Andrew Cadman: Imprisoned by the EU and £50bn for the privilege – nice one, Theresa!

In case you missed it:

Always Surrender! Theresa May’s battle cry could not be more different from those flint-faced Ulster Prods who valiantly stood their ground yesterday.

However it is only prolonging the agony: for those of us who have believed in Brexit all our adult lives, the pain and rage over what is happening is so indescribable that it is difficult to get one’s thoughts together on the subject: anger, bitterness, dark thoughts of revenge all swirl around the brain. It got so bad that I found myself praying for a Corbyn government just to put us out of our misery and humiliation.

In Theresa May, the Tories have got the leader they deserve. Let us dispense with the euphemisms: May is a coward. It is not a question of shyness, or caution, or lack of imagination (although concerning her personality all those things are plainly true). We are in the position we are because she is a coward, and utterly unfit to hold the position she does. No matter how shy, a moral person would not countenance her spineless behaviour during the referendum campaign, nailing her colours firmly to the back of the sofa while others led from the front.



The EU, of course, has got her number perfectly. They know she will do a deal at any price she thinks she can get away with, not because there is any grand conspiracy per se, but because she cannot even imagine taking any kind of risk.

We can all see that the ongoing ‘negotiations’ are just a series of miserable capitulations that will leave this country in an even worse position than it was as a fully-fledged EU member. Yesterday’s farce was not, of course, really about Ireland at all, it was instead about locking the whole of the UK into the single market in all but name in perpetuity. The text concerning ‘lack of divergence’ or ‘alignment’ failing agreement was a way of copper-fastening Michel Barnier’s demanded trade deal – to which May will, of course, accede in the coming weeks – that Britain should not in any material way diverge from the EU regulatory regime. Essentially in the single market and forced to pay £50billion for the privilege. Nice work, Theresa.

Imagine a scenario, say, three years from now: Britain is out of the EU but has accepted ‘alignment’ over Ireland and a trade agreement with the EU that essentially shackles us to its existing regulatory regime. A new British Prime Minister is in charge and wishes to diverge from EU regulation in some area or other. Immediately threatening noises emanate from Brussels, saying that such a move runs counter to the agreed trade deal and Britain risks losing trade instantly with the EU should it go down that road. Across the Irish Sea, Ireland and especially Sinn Fein start to warn darkly about ‘threats to stability’ and undermining the ‘Good Friday Agreement’. Circumventing such concerns by cutting Ulster adrift will inevitably inflame tensions in Scotland and Gibraltar who demand the same privileges. Between a rock and a hard place, the British Government sees that it is just not worth the candle. The forces of inertia will be enormous.

It gets worse. Who is to say that the EU will stop there? It could go on demanding further concessions from Britain based on new regulatory demands, otherwise it may be forced to ‘review’ existing agreements. We will be, in effect, be an EU colony, to be pitied and laughed at.

On June 23 last year, Britons took the exceptionally brave decision to escape their EU prison. Theresa May is determined to march us straight back in, and lock the door for ever.

Andrew Cadman

  • digitaurus

    The scales are yet to fall from your eyes – it is far worse than that. Who said anything about offering the UK a trade deal? The Irish border issue is about insisting the UK set up a hard border between NI and the mainland so that the Irish can have no hard border between the North and the South. There are no prospects for a comprehensive trade deal without the “four freedoms”, including freedom of movement.

    The Tory Brexiteers’ bluff has been called. If they will swallow this shambles they will swallow anything from Theresa May.

    The choice is simple: a hard Brexit or staying in the EU.

    • martianonlooker

      The Irish border issue is just another roadblock in the Brexit progress that the EU has thrown up. The EU couldn’t care less about Ireland. The EU will continue with their aim of derailing Brexit at all costs. The only solution is to walk away i.e. WTO terms, no divorce bill, no access to fishing grounds, no ECJ. Sadly, our traitorous parliamentarians would rather sell us down the river than contemplate the wishes of electorate.

      • Andy

        WTO should be the default position. Turn to the EU and say these will be the terms unless you want to make a better offer.

        And as was pointed out on BrexitCentral in an article WTO is probably what the EU want anyway as the tariff income, all of which minus 20% collection fee, goes into EU coffers and would go a huge way to plugging their funding hole.

