Andrew Cadman: Hold fast over Brexit, Mrs May

Last week two hugely important events occurred that will not only make or break Brexit but determine the future of all of Europe. The first was the apparent acquiescence by Theresa May to Michael Gove’s demand that Britain will not be bound by European regulation as part of any trade deal.

We will, of course, believe it when we see it. For those of us old enough to remember, May’s leadership seems like a dismal re-run of the John Major years, made all the more depressing and painful because the stakes are now so much higher. Like Major before her, May is a grey, mediocre careerist who loathes risk and whose every instinct is to cave in and seek ‘compromise’ (i.e. surrender) on any given position. Flat-footed, reactive and utterly without vision, the kind of person for whom a bird in the hand is worth a thousand in the bush, everything in her track record suggests that her instincts will be to avoid ‘crashing out’ of the EU. Despite her rhetoric, for her any deal at all is better than no deal.

It therefore seems highly unlikely that May will stick to her guns, and that way utter disaster lies. A trade deal that tied us to European regulation would almost certainly mean continued membership of the Single Market in all but name, reducing Britain to the status of a European Union colony. The brief, fleeting promise Brexit afforded would disappear, and we would surely become a psychologically broken nation that Europe could threaten and bully whenever it pleased, no doubt demanding we follow future diktats on pain of the trade relationship being withdrawn. A low-growth, thoroughly demoralised country without belief in itself or its institutions would surely be highly susceptible to the siren song of the classical Marxist message of Corbyn and McDonnell’s new model Labour Party.



The EU itself is also at a critical juncture. On the one hand, its plans for an anti-democratic super-state are rapidly reaching fruition with last week’s second hugely important event – the highly ominous announcement that an EU army is being formed. On the other hand, the EU is racked by nationalist tensions that could yet break it up or at least force it on to a radically different path – maybe, at the risk of sounding very naïve, to being the collection of friendly, free-trading nation-states it always should have been. Armies in the hands of unaccountable elites facing nationalist revolt rarely end well, and it is not in Britain’s or Europe’s interest that the hands of the Brussels elites are strengthened before this nightmare is realised. For their part, the EU elites know the time is short and are plainly terrified that Brexit Britain will provide an example for others to follow.

Brexit, therefore, is in its largest sense not just about the economic future of Britain but a moral imperative on which the fate of all of Europe hinges. Indeed, it is even bigger than that: the entire Western world has fallen into a deep cultural malaise over the past few decades. The social capital it built through its Judeo-Christian heritage over centuries is all but destroyed, inevitably now severely affecting future growth prospects. Well beyond the short-term gains of economic deregulation, rebuilding that capital will require determination and a renewed sense of self-belief. Such a psychological reset can come about only with a sharp break from the recent past and opportunity to discover what we once were and can be again – a dynamic free-trading nation of its heritage and traditions.

In 1805 Pitt the Younger called on Britain to ‘save Europe by our example’. Let us strive to save not just Europe but the Western world by our example today.

Hold fast, Mrs May.

Andrew Cadman

  • Blazeaway

    An entirely accurate summary of Mrs May’s miserable instincts and the likelihood of Britain remaining in the EU.

    Yes, we would be psychologically broken as a people if that were to happen. The only hope is that people turn to UKIP – firstly, as a way to hold Mrs May’s feet to the fire; secondly, if Leave voters are betrayed, then we will need to start the battle all over again.

    • TheRightToArmBears

      If only UKIP had not been destroyed by the Tory plants, Carswell, Evans, Reckless and others who ate away the unity necessary to keep the party focussed on Brexit.
      The blind mantra of calling any criticism of Islamic immigration racist was a major part of this split in the party, leading to a witch-hunt against Anne Marie as a candidate to lead the party.
      UKIP is now husk led by a LibDem.

      • Alan Llandrindod Wells

        A husk, because people thought the referendum had made them redundant.

        Back with a vengeance when elitist, corruption, and dishonesty, wins.

        Then heaven help the useless Blairite Tories.
        By then Corbyn will have nullified his Blairites.

    • Alan Llandrindod Wells

      The tragic May.
      No backbone.
      Not really a believer.

