tend to agree with everything else you say, but you might need to grow up and accept that the public pays for this service and is entitled to ask questions and not merely fawn at your feet. The BMA has opposed every reform that’s effected doctors. This was put to Clare Gerada on ‘The Daily Politics’ a few weeks ago and she had no answer because it’s true.

  • EUman remains

    Manslaughter charges here we come. Patient death will turn the tide against them. So much for their sanctimonious ‘save the NHS’ placards (adorned with a loveheart, so primary school).

    • fitzfitz

      Unfortunately for the passive, public patient, infantalism goes with the sheeps’ marxist, feminised intent. The me, me, me thrust is utterly unprofessional, of course.

  • Slowcoach

    What about the Hippocratic Oath, is it no longer required, or just not believed?
    Quite apart from the selfish poison of femarxism,
    this is what happens when people are motivated by money and not love.
    Another demonstration, as if it were needed, about the love of money being the root of all evil.

    • franknowzad

      “They” Got rid of the Hippocratic Oath years ago. It got in the way of murdering babies.

  • Tory Thinker?

    Surely the answer is for the female doctors to persuade their husbands to do more to help at home rather than seek to force an inefficient monolith like the now to be even more inefficient.

    Where are the protests demanding more flexibility for fathers…

  • marc biff

    Just call them out for what they are,lazy, over indulged,sanctimonious bints.

    • Itsquitesimple

      90 hours a week, looking after 100-125 patients at nights, paying off £75K debts, studying for numerous post-graduate exams, moving towns and regions often every six months, covering numerous empty posts and now being asked to work 9 of every 14 shifts in unsocial hours. Are you serious? Love to debate

      • marc biff

        I used to do that for months at a time working in a muddy pit in the middle of nowhere in all weathers ,good money no doubt but nowhere near what doctors earn and i would not expect that so just stop your bloody whinging,the rest of us,you know the people who work in the private sector who actually pay the taxes that pay your salaries are sick to death of hearing how hard done by you lot are.If you don’t like the damned job you know where the door is as my old foreman would say.

        • Itsquitesimple

          Mmm. You will have earned considerably more than these junior doctors, probably been paid overtime for evening and weekend work and not entered the workplace with a large debt. In addition, you will not have had their responsibility or accountability. As someone in the private sector who pays considerable taxes, are you not grateful that you have a public sector that maintains your health or would you rather pay private fees for the services that you enjoy.

          • marc biff

            i maintain my health thanks very much and i also payed considerable taxes and had considerable responsibility,i had to pass rigourous practical tests every six months at my own expense and as for being grateful to the public services they get payed to do a job of work the same as me but with considerably more perks,are you grateful to me and people like me every time you turn on your gas fire or fill your car up with fuel?

          • Itsquitesimple

            So which part of the new contract are you especially happy with?

            Name me some perks. One will do.

            Haven spoken to two junior doctors, the alienation from the new contract is visceral and probably generational. This dispute will have lasting effects on the NHS sadly.

          • Stephen T

            I worked weekends for no extra pay in a difficult, dangerous and unpleasant job. I earned far less than any doctor. I respect doctors, but they’ve never done anything else, so their sense of victimhood isn’t balanced by experience of crap pay in rubbish jobs. Stick at it and you’ll have a good life, and you deserve it. But plenty of people aren’t so fortunate.

          • Itsquitesimple

            Did you work 64% (9 of 14 shifts) of your working week either at evenings, weekends or nights for no extra pay? Did you opt-out of the european working-time directive to ensure ‘safe’ staffing levels? Did you graduate with £75K debt? Did you find you were amongst the lowest paid in your organisation overnight despite being the highest qualified and most accountable? I could go on. Speak to some junior doctors (including sons and daughters of conservative MPs) if you want to get a feel for the dispute.

            The new contract has already been virtually rewritten it was so poor at the outset (it is already being used in post-graduate HR courses as a case-study on how to alienate a workforce with unreasonable and unworkable demands).

            You need to understand what this dispute is about. It is not about junior doctors; its about the entire public service. Why they started with the most over-worked group I simply don’t know. Inept to say the least.

      • Stephen T

        Now that is a good argument. Stick to the facts and you’ll do better.

  • Ordovici

    How did people this stupid pass medical exams or even get into university in the first place?

    • WFC

      Unfortunately, universities aren’t what they used to be.

    • The Patriarchy

      Someone fixed the qualification system to ensure that certain groups were favoured, even if it was only by “collaborative endeavour”, or cheating as we used to call it.

    • fitzfitz

      Answer : many didn’t – as the Court records show, as Letterkenny General showed…

  • Mez

    I can’t say I’m surprised you’ve had such a negative reaction from women Doctors, after all, the European Human Rights act protects from sexual discrimination, which is basically what you are supporting, by disregarding all other Doctor retirement and emigration issues; (quite a few male Doctors in the photo above), in favor of your stance against women. “Compliant and emasculated Royal College” sic. The 2010 equality acts scope includes the ‘community and voluntary sector’, including public functions, could be where the interest has arisen from.

    • The Patriarchy

      Kathy Gyngell isn’t supporting sexual discrimination, nor does she have a “stance against women”

      She merely asks that well-paid public sector employees do the job for which they are paid, and not some lesser proportion of it.

      That, apparently, is an affront to the the selfish, the lazy, the greedy, and the entitled.

      • Itsquitesimple

        but thats the problem ……… junior doctors are poorly paid (amongst the lowest in the hospitals during unsocial hours) and want to be paid for what they do. If, as is clear, the DoH won’t pay, they will become clockwatchers and not engage with any reforms.

  • Phil R

    “Because this is modern Britain, she added in a final reductio ad absurdum.”

    That gave me the first laugh of the day!