    • TheRightToArmBears

      The Eire/NI border is easy to fix.
      Leave the border porous – bring all customs/immigration back to the mainland with a separate fast-track aisle fo NI residents.
      Then the Northern Irish, who voted to remain in the EU can enjoy the benefits they wished for.

      • Kaiser

        the borders simple

        do nothing

        if floods of “EU” migrants start coming thru start removing the rights of ROI citzens to come here

        they will soon get the message

        • fred finger

          There are three ways of getting to the mainland. Air, boats or swim. You only do not have to show any passport as proof of legitimacy if you swim.

          • Kaiser

            so its even simpler

            do nothing in ireland

            carry on the same elsewhere

            this simply points to the irish border non issue as being an EU catch 22 ruse to squeeze some more money out of us, im pretty sure the problem will go away if we could just find another £10bn

        • Roger Hird

          “the whole thing points to them never giving us a free trade deal anyway,
          cos if there was one we wouldnt need an irish border now would we?”

          You really don’t know the difference between a free trade area and a customs union, do you?

          • Kaiser

            I know what tariff free trade means and thats your remoaner wish not mine

    • Ravenscar

      It gets worse, spreadsheet has promised our money – deal or no deal.

      Un****ing believeable.

  • Pozieres

    Very well put, and pulls no punches. But I still feel that it does not fully reflect the anger, contempt and loathing that I feel towards Theresa May. What a humiliating omnishambles! The woman is a coward – she has no backbone whatsoever. We will suffer the ill effects of her cowardice and stupidity for decades.

    • captainslugwash

      Cowardice or duplicity. Words cannot express my loathing.

  • David Kane

    This is what happens when the the world of political correctness meets the real world. What could possibly go wrong? Mrs May and Amber Rudd allow 23,000 jihadists to come back “home” to England, many given rent free council houses and public sector jobs, because in their world all Muslims are really multicultural, just like the rest of us. But of course this is a fantasy (read: “2030: Your Children’s Future in Islamic Britain” by David Vincent, Amazon and Kindle). All Muslims are commanded by the Koran to commit jihad until man made law (democracy) is replaced by Sharia law and every single opinion poll taken (Comres, YouGov) shows that the vast majority of “British” Muslims under the age of 30 hold this position, and are willing to act on it. How ironic if these Islamic suicide bombers were just back from Syria; will they lose their rent free council houses now they’ve tried to murder the prime minister? Don’t bet on it. Every single deluded political fool who has welcomed Muslims into Britain is now a target, as is our democracy and our civilization. Will this bring an end to continued mass Muslim immigration or more bollards around everything except for our borders? The answer is an immediate end to all Muslim immigration, even if all Muslims are not terrorists, and the deportation of anyone committing or assisting in a terrorist act. What will happen is nothing, or more diversity shoved down the throat of a public already gagging on government lies about Islam. Britain is finished.

    • perdix

      Amazing piece of froth.

    • martianonlooker

      Not that I doubt that Jihadis would be eager to bump off the PM, I am however a cynic. Just a couple of days after her most humiliating bit of back-tracking yet and her reputation is circling the pan.
      Cue a meeting of her advisors: “A peerage to anyone that can get me out of this Fubar”.
      “I have a cunning plan” witters one…..so out goes another foiled Jihadi plot. probably a couple of bemused Pakistanis sitting in the pokey saying;” it was only a butter knife for my chappatti”. Released without charges in a couple of weeks.

      • David Kane

        Is that what happened in Manchester as well? Idiot.

  • Agreed completely.
    She is a lacklustre fool – she should have taken the line, there’s the £50 billion. You have one month to deliver a trade deal. But she, like most of Westminster and Whitehall, lacks the ability to fight.
    At what point do the 17 million who voted out (most of whom did so knowing that a “hard Brexit” was on the cards) take a stroll to Westminster to remind its incumbents of their obligations.
    Where can I join the DUP.

  • Bik Byro

    Splendid article. Theresa May has achieved the almost impossible accomplishment of making Remainers and Brexiteers equally cheesed off with her.

  • Right_herbert

    Margaret Thatcher would never have put up with this.

    • TheRightToArmBears

      She still sent one of the four bills, ceding our sovereignty to Brussels, to the palace for Brenda to happily sign into an Act of Parliament, making her German ancestors happy.