      And surrounded by fake Conservatives.

      God help us.

      • richardofkent

        A company needs to earn a profit in order to pay corporation tax. If it pays large salaries to reduce profit then it will pay income tax and national insurance. As a UK corporate it will also pay VAT, stamp duty, Insurance premium tax etc. Whilst I am no fan of May let us not throw the baby out with the bathwater, in other words a dislike of May should not lead to criticism of legal tax reduction methods used by everyone to a greater or lesser degree.

        • Alan Llandrindod Wells

          Tax avoidance is legal.
          But there is something a bit grey, when such as Offshore Dave, and Offshore Gideon, tax the rest of us.
          And all those millionaires hanging around the Westminster cesspit, who made their fortunes in the fraudulent financial institutions.
          Clegg, whose relative got him a job in the city, was I am sure as white as driven snow. But we know where the institutions made their profits.
          Ian Fraser, a journalist I admire, describes the UK as seriously corrupt. He is correct.

    • Alan Llandrindod Wells

      British representative to the EU court says we must stay within its jurisdiction.
      What next?
      Ice cream manufacturer says we should eat more ice cream.

  • martianonlooker

    Most Brexiteers would probably agree with your summation of May’s characteristics. Britain is sitting holding a royal straight flush in the Brexit poker negotiations and May seems determined to fold at the first opportunity.
    We have a fantastic opportunity to fracture the EU superstate by simply walking away. The EU bureaucracy is avarice coupled to arrogance. If we walk without paying a penny their budget goes out the window. Other states wont stick around if the EU isn’t bribing them with cash and Germany has too many problems to be funding the entire budget alone.
    Short of a civil war, Britain is going to concede to the traitors of remain.

    • CheshireRed

      Spot on about the quality of hand we hold. I’ve said similar from day one. May probably thinks she holds a 10 high and doesn’t want to raise the stakes in case she upsets her opponent. Crazy. Play with gusto and just as in poker we could wipe them out and if we did they’d have nobody to blame but themselves.
      Gove and Boris have clearly left May in no doubt of their expectations. If she wavers then she MUST be removed before she does irreparable damage to the UK.

  • Owen_Morgan

    As a defensive force, an EU army would be beyond parody. Think Bruegel’s “Tower of Babel”, with three 1970s-vintage armoured personnel carriers in the middle distance (one with a missing caterpillar track).

    That image would hardly intimidate our most immediate geopolitical enemy, who, for my money, is Turkey, not Russia, but external defence wouldn’t be the point. There was a suggestion recently that the UK might contribute to a euro-army even post-Brexit, which is a completely insane idea. A European army would be answerable to eurocrats, themselves answering to no-one, and would be used to suppress internal dissent.

    We currently have naval ratings guarding Buckingham Palace, because there aren’t enough Guardsmen to do the job and there aren’t enough ships to put the sailors in. All the same, at least, they are protecting their sovereign and their nation. If they were part of a euro-army, their obedience would be transferred. I don’t envisage that there would be much resistance, at senior levels, to that. After all, the generals and admirals would only be following the example of the politicians, civil service and judiciary.

    As for Dr Cadman’s assessment of the dismal May, I defy anyone to disagree. She does not merely fail to inspire; she does whatever the opposite of inspiring is (not “uninspiring”; she is far worse than that). She has constantly grovelled to hostile media, betraying actual voters in a bizarre pursuit of some phantom voting bloc elsewhere: people who found her “nasty party” pun entertaining, presumably. May seems always to have wanted to be Prime Minister, but never with any idea of what she intended to do in the job.

    Tacitus wrote of the Roman emperor Galba: “Omnium consensu, capax imperii, nisi imperasset.” Loosely: “Everyone agreed he would have made a great emperor – if only he had never been one.”

    I’m not sure May ever inspired that much confidence in her pre-PM days, but does anyone, outside Brussels and the muslim brotherhood, have confidence in her now?

    • martianonlooker

      “We currently have naval ratings guarding Buckingham Palace”.
      For the Queen’s sake I hope no Iranians bimble past.