    The solution of course is to break the monopoly of the NHS. I calculate that if the NHS budget was spread equally, my family would be able to spend £13000 per year on private healthcare/insurance. We would then have a choice. Not USSR healthcare.

    I would be very very happy with half that to spend as I choose on the healthcare insurance and healthcare prevention, (Gym, wellness weekends etc)

    So how about £6500 per year per family for healthcare to spend as you choose.

    Any takers?

    • CRM_114

      Not a fair comparison, since you would lose many of the economies of scale of the NHS, so your ‘fair share’ would not buy as much as it does now.

      • Phil R

        Look carefully, £6500 pa is only half the amount the NHS “costs” my family.

        Economies of scale? How many “change advisors” and “diversity officers” would be employed in a large number of much smaller competing clinics?

        The answer from Germany that has a far far better system for the money (I would say 20 years ahead of the NHS in terms of treatments offered) is none.

        Economies of scale goes both ways it seems……

        • fitzfitz

          I recall the case of the doctor at Letterkenny General Hospital last year – who was discovered not to speak English, to have harmed patients, who cost ridiculous sums to “employ” – because the feminised profession, aware of all this, feared to shout STOP …

        • CRM_114

          Then your argument is against the change advisors, etc, not the NHS structure, and I would agree with you on that one.
          I think every aspect of Government could do with a full productivity review; the senior management at many schools has doubled in the last decade or so, and every one of those extra salaries just pushes Government paperwork around. The reviews would need to be independent (that’s GENUINELY independent), not like the military reviews of a few years back where all the spare Brigadiers were given the task of working out how many excess Brigadiers there were.

    • fitzfitz

      Exactly : on Friday, physio on the 5th floor of the Shard, right beside Guys but also beside LBH…

  • ancientpopeye

    Your original characterisation of them was spot on, they are “the I’m entitled brigade” in spades.

  • The Patriarchy

    Excellent article.

    A shame our gutless appeasing Government won’t call these avaricious and selfish public sector parasites out. Unfortunately the NHS is now an extreme case of producer-capture. The needs of patients are absolutely subordinate to the aspirations of NHS staff.

    • Itsquitesimple

      Or an extreme case of monopoly employer subjugation.

  • Johnnymcevoy

    The elites are joined by a strong common thread that pervades ‘government’.
    .
    Their absolute belief in their entitlement to grow very comfortably rich at the public expense with relatively little effort and no risk and to collect a fat public pension at the end.

  • SonofBoudica

    Training is only the foundation for qualification. Working experience is more important. Part-timers have less experience. I had a lady dentist who only ever worked part time. It showed – sometimes painfully. In the end I changed To a ptactice with a dentist who worked full time.

  • Clare

    Erm…there seem to be rather a lot of men in the striking photo. I never got the impression the strike was a particularly feminist issue – I know seasoned male doctors who wholeheartedly support Kathy Gyngell’s habit of blaming women for everything that’s (allegedly) wrong in an institution is getting old.

    • corinium

      The stats show that doctors under 30 are 60% female to 40% male (Link: http://www.gmc-uk.org/publications/23435.asp)
      As this is a junior doctors strike, it is safe to assume that the majority will be under 30 or not far over it, and thus will be predominantly female, and thus its perfectly reasonable to speculate as to whether this change in the gender balance of the medical profession is having an effect on the attitudes within the profession to working conditions and pay.

      • Clare

        Many are female, but I don’t think that’s the reason for the strike – rather they are being exploited and depreciated. Many (I know this having friends who are doctors) went in due to a genuine sense of vocation and public service, whatever their critics claim. Additionally, as I’ve said before, the perception of a ‘feminised’ (whatever that means) NHS, fits in far too neatly to Kathy Gyngell’s tendency to suggest that women who don’t know their place are responsible for everything that she sees as wrong in a particular institution. As a fairly conservative girl with a feminist streak (yes, we do exist) I’m sick of it. Stop treating women as scapegoats.

        • corinium

          They are not being expected to deal with working conditions that are any worse than the male dominated doctor profession had to deal with years ago, without going on strike. Thats the point – its that the ethos of the profession has changed – in the old days a male doctor complaining about long hours would have been told by his colleagues ‘Suck it up man, its what you signed up for.’ Now the reaction is (whether the complainant is male or female) ‘Oh, you poor special petal, you shouldn’t be expected to work that hard!’.

    • fitzfitz

      There are indeed : feminised, ethnic minority clients of the cultural marxist female doctor activists are evident, apparently. Or is that obviously. ” Rights before responsibility ” demands break their ruddy Hippocratic oath – if there still is one.

  • Barry W

    The self-righteousness of women doctors is only typical of middle-class women across the public sector; have you ever seen a BBC producer (f) in full flight when she is denied something to which she is convinced she is entitled?
    A terrifying sight!!

  • Crimble

    Compared to my youth today’s junior doctors are far better paid, work far fewer hours and can complete their specialist training in far less time.

    They really should stop complaining and realise they are doing a lot better than many other public sector workers.

  • franknowzad

    As a taxpayer with private cover I think it great that 60% of junior doctors are female.
    You only have to pay them half what the boys get.

    • fitzfitz

      Not at physio on the Shard’s fifth floor unfortunately! But the coffee is good.

  • Itsquitesimple

    Women are more upset than men about the contract but that is inevitable given than 9 of the 14 prospective shifts are during unsocial hours (evening, nights and weekends), but the burnout amongst women is also considerably higher in the acute hospital specialities where they find the demands especially challenging. To say this has been mishandled by Richmond House would be an understatement; it is difficult to find anyone impartial to support the contract which, if nothing else, has left the aspiration of a 7-day NHS utterly unachievable (Number 10 and 11 will be quietly delighted as the cost would have been so high).