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Lefty Lunacy: ‘Skint’ university blows cash on storytelling

Universities are often the most vocal of the PC elite when complaining that they are not funded well enough, and the ‘University’ of South Wales is no different.

Castigated by sound Tory MP David Davies for “always bleating about having no money”, the university has now advertised a £63,000-a-year role for a ‘Professor of Storytelling’. Yes. Really.

The university, which counts Plaid Cymru’s wilting daffodil Leanne Wood as among its ‘esteemed’ alumni, defends storytelling as “a subject of academic research and practice for many years and is becoming an increasingly important way of understanding our lives, work and future.”

TCW cannot wait to hear the story of the day this ‘university’ stops wasting public cash.

(Image: David Morris)

The Conservative Woman

  • Groan

    I thought the whole idea of student loans was to push this “industry” to respond to its consumers. Thus far the whole thing appears to have meant Universities have proliferated and grown “fat” often charging huge fees for pretty cheap courses to deliver. Perhaps unsurprisingly given the sheer numbers, word on the street (I’m in the generation with friends with offspring out of Uni. now) is that many past students don’t end up paying back loans. Can’t help thinking loans should be made by institutions more used to making and tracking loans. Otherwise I presume Unis will continue to “farm” publicly provided loans and float on the gravy train.

    • Bik Byro

      In the last 20 years or so we have seen university education shift from being something taught to the brightest pupils to something sold to anyone who can stump up (ie borrow at great expense) the cash.

      You can basically “buy” a degree in a similar way to what you would buy a car.

      The biggest con of all is making thousands of middle and low-achievement school leavers actually believe that a degree would make a positive difference.

  • Uusikaupunki

    Seen through the eyes of the cultural Marxist powers-that-be, this is not a waste of money. Taken in the context of “safe spaces”, “trigger-warnings” and the like, it’s just another step on the road to infantilization of the population. One can purchase colouring-in books for adults now, so nothing surprises me.

    • Labour_is_bunk

      New take on a old joke: “A fire has destroyed Jeremy Corbyn’s personal library.

      In a tearful press conference he said “I’d almost finished colouring the second book”.”

    • Labour_is_bunk

      Well, you’ve had grown men and women wearing replica football shirts for years now.
      I stopped when I was about 14.

  • Owen_Morgan

    ‘The university…defends storytelling as “a subject and practice for many years…”

    I wasn’t aware that you could take a degree in storytelling (just how many different ways are there to say, “The dog ate my essay”?), but it’s owning up to the practice of storytelling that strikes me. We’ve all seen the phenomenon, of course: hottest year evaah, disappearing Polar Bears, evaporating ice-sheets, deadlier hurricanes, rising seas – to list just a handful.

    I just never expected to see a university admit to peddling “stories”.

    • weirdvisions

      The course is a must for all Beeboids.

  • Bik Byro

    Next week : a professorship in how to boil a kettle

    • Owen_Morgan

      Temperature-adjusted.

    • Craig Martin

      Dang, I was looking for one to teach me to boil water!
      🙂

      • Bik Byro

        No, that’s where the professorship bit comes in. To boil a kettle you will need a temperature of around 2800 degrees Celsius. On that basis, it is actually impossible to boil an egg due to the high calcium content of the shell, however it will melt at around 1300 degrees C

        • Craig Martin

          Good Lord, I’m going to need to attend uni and study how to make a cuppa!

          • Bik Byro

            I’m not an expert myself, but I do have a PhD in toasting two slices of bread in the morning.

          • weirdvisions

            Just you wait until they begin to run courses in the most efficient place to squeeze a tube of toothpaste for the best effect. It will be run in parallel with a selected post-modern physics course. Of course.

      • choccycobnobs

        Here at the University of Rear-Ends on Seats (URES) we offer a B.A course in boiling
        water. The course comprises of the following modules:

        ·
        Purpose Determination; To ascertain if the objective is for coffee,
        Tea, Bovril, Cocoa or washing the car.

        ·
        Fuel selection; Gas, Electricity or open fire.