      • antikato

        Her German ancestors?

        Oh, you mean Edward VII, Queen Victoria and Albert’s first son, born in Buckingham Palace in 1841 and Prince of Wales for sixty years before his accession to the throne.

        In those less enlightened times people took their father’s name.

        • TheRightToArmBears

          So if a cat has kittens in a stable that makes them horses?
          BTW was you Dad’s name Hirohito?

        • Bik Byro

          Life is short. I wouldn’t waste more than 5 minutes on The Right To A Bare Ars e.

  • PierrePendre

    The Brexit negotiations look like so much fumbling under a blanket. Every so often, a hand comes out from under the blanket waving a piece of paper that might say this or might say that and people protest that, wait a minute, this is not what we voted for. Perception matters and the perception is that at each stage, the government loses ground. We have the misfortune to be led by a prime minister who has sacrificed her credibility and in whom trust that she wants to deliver the Brexit that a majority voted for constantly diminishes. We do not even know whether Mrs May is her own woman. First she was in thrall to Nick Timothy and Fiona Hill. Now we are told she is teleguided by Heywood and Robbins. Tony Blair is working actively to reverse Brexit. What exactly is he up to and with whom? None of these people is elected and whatever they are doing also takes place under the blanket. If Jean-Claude Juncker condescendingly praises the British prime minister as a tough negotiator, it is a sure sign that he is confident that he has her measure. Whatever gloss is put on Monday’s events, it is clear that the British government got another black eye and that Mrs May was a loser either because she is too weak politically to hold the line or because, as a Remainer at heart, she is psychologically disposed to give way. In this existential struggle between the London establishment and the democratically expessed wish of the British people, the former have all of the actual power, both visible and invisible. It is of course correct to say that a negotiation constantly changes shape but the suspicion is that Mrs May is manipulating a betrayal and that the longer she remains in office, the harder it is for Leavers to regain the initiative which appears to be gradually slipping out of their grasp. The referendum question was in or out. It wasn’t half in or half out or any other version thereof. Every prime minister is replaced eventually and the fact that there is no consensus in favour of any of the alternatives shouldn’t prevent the candidates fighting it out with the Tory membership insisting the winner must be a committed Brexiteer. It needs to happen now.

    • Will Martin

      Very well said.

      The whole body language between Juncker and May on Monday was that she had given way, and she seemed so grateful for the faint praise he gave her

      I keep waiting for her to show some mettle, some resistance, but it never happens.

  • Sgt_Bilko

    She’s a typical career politician in Westminster and I despise the Conservative party for inserting her as PM following the referendum. Leadsom might have made a few minor mistakes early on, but she would run rings around Corbyn in any election and then pushed through Brexit with real passion. The whole country would be buzzing with positivity, apart from a few miserable remainiacs.

    The Conservative party has been looking for a backbone since 1990 and I think it’s time to reflect on the very real consequences of that.

    • grumpyashell

      Think you are right there May will have reinvigorated UKIP. Why not she has made the Conservatives a party not to be trusted. So what party do you vote for:-
      1) Labour…you are having a laugh.
      2) Libdums….never
      3) anyone else ?
      4) UKIP…why not

      • Sgt_Bilko

        Cameron went out of his way to insult and ridicule traditional Tory voters, so I was one of the 4 million UKIP voters in 2015, along with the rest of my family, who had always voted Conservative for generations. Cameron now looks like a genius compared to May.

        At the last election there was no local UKIP candidate, since he stood aside to allow the Conservative candidate a free run. If he hadn’t done so, I suspect we would now have a Labour MP for the first time in history.

        Can you imagine what sort of election result the Tories would have had under May if UKIP supporters hadn’t lent them their vote to push through Brexit? What is she expecting after she betrays 17.4 million voters with her EU capitulation? Her cherished Guardian readers will never vote Tory.

        Frankly I’m surprised Tory MPs haven’t yet forced a vote of confidence in her leadership, because I know they always put the party before country and she’s clearly a danger to both. If we don’t get rid of May soon and replace her with a sound Brexiteer like Rees Mogg I am convinced it will ruin both the party and the country.

        • Godfrey Sandford

          Well put, Sgt_Bilko. Cameron was a plodding dullard of epic proportions, but he does indeed look like a genius compared to May. How true.