    • shred

      It appears that Theresa the Appeaser has been signing us up to the EU armed forces since she was intalled. The articles start about 2/3 of the way down.

      http://facts4eu.org/news_jul2_2017.shtml#def1

      • ecclesiaman

        You are correct. The run down of our armed forces is policy to make our defence contribution a part of the whole EU unification army. The UK part insufficient to defend itself or our other interests as the leaders of our forces now confess. This has been policy for decades. Our elites have been complicit for this (PESCO) but the public have been kept in the dark. The government did not sign PESCO (look it up on Veterans for Britain website) but still retain a seat with the nations (well not really nations, more vassal regions) who did. The committee seat is empty but the name is on the table! More than likely the politicians will increase their treachery against the country by signing up at a later date.
        The new defence minister is having to get the treasury to fund 2 landing craft enabling Royal Marines to operate as they customarily have done in the past, and this will be a litmus test of intention to uphold some meagre level of adaptable military capacity. Even if this is acquiesced by the treasury it will only be a fig leaf and insufficient in the whole scheme of things for our defence needs.
        Is their a politician of any party who is interested in the defence of the country? Whether UKIP’s Henry Bolton is able and willing to sacrifice himself for this task remains to be seen.
        This is only one aspect of the EU quagmire which could well implode with who knows what results. The tower of Babel project was thwarted and ultimately the aims and objects of the EU and what lies behind that supra national project will similarly fail. Sadly it’s people who suffer.

        • CheshireRed

          Completely agree re running down UK military to prepare for immersion in EU army. Remember Brexit vote less than 2 years ago which is nothing in MoD procurement time. They’ve been caught out by the unexpected vote and now their subterfuge is exposed for all to see. As so often before, this is effectively an act of treason by our own ‘leaders’. Dear oh dear.

        • gunnerbear

          I keep reading comments that the taxpayer ought to fund the MoD more and more…so just how much is enough? I’m genuinely interested to know..because the MoD is like any other dept….it will keep asking for more and more and more and its chums in the Press will keep demanding more and more and more….

          • ecclesiaman

            I accept your comments about the MOD. Procurement is terrible especially in the navy, but the generals recently said the army is 20 years behind. The whole point is that our government (or whoever is running it behind the scenes) do not have a Brexit agenda. Getting behind the campaign for these 2 landing craft is an attempt to maintain a little of what we have and need. Our MP’s do not seem to realise that PESCO is a sell out of the country and the referendum vote to leave. No chance of that. We will be paying out more and more as we stay in the clutches of the EU conglomerate and possibly the MOD will be redundant! My own MP tells me we still have sovereignty!! I doubt he really believes it but wants the constituents to be lulled into believing it.

      • Alan Llandrindod Wells

        Like the “Theresa the appeaser”.

    • gunnerbear

      No, I thought we’ve got naval ratings mounting the guard because it is Prince Philip & HM 70th wedding anniversary and Prince Phillip is of course a life long naval man.

  • Uusikaupunki

    “Like Major before her, May is a grey, mediocre careerist who loathes risk and whose every instinct is to cave in and seek ‘compromise’ (i.e. surrender) on any given position.”

    Exactly….my gut feeling is she was put in place for that very reason – to destroy Brexit. She was (and still is) a Remainer through and through.

    • ClickBait

      May must go.
      The only way this will happen is if the Conservative party is sent a message by voters that a destroyed Brexit will mean oblivion for them. As indeed it would.

      • Mojo

        I think they already know this. However, the Tories will only ever consider the Party. They never consider the voter or their grassroots. If it suits them to keep May at the helm they will do so, regardless of the mess she creates. They did so with John Major and look at the mess he left.

        My wish is that the Brexiteer backbenchers from all Parties go back to their constituents and offer them the option of a New Party whereby no by-elections need be held but the new party would create an effective opposition to the Tories until we get Brexit over with. Then they can decide whether or not that left/right wing politics is over and it is the politics of democracy, policy and the people that takes us into the future. I do believe more of the electorate would engage in politics again and a number of different parties would emerge, who actually listen to the country and not big lobbyists

        • gunnerbear

          The idea of Blues and Reds working together post-Brexit has already proven to be a non-starter as othewise ex-Dark Blue voters and Old Labour voters would’ve keep UKIP going as a major party.