        ·
        Safety precautions; Manual Handling, PPE, MHSWR,
        fire precaution procedures

        ·
        Environmental pathways; pollution, carbon
        footprints, preservation of resources, recycling

        ·
        First Aid; CPR, symptoms of CO poisoning, burns
        management

        ·
        Occupational health; caffeine drawbacks, sugar
        and obesity, dangers of holding hot cups

        • Bik Byro

          I believe a similar course is also in the prospectus of the Corporate University of New Technology Systems.

          • choccycobnobs

            Your example probably only runs one week out of four. Whereas URES can be 3 years full time; 4 years sandwich course; 19hrs/week part-time (very popular with overseas students as it allows claiming of state benefits) and the correspondence course (i.e. we send you a teabag and a bottle of water).

          • Bik Byro

            True, but the week leading up to the start of the one-week course is very stressful.

          • choccycobnobs

            I can see why you won the bubbly. You win again.

          • David Sutton

            How DARE you suggest correspondence. You are presuming to suggest that persons of Social Justice persuasion (such as my exalted self) not associate with the throngs of like-minded Womyn and lesser beings! Have a care, or I will withdraw my very important support.

          • weirdvisions

            I saw what you did there!

            LOL

        • weirdvisions

          Pure class!

  • Under-the-weather

    As mentioned below this probably has a social engineering application. Someone mentioned that schools are banning classical fairy tales ?

  • Charitas Lydia

    This can happen only in Wales under the mad government there!

  • Guardian’s Quitter

    “The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people’s money.”

  • simonstephenson

    If only the £63,000 was per hour rather than per annum, because if that were the case then the ideal candidate, one Anthony Charles Lynton Blair, PC, could well have been interested. Few, past or present, could claim even to be able to hold a candle to this master of story telling, and there’s little doubt that with Blair’s talent in the Chair, the University of South Wales Department of Storytelling would have had the opportunity to achieve fame throughout the academic world.

  • Jordan Gonzo

    As a former student of this university I’ll try to offer some insight.

    I’ve not been able to read fully into the vacancy offer because it has now mysteriously disappeared. I can only assume that negative media interest has caused this.
    However, from my experience there, I can guess what the job would entail.

    The campus in question is a film and media campus, so students would do degrees in things such as fashion design, visual effects & motion graphics, set design, media production, et cetera. If you’re gonna whinge that such degrees exist, please, come watch Rogue One, The Avengers or the new Bladerunner with me then whinge that people do degrees in making films. Whether you agree with the politics of such films or not, you gotta know what you’re doing when actually making the films.

    The position for “professor of storytelling” would fit under narrative forms, that is, how to construct a narrative, character design, etc. If you’re doing a degree into script writing or what have you, having a professor of storytelling would be very useful. I doubt it would form a degree or course of its own, but would fit into other degrees as an accompanying module.

    £63,000 p/a could be argued as excessive, but then again, I don’t know how much professors normally earn.

    Aside from that, I don’t know much else. I doubt the professor would spend time spreading (cultural) marxism, we leave that for the gender studies department – I wasn’t exposed to it when I was there. Believe it or not, but many of us film and media lot don’t have time for such garbage, we’re too busy doing our degrees!

    • John P Hughes

      Thank you for explaining what the courses at the institution concerned are. Film and TV production is an industry with a huge range and now uses very advanced technology. I am aware of the National Film and Television School at Beaconsfield, Bucks at which many people study. Creating the ‘story’ for a film and scriptwriting is an important part of film-making and it needs to be taught. Had the post being advertises as ‘Professor of Film Script and Narrative’ it would have not attracted any attention from the media.
      £63,000 does not sound a high salary if the aim is to attract someone who has worked as a scriptwriter and editor in film and TV – and that is the person one would want.

    • Mara Naile-Akim

      professors are off the payscale, so their salaries are individually negotiated with the university

      my guess would be, that her salary is near the bottom end of the range. And she would have a requirement placed on her to get in a lot of grant money, so a large chunk of that 63k would make it back to the employer.

      also, as a professor, she is bound to have a lot of publications, and be able to contribute to the REF-score of the department, boosting the funding it gets from the government

      these salaries sound huge, but the nature of the higher education system magnifies salaries at the top