        • TheRightToArmBears

          JRM has supported every dullard Tory leader since he became an MP.
          If he really wanted to get us out he’d resign his seat and fight an election on a JUST LEAVE platform.
          But he’s a Tory and he’ll be a good little Tory MP.

          • Bik Byro

            And his one-seat party would win one seat. Yes, very sensible. Tell me, how exactly that is going to be more effective at achieving a strong Brexit than him staying a Conservative?

      • Bik Byro

        The opportunity is there for UKIP to seize. Unfortunately, UKIP without Nigel Farage is like Top Gear without Jeremy Clarkson, so I doubt that is going to happen.

  • Andy

    Long and the sort of it is the bloody woman is useless.

  • TheRightToArmBears

    May is not a coward.
    She is doing what she has always believed in – that Britain should remain shackled to the EU corpse.
    This has always been the core belief and creed of the Tory party, and adhered to by every Tory MP, even JRM, who has yet to vote against his CCHQ/Berlin paymasters.

  • grumpyashell

    Whilst watching/reading all the news on May and her appalling handling of just about everything,let me make a prediction:-

    Just about complete wipeout of the Conservative council base in the Local Elections next May !

    Now who do you blame when that happens ?

    • Jolly Radical

      The Russians, of course!

  • Jingleballix

    Brexit means………eerrrrr Regulatory Alignment

    • martianonlooker

      Should we rename it bRAxit?

      • Jingleballix

        Smarty pants…….

        • martianonlooker

          I have booked into a monastery to perform 100 flagellations as penance:)

  • bob

    It’s quite simple really, her brief is to save the EU at the expense of the UK, much the same as every PM’s brief since we got conned into joining this corrupt dictatorship in 1975.
    It’s not a coincidence that every PM in living memory has been pro EU.

    • SeeYouAnon

      She’s certainly behaving as if that is her aim. She appeared delighted to have done just that (she thought).

      How else can one explain the wish to have no other country worse off as a result of our leaving (except our own country, which can go to blazes apparently). Or the wish not to compete: when of course we have to compete, for there is no other way build an economy.

  • Debs

    Its beyond belief that May and the Tories don’t understand they would have a massive surge in support if they put an end to the renegotiation travesty.
    Just say we are leaving, come and get a deal.How hard is that ?

    • fred finger

      Because they will have to prove, beyond all doubt, that the EU have no intention of giving us a sensible deal.

      • TheRightToArmBears

        May and the Tories will accept the offer of a cup of tea as a good enough deal, and they’d be eager to pay another £billion for that cup of tea.

    • TheRightToArmBears

      65,700+ of us are trying to get a Parliamentary debate on just leaving the EU – via this petition –
      https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/200165
      Sign and paste it on every website you visit if you care about your children’s country.

    • Godfrey Sandford

      The Parliamentary conservative party appear not to comprehend that if Brexit is not delivered in full as promised, then extent of treason perpetrated by our elite will be impossible to hide or to gloss over. It will be painfully clear to everyone that our elite is working to favour foreign powers and to promote alien authority – all at very considerable cost to British people. Brexit betrayal will provoke and incite civil disobedience on a massive scale.

      • Will Martin

        The harm to the British body politic should they succeed is incalculable.

        Where once the EU was just disliked by many, it would instead be hated for its bad faith in making common cause with Remainers.

        And sadly, if FoM continues it is quite possible that EU residents might be resented in a way they never were before. Remainers’ actions might make real what was before just a fantasy of their poisonous rhetoric.

        Had the Scots voted for independence, I would have sincerely regretted the fact. But I would have expected the rest of the UK and unionists in Scotland to bend over backwards to make Scottish independence a success.

        The monumental act of bad faith by the EU and the Remain establishment in
        seeking to reverse the referendum will poison British political life should they succeed.

        I am not so sure about popular resistance. A million marching against the Iraq war failed to stop the tragedy. There is a passivity in British politics which the
        establishment is well aware of.

        But sullen resentment and bitterness will sprout in myriad unforeseen ways.

        • StellaJ

          Well said. I think this is very much the view of the silent majority. Realistically, we are unlikely to take to the streets, but the vocalisation in private of disbelief and despair with Teresa May’s so-called Conservative government is getting stronger every day.