      • davidraynes

        I note that many people are increasingly “Ready for Rees-Mogg”.

        Big enough message for you?

        • Roanoake

          Only if it happens. I don’t know how long I’m prepared to wait.

    • Mojo

      Totally agree. I also think that Boris was also ready to threaten the EU so we could have a few concessions and then another referendum. Gove realised this but handled it very badly. The fact that Boris and the big Remainers didn’t Support Andrea Leadsom was an utter disgrace. It showed them up in their true light of not really expecting the Leavers to win. We do not know whether Andrea would have succeeded or not. My gut feeling is she would have been a bit wobbly at first but would grow into the role. She was definitely a better risk than Theresa May. Westminster must have realised that Andrea would stand by her convictions but May would be malleable.

      The whole situation is an unholy mess that need never have been. A desire to honour the vote and a strong leader would have seen us on the way out now, with no money wasted, no promises made and probably dealing comfortably with WTO until EU businesses could see which decisions would be best for them.

  • Trojan

    After Cameron lost the referendum, May was Remain Plan B. She will have to be replaced before she loses the next election. Beware of Boris as Remain Plan C

    • Mojo

      I really think this is why so many brilliant backbenchers are not being included in Ministerial or Cabinet work.

  • Frank

    Excellent article, but why do you think May will achieve this clean break with the EU? Her Cabinet would have been swept away some time ago were it not for the utter weakness of Labour. We are lions led by gerbils.

  • Malcolm

    What is often missed when discussing the sheer vacuity of John Major’s government is that he is overwhelmingly to blame for the present position in which the UK now finds itself. His decision to ram the Maastricht Treaty through parliament without seeking consent from the electorate through a referendum, the only practical way to gauge public support as all the major political parties at the 1992 election were in favour of ratification, was a watershed moment in our relationship with the EU. Had a proper and honest debate been held and the matter put to a public vote before ratification as it should have been, we might never have become members of political union in the first place and so all the subsequent treaties would not have been relevant and any difficulties presented by Brexit avoided. The residual feelings of bitterness experienced by opponents at being effectively disenfranchised has soured UK politics ever since and the Brexit vote was merely the culmination of that. His betrayal of democracy will be his historical legacy.

    If Mrs May wishes something more positive to be written about her by future historians she would do well to take this article to heart.

    • Flaketime

      The biggest problem with Maastricht was that the politicians didn’t understand it, and the media certainly didn’t. No one ever explained what all the fuss was about, probably because they didn’t want the British people to know.

      Today we have the BBC openly lying to the people about facts they do not want the people to understand.
      Just ask people if they can tell you the cause of the Bosnian conflict
      What Maastricht was about
      What branch of Islam does ISIS follow (other than that they aren’t really Muslims at all!)

    • ratcatcher11

      Major prefers Britain to be ruled by fascists and thinks the will of the people should be ignored. That’s why he is sitting watching cricket because the people dumped him in favour of the blue skies of Blair, that turned brimstone yellow very quickly as his lies began to unravel. Blair, Major, May, Cameron, Corbyn, Brown, what a bunch of losers Britain has been saddled with. The Conservatives have any number of truly talented people but prefer the losers they know will maintain the status quo rather than rock the boat with decent talents such as JRM and yes Pritti Patel who was engineered out of her job by May.

    • gunnerbear

      Should we also have had a referendum on the Single Europe Act as well…the Act that is the bedrock on which Maastricht et al. is built?

      • Malcolm

        Possibly as it effectively ended the national veto that we were promised in 1975 that we would always have and introduced QMV, although it was the Maastricht treaty which created the EU and gave it legal personality. That was a wholly different beast to that of which we had consented to remain members in the ’75 referendum. It is this constant moving of goalposts which the Remain camp always seek to deny. Major and his whole sorry government should be in the stocks and pelted with rotten fruit for what they did in 1992.

        • gunnerbear

          And don’t forget a previous PM who rammed through the Single Market Act…the bedrock that Maastricht was built on.