          • Nockian

            But who will you vote for ? It’s the same sad story. Labour are very likely to go into the election with a manifesto promise to keep us in the customs union and single market. UKIP aren’t in a position to challenge and we know the Libdems view only too well.

          • StellaJ

            That is a huge problem, I agree. There is no alternative, and by not voting, staunch Brexiteers risk disenfranchising themselves – perhaps that is what the Remoaner anti-democrats want to happen.

            What IS the best response? Spoiled ballots, to show we are able to vote but choose not to in protest? Grassroots movement – no taxation without representation? I read and join the discussion here mainly because I am looking for answers. Even ten years ago, I never thought that calling for true (as opposed to PC) decency, fairness, justice, free speech and the democratic rule of law would seem like a counter-revolution in this country, of all countries.

          • martianonlooker

            Spoiled ballots. That wouldn’t worry our charlatans, they would do what they do in Scotland and elect via a list a la Keiza Dugdale.
            Nobody voted for her and her ilk, they cannot get rid of her and she swans of on celebrity guff to Australia.

          • Nockian

            I don’t vote at all, gave it up as a bad job. I’m beginning to think that all that campaigning I engaged in and then voting for Brexit, was equally pointless.

            The only answer I can come up with is to try and educate where possible; to counter an argument where it is not possible even by simply stating a disagreement with the view point; to try and live outside of the state where it is possible; to passively oppose legislation and policies without breaking the law; to reduce productive output to the level of subsistence; never to buy into the lie that paying tax is virtuous and to avoid paying out any more than one really has to (reduce consumption, buy VAT free; short the pound-where possible by buying precious metals; take every penny that the state declares is due to you-one reason why immigration should not be opposed is that it has the propensity to break the welfare state; finally don’t vote and do not spoil ballot papers, as that is still voting.

            I wouldn’t withhold taxes as the state will send you to prison. I certainly wouldn’t ever try any kind of physical revolutionary activity. The state will crush anyone who stands out, it’s very efficient at it, so, abide by the law at all times and never invite the states wrath.

          • Gloria Hole

            The state is efficient at crushing small numbers, not millions.

          • Nockian

            But it isn’t ever ‘millions’ that reject the state and a few examples easily dissuade the potential dissenters.

          • Gloria Hole

            I agree – just making a point that crushing descent would be impossible against millions of voters.

          • Mojo

            No one. If the majority of the country stopped voting there would be many new parties springing up. I suspect there are already people looking to make their voices heard and the vacuum will be filled. It will not be the hard right or the hard left who will succeed. It will be the sensible silent majority who have become so disillusioned with the hollow shell of Westminster that we will find groups appearing. This government may shackle us to the EU as indeed Norway’s Government did (none of the establishment tell the truth on Norway), but the EU itself is now cracking and will not survive much longer with or without our money. When the fissures become so wide the whole of Europe will change complexion. Some countries will revert to dictatorships and fascism but others will grow and create democracies and freedoms. Our grandchildren will see this. Not us

        • Mojo

          Many a war was started through political posturing. Many a nation unreasonably hated because of the propaganda directed at its leaders without any reason other than a political agenda (Russia comes to mind).

    • Nockian

      Because the EU know we can’t. It’s a good bluff if there is an alternative, but now we see that the Irish question makes a clean spilt impossible.

      • Only impossible from a Remoaner perspective. The border post-Brexit is the Irish Republic’s problem for their failure to follow the nation on which their economy is dependent. We could leave and have no controls on our side; it’s their remaining that is the problem.

        • Nockian

          They are a sovereign country.

          • Nivek Ecyoj

            Who? The EU?

          • Nockian

            Southern Ireland.

  • Dr Evil

    Walk away. Tell the EU to do one. Watch May’s and the Consevatives approval sky rocket.

    • Nockian

      We can’t walk away from the Irish question though.

      • Gloria Hole

        We can quite easily. If the EU wants to erect a hard border, let it.
        That’s that sorted. Next.

        • Nockian

          That would mean the EU acting as an invader on sovereign territory of course-sets a precedent, so, for that reason they aren’t going to do so. It will be up to SI to erect the border and if they don’t comply ? Well, we know what happened to Greece and the Ukraine.