  • Mojo

    Mrs May has unfortunately made the most elementary mistake as soon as she took the position of PM. She decided to try and appease the Remainiacs who were the majority in a Parliament that had lost the respect of the country. She really didn’t believe Brexit would happen and therefore was going to play for time so people could change their minds.

    Instead what she should have done is told Parliament that they had given the choice of the future to the people of this country and they should honour the promise they made. Then she should have created a War Cabinet that consisted of all Brexiteers, but from across all Parties. And that includes the DUP. If she had been strong enough in the very beginning that cross party cabinet could have smoothed their Parties fears. We could have then included businessmen and economists who were British and independent of EU influence. It would probably have cause a runcous at first, but how could those parliamentarians who signed the paper declaring the will of the people would be democratically honoured, then turn round and publicly say they were ignoring democracy and the biggest democratic mandate in our history. They would be asked to stand down as MPs. No politician would give up theor lucrative career.

    Then she should have gone on to select advisers who were outside the Westminster bubble. Trusted businessmen and maybe retired MPs who understood the workings of the civil service. It seems to me that TM has had so many opportunities to make big expansive decisions to take this country forward and every single time she has chickened out.

    We now have a country that acknowledges and respects a democratic decision has been made and a Londoncentric Media/Westminster who wishes to ignore democracy and is trying to create more division than there really is.

    • Flaketime

      Mays apologists would say that is exactly what she did do with her Brexit means Brexit speech, however she leads a party which is far too broad a church, needlessly so and this has resulted in numerous fractures probably worse than any other party. Some of the MPs in the party are so left wing they should be in either Labour or the Fib Dems.

      All of that changed when she lost the election though and her two advisors who lost it for her were forced to go. Now if she doesn’t appease the remainers she will be removed as PM and won’t get as much from her Saudi masters.

      It seems to me that the longer she stays in office the less chance the Tories have of re-election even if they change the leader.

    • gunnerbear

      “Then she should have created a War Cabinet that consisted of all Brexiteers, but from across all Parties.” Some of the those in her own party would never have agreed to that.

  • Greenlander

    EU loves us this we know
    for the EU tells us so
    little ones to it belong
    we are weak the EU strong
    Yes EU loves us
    yes EU loves us
    yes EU loves us
    the EU tells us so.

  • slyblade

    If only the higher echelons of the Tory party would heed
    such common-sense reasoning from Andrew Cadman and the rest of the grass roots
    Conservative party members, but alas as we saw with her predecessor what the
    party members want is in direct contradiction of Tory high commands ideology.

    The
    country was asked a simple question on June 16th 2016 and
    that was “Should the
    United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the
    European Union?” That question was emphatically
    answered by 17.4 Million people; NO to the EU. Since that historic date we have
    seen an unending assault from the Remain camp on democracy and these assaults
    continues daily to undermine the democratic wish of the people. They have at
    every step thrown up every road bump to either slow or stop Brexit. May has
    never been openly critical of them and we can only assume that in her heart she
    still is a remainer and would like nothing more that see Brexit fail

    When May stood at the dispatch box and cooed thatcheresque
    like “Brexit means Brexit” on July 14th 2016 she was already planning
    her deceit, at the time I wrote what is May’s vision Brexit then? That has
    never been really truly answered but her track record as described by Mr Cadman
    suggest she will cave in to EU demands. She is weak and a political invertebrate,
    the EU have sensed her weakness and now want to squeeze her and us for all they
    can get. £20 Billion was offered to Brussels against every wish of the 17.4
    million leave voters and yet Brussels scoffed at her, she caved in to the bully
    boys of Brussels yet again and offered £40 Billions and still they laugh. Yet
    at home we are told we must tighten our belts we spend too much. She criticised
    Corbyn’s financial competence and rightfully so yet she can find £40 billion to
    pay to Brussels at a time when we need to invest in our own economy and
    services. I would remind Her that Blair offered Brussels a deal on the EU
    rebate for reforms in the EU agricultural programme they took his/our money and
    did nothing, that is what they will do with the Brexit deal she thinks she will
    get.