          • Gloria Hole

            That’s an argument for the republic and Peter Sutherland to have with the EU. Nothing to do with us. I suppose the EU could always try erecting Golf and Romeo towers along the border and see how it goes down with residents in Crossmaglen.

          • Nockian

            As long as it doesn’t set off the troubles again.

          • Gloria Hole

            There’s no appetite for full blown violence again. The support from the communities for terrorists on both sides has – for the most part – gone. My own children have never heard of the IRA, INLA, UDA, UVF et al.

          • Nockian

            Let’s hope, but then again Communism is still a thing…so..

          • norman’s nonsense

            They haven’t gone away. They still commit regular acts of terrorism, punishments and extortion.. we are just not told about it!!

          • norman’s nonsense

            eu is using Ireland.. best buddies now, but only a few years ago telling them to keep voting for enlargement and the Lisbon Constitution until they got it right.. oh, and don’t forget taking over their treasury for a short while..

          • Nockian

            Of course. I don’t know what you had expected. This is my point. We were niave to think we could change the EU from the inside and are now acting naively in regard to what we expect from them now.

            This question should have been settled before Cameron even promised a referendum. We have legions of expensive Whitehall gurus and independent experts to advise the Government. What the hell were they doing letting Cameron promise a referendum ? The Conservative government has, over the last 7 or so years proven to be totally incompetent. The Government departments throughout the entire period of Blair/Brown/Cameron/May have performed in a way, that in a private company, would have seen them sacked.

            None of this is the fault of the EU. It’s the fault of our pathetic, weak, visionless, fawning, sycophantic and incompetent Government. We are Governed by a house of fools who would happily sell their granny, mother and the kids if it got them a chance at power. Thatcher once said about the Europeans “they are a weak lot you know, feeble minded” and that has come home to roost in our own parliament. Hugging hoodies, Gay marriages, Huskies, cultural diversity and all the rest. It’s all typical European faux ‘niceness’ which politicians don’t pay for.

            We have a fifth column right here in our own parliamentary building and people voted them into that position. Never mind leaving the EU, how the hell do we get rid of this fifth column that is stealing our money and our freedom ?

    • TheRightToArmBears

      But she has always been a remainer and she is always going to be a remainer.
      She won’t get us out.

  • Adrian Wakeford

    Were we not told by the more sensible Leavers that the road to Brexit would at times be bumpy? Do you really think the UK Government is not doing its best to negotiate with an EU which is undiplomatic and in whose interest it is to make leaving look as hard as possible? How else are they to discourage other countries to leave?
    Do you really think that a financial settlement of £40bn – £45bn over several years largely covering a transition period and items legally signed up to by previous governments is so outrageous? The cost of the NHS every year is £117bn and rising. The cost of social services and pensions every year is £217bn and rising.
    And finally, do you really think we are getting the full picture from the media when they are so biased on one side or the other, the EU seems to be trying to leak embarrassing information and the UK Government is avoiding the release of commercially sensitive information which might actually help its PR case?

    • Guy Family

      I find it best to ignore most ‘news’ regarding the Brexit negotiations. It’s either misinformed, misunderstood, speculation, hysterical, fake, spun or any combination of the preceding. There is very little difference between the BBC, Channel 4, Sky or ITV. There is a reason why the TV remote has an off button.

      • StellaJ

        You are so right. In this house we switch off BBC, ITN and Sky at all the times we used to watch the news. Because it is no longer News. And more and more friends and family are admitting they do the same.
        The EU referendum has revealed an awful lot about this country and that includes our currently rotten, biased broadcast media.

      • Mojo

        We have had no TV in any shape or form for three years. What bliss!!!!

    • Nockian

      Its 50 billion plus the fees over the transition period, so, closer to 90 billion. Our current defecit is around 50 billion and the interest we pay adds around 50 billion to the total debt which stands around 1.8 Trillion. Whether it’s worth borrowing such a vast sum is academic when we are broke. If the markets don’t like it, then we could see the interest rate explode on that debt. As it is we are in a very tricky place. In many ways paying out this ransom smacks of Corbynista assurances that nationalising utilities is financially neutral.