    History
    will show us she was dither and dawdler, her inability to chose a path and
    stick to it and her attempts undermine piece by piece the will of 17. 4 million
    that Brexit did in fact not become Brexit after all but some watered-down half
    in half out version keeping us tide to EU apron strings. I would suggest she
    will do a deal that is similar to Norway and she will give away our hard-won
    back fishing grounds. As the whole world queues up to do trade deals with us,
    instead of looking forward and embracing that world she steers the good ship UK
    back towards Brussels and the EU. We will be betrayed by Judas May for a pocketful
    of silver and we will live to regret it.

    What is left to say now about a conservative party that has
    long since abandoned Conservative values. It has become some kind of Lib-Dem
    light, not the Conservative party of old, the one I joined and helped until Major
    and Cameron drove us all out. May herself christened the Tory party the “nasty party”
    in fact it has become the laugh thing stock party. Her general election was abysmal
    and the result was an own goal considering what she was up against, a committed
    Marxist and hard left communist that would take us back to the dark days on the
    seventies. Unless the Tories embrace conservative values and portray that to
    the youth of today they will be lost for generations to a Marxist regime who
    will destroy all the hard won battles Thatcher won for us.

    • gunnerbear

      “Since that historic date we have seen an unending assault from the Remain camp on democracy and these assaults continues daily to undermine the democratic wish of the people. They have at every step thrown up every road bump to either slow or stop Brexit.” Just as for 40 years Leavers have done the same to fight to stop HMG taking us further into Europe. In fact even as the results were coming in during the ’75 vote, Benn and Powell (now there’s a duo you’d rarely see) made it clear that they would continue to fight to overturn the result….were TB and EP assaulting democracy? Of course – and I speak as a Leaver from an area that voted Leave – that Nigel F. didn’t help matters when he told the press that if the result was 52 – 48 to Remain, he’d consider the Brexit unfinished business. More than a few Remainers I know have pointed that comment out and reflect that since Nigel F. was prepared to continue the fight if Remain won, they feel its fine to fine on even though Leave won. Oh, if you want the younger voters to vote Blue…..you’ve got to give them something to vote for….not a land of housing beyond their reach, low wages and s**t unstable jobs on ZHCs.

    • Andrew Tekle-Cadman

      Thanks for taking the trouble to write such a long reply, but please never, ever think of me as a Tory, grassroots or otherwise…..

  • Dr Evil

    If May caves she will be dumped and a Brexiteer PM installed. Surprised that hasn’t happened re agreeing to a huge divorce bill in excess of the 40 billion.

  • captainslugwash

    Does anybody really believe that the spoiling tactics of May & Co is really through ineptitude alone?
    We are being sold down the river.

  • Ravenscar

    We should have walked on the morning of the 24th June 2016, if we had it would have been all over and we would now be Free of the shackles of the moribund – sclerotic Empire and enemy of all sovereign nations.

    But.

    ♫I put my right hand in,
    I put my right hand out,
    In out, in out.
    shake it all about.♪

    It is nigh Eighteen months since the executive was granted the people’s mandate to leave the EU and nothing, nowt, nada, zilch has happened.

    treeza the appeaser is doing a grand job, just as it was planned. The propaganda outlets have been banging the drum for Berlin for umpteen months, clegg, major, tarzan, mandelson, bliar, branson, gemima guyana, mutti, mircon says it will bring about Armageddon, the Russians have been blamed uncle Tom Cobbley is invoked and all.

    Stay under the jurisdiction of the ECJ? That’s not what the British people wanted under the cosh of the ECJ: that’s not OUT.

    Give them £40 billion when Phil says we’re broke?

    What planet is mrs maybe on, more to the point why hasn’t she been sent packing and back home and the answer is, the tories are, the hokey cokey party and the EU are playing their tune, just like they’ve done since the days of ted.

    • gunnerbear

      Interesting comment about the Blues and the EU… …made me think of this…. “The Tories have been indulging in their usual double talk. When they go to Brussels they show the greatest enthusiasm for political union. When they speak in the House of Commons they are most anxious to aver that there is no commitment whatever to any political union.”(Labour MP Hugh Gaitskell, October 1962)

      • Ravenscar

        Mr. Hugh Gaitskell a great shame he wasn’t a more hale fellow, he wasn’t far wrong [re the tories] – either. Indeed, was that the last time the labour party had a man of reason at its helm?