    • Mojo

      We have given this government enough support and benefit of the doubt. No one can seriously think that Mrs May is working hard to break away from the EU when her Florence speech was full of concessions and fawning to Brussels without once mentioning what we want for those concessions. OK we trusted the Brexiteers within government but after the utter sell out of part of the UK without the decency to talk it over with their government first, is beyond acceptable. This is full on betrayal and when one of Guido’s journalists showed the full paragraph to David Trimble, you could visibly see his shock at such betrayal. He actually said, ‘surely no British Prime Minister would agree to the break up of the United Kingdom because this is effectively what that clause is suggesting’.
      Well she was agreeing to it. And now it turns out the whole draft was written by Olly Robbins (no ambassadorial or negotiating experience) and Jeremy Heywood (arch europhile who thinks he is the true PM of UK). Both unelected. These two were talking to Brussels and Ireland and Mrs May didn’t think of including NI or indeed DD in the discussions.

      She is either treacherous or a useful idiot for the EU

      • TheRightToArmBears

        May has been both since she entered politics.

    • Simon Platt

      Do I really think the UK Government is not doing its best to negotiate with the EU? I’m afraid I don’t.

      Do I really think we are getting the full picture from the media? Of course, not.

  • Nockian

    The Irish question has revealed that the referendum was a horribly bad abomination of an idea dreamed up by the Teflon shouldered greasy piglet of a PM. A little boy playing with the matches of things he didn’t understand, who then ran away after setting fire to our constitution.

    The DUP have not saved Brexit, they have revealed the true nature of the EU; our relationship with it and the foolishness of referenda.

    Here’s the two problems:

    The EU owe us nothing, despite the claims of being best buddies, the reality is that we are leaving the club and we can’t expect to keep on getting the service provided by that club unless we agree to abide by its rules and that includes the membership fee. If the EU were to offer us a deal, then every member would want that deal and the EU would be finished. The EU is a political project hiding beneath a trade alliance.

    Unless Britain is going to accept real laissez faire capitalism, then we are going to have to have a customs border and certainly the EU will wish to erect a customs border somewhere and hence would be correct in doing so. That border can be in one of three places: in Ireland, In the Irish Sea, or parked in Europe itself. The first option will enrage Southern Ireland, the second would enrage Northern Ireland and the third would effectively mean Southern Ireland submitting to border delays whilst paying its membership dues.

    The solution:

    The option to rid ourselves of Northern Ireland is a possibility, but certainly not an easy one to implement and unlikely to be achieved within the time frame A50 anyway. This would make Brexit drag on for years, decades or centuries.

    The EU capitulates, ends its political project and becomes a simple customs union. Unlikely.

    Theresa May tries to sneak through a deal by issuing a note to the DUP a few hours before she signs a deal, with wording that doesn’t set off the DUP alarm bells, but essentially commits NI to remaining in the single market in the hope she can get a trade deal for the UK and then figure out what to do about Ireland.

    Or, we take an off the peg solution similar in nature to the Norwegian option, but, because we are net importers (Norway is a net exporter) we agree terms that allow us to set up our own external trade deals whilst agreeing to comply with the EU trade rules by not shuffling foreign goods into the EU internal market. It would mean we had to accept the free movement of people, but outside of the EU, the Government could adjust aspects of the welfare system to make it less attractive to the kind of immigrants who are looking for handouts/free healthcare and education. It’s not perfect, but would be better than a general election in which Labour promise the keep us in the EU as part of its manifesto-and the Conservatives, having be seen to fail to negotiate could well lose that election.

    • Gloria Hole

      “The DUP have not saved Brexit, they have revealed the true nature of the EU; our relationship with it and the foolishness of referenda”

      Let me guess. The one in 1975 was ok with you though.

      • Nockian

        I wasn’t old enough to have voted in it. Had I have been able to vote, then I would have voted against membership. Our family were staunch anti-common market.

    • norman’s nonsense

      The Treaty of Rome’s freedom of movement of Workers is acceptable. The freedom of movement of people – unacceptable

      • Nockian

        We can make that happen by making the welfare sieve have a finer mesh.

        • surfaceman

          Make it solid – no mesh needed!

    • surfaceman

      Or, we tell the EU to FO, go WTO and let the dice fall where they will. All we need are politicians who care about the UK … oops!