        Mind you, musing on Mr. Michael Foot for all his faults was a decent fellow and a very proud Englishman at that.

  • screwtape013

    The first step is to know your enemy and the second is to stop trading with them so Brexiteers shouldn’t buy Unilever brands (https://www.unilever.co.uk/brands/) or owt from, in particular, France, Germany and, of course, Ireland (sorry Laura!)

  • Cullerchris

    Judging by the latest news re a £55bn sell out she’ll be out on her backside shortly. Good riddance.

    • Flaketime

      Try doubling that, she’s capitulated to every single demand made of her and some, with an acceptance of 100 million Euros.

      Unbelievable.

      It should now be raised by a wealth tax on those who supported this craven party.

  • Skulduggery

    The Conservatives have caved in to the EU’s unwarranted demands then. Goodbye to another Tory government within the foreseeable future, they have lost my vote.

  • Stinky Britches

    May is a bloody disgrace. Not only has she betrayed her nation, she has almost certainly guaranteed a Labour victory at the next general election. Damn this insufferable woman.

    • gunnerbear

      “…she has almost certainly guaranteed a Labour victory at the next general election.” Why would that be?

  • CheshireRed

    So much for ‘hold fast’! What a truly appalling piece of ‘negotiating’, and it’ll get worse too when these Quislings posing as a UK government cave in on EU T&C demands for a trade agreement. We’ll be ‘leaving’ on terms that amount to Brexit in name only. 1922 committee, time to sack Mrs May.

  • gunnerbear
  • Oxford massive

    Jesus Christ. So this is where you are all hanging out. Wailing at just how unfair the whole thing is. Rather than take responsibility for the reality of a decision that you supported. Throwing your little tantrums. Everything is someone else’s fault. Unresolved childhood authority issues. This board will be studied by social scientists in the future.

    • hugodegauche

      Interesting that an empty vessel like you is so self delusional as to pretend to offer any guidance or commentary on anything. A person who has lost every battle in their life and full of false pride combined in a sickly mess with shame. A person who would believe in anything if it made them part of herd of virtuous drones. We both know that an attractive celebrity, a few weeks of Facebook posts and some glossy pictures could change you around 180 degrees to “believe” the opposite of what you now do. Generation Nothing.

    • Flaketime

      could you explain that please because it make no sense at all.

      “Wailing at just how unfair the whole thing is. ”

      What ‘whole thing’? where does anyone mention unfairness?

      “Rather than take responsibility for the reality of a decision that you supported.”

      Which decision would that be exactly, because if you are referring to the Brexit vote, that does not mean giving carte blanche to a previously unknown negotiator to concede to ridiculous demands which were also unknown at the time of the Brexit vote.

      There is a thing called informed consent – at the time of the Brexit vote no one really knew what the negotiations would bring, other than the EU would behave like a petulant bully lashing out and wanting to punish a victim – it was a reasonable assumption that British Politicians would act in British interests, especially given the rhetoric.

      Personally I believe that if Politicians do make promises to the people those promises should be binding on them with threat of legal sanction if they fail to then honour them. Manifesto commitments should be treated the same way, and no new policies or laws introduced if not in the manifesto.

      I would suggest on the childhood authority issue that it is in fact you who have the issue. An over authoritative parent who allowed no decision making leads you now to happily hand over all responsibility to a parent figure to make all those decisions on your behalf while you sit back in blissful uncaring ignorance.

  • Debs

    The mere fact of the way the EU is acting with its bullying tactics shows anyone who cares to look the reason why so many voted to Leave .This has been their modus operandi for years.
    You cannot negotiate with a proven bully.
    Mrs May is a typical fence sitter of the managerial class. She talks tough but her words don’t translate. A case of the Emperors New Clothes.
    Most of us who voted leave expect pain and still want to go ahead ,in fact even more strongly. Get on with it Mrs May not off posturing and virtue signalling in the Middle East.