      • Nockian

        Imagine a world in which Governents do the bidding of the shareholders of large corporate multinationals. Imagine a world in which those same multinationals include the banks that lend money to those Governments and set interest rates. Imagine these multinationals as giant employers of Millions of workers across these Government jurisdictions. Imagine if these businesses got together and formed cartels and monopolies that used those same Governments to prevent competition. Imagine a world in which these multi nationals used taxation, Government contracts and monetary inflation to get back a large percentage of the wages/pensions they paid to their employees, as well as those not directly employed by them. Imagine a world in which these multi-nationals use the military to grab wealth in less developed countries and set both foreign and domestic policies.

        Now, just look at Theresa May and Philip Hammond and the answer to why they can’t tell the EU to FO becomes clearer. They are no more than department heads who are to be seen arguing with other department heads, in essentially the same company. They answer to their bosses and their bosses aren’t the public. It is a modern aristocracy in which the bureacrats are nothing more than the salesmen and showmen. If their faces don’t fit , then they are relegated to the back benches; only the trusty loyal servants of the aristocracy get to sit at the front.

        For the multi-nationals things are just overheads and profits. They see it that if they make money then they are doing a service for the public – the problem is that they don’t care how that money is made, or if it is made at all. They are the moral equivalent of modern day slave traders, except they have carefully hidden the means of slavery from the public eye.

  • Theresa May is copying David Cameron who had modelled himself on Chamberlain.
    Cameron, like Chamberlain came back from the EU summit with various meaningless concessions. Mrs May was even prepared to pay taxpayers’ money for similar concessions so that we could remain in the EU in all but name. She was even prepared to give away Northern Ireland to achieve her ends.
    UKIP should be taking advantage of this situation, but under their present leadership seems to have gone to sleep. Dr Cadman as a member should give them a decent kick!

    • Mojo

      I am a committed Kipper, but even I am wondering where the hell UKiP are in all this. They should be shouting from the rooftops and capitalising on May’s utter betrayal. However, there is a deafening silence.

      Nigel as always is banging the drum and Kippers are out protesting and campaigning. Where is our leader!!!

      • Gloria Hole

        Apparently Bolton is away on manoeuvres until the New Year teaching the SAS and Delta Force how to soldier correctly.

        • No man is indispensable; where is his deputy or deputies?
          Since Nigel gave up things are going from bad to worse. Perhaps he gave up because no-one else was doing anything!

      • Exactly. Here is a great opportunity and UKIP are missing it.
        Plus the defence cuts which UKIP oppose in the belief that National Defence is paramount.
        How on earth do they expect to win elections?

    • TheRightToArmBears

      UKIP has been demolished by the Tory plants and hatchet job. Nigel is working on his retirement prospects in the US and has lost interest here.
      UKIP should be ready to fight the next by-election (Lord, please send a heart attack soon and make it a Tory) on a LEAVE IMMEDIATELY/NO DEAL/NO MORE MONEY platform.
      But the party has no money – the Hamiltons have sucked out the last 4p claiming they always need a taxi from wherever to everywhere.

      • The mess up that May made over Northern Ireland should have given UKIP a chance to get on TV. The BBC always seems happy to have anyone who will criticise her!

        • Blazeaway

          They seem to only let Remainers criticise her.

          • What about Social Media. The left seem to be very active, judging by the so-called Twitter storms. I’m too old to understand these things, but surely UKIP is capable of organising something similar.

    • Blazeaway

      UKIP’s new leader has not gone to sleep. The party and Henry Bolton are campaigning hard.

      MEPs are intervening very regularly and the party is very active on social media. Most are speaking up in the Euro Parliament and are making videos to get the UKIP perspective across.

      Party branches are leafleting and trying to recruit new campaigners.

      Visit the UKIP website ‘news’ section. You will see that the party is issuing many media releases each day for TV, radio and newspapers, commenting on the daily disasters coming from the negotiations.

      Not seen it? Then you have to look at the nature of the pro-Remain media. The BBC, Channel Four and ITV were ordered in 2015 by the (I think) Electoral Commission to treat UKIP as a major party and to give it reasonable representation, much to the chagrin of the broadcasters themselves, the Tories, Labour, LibDems and Greens who complained vociferously.

      UKIP has now fallen back in the polls and the broadcasters have taken the opportunity to once more ignore them.

      Yes, we want to hear more from UKIP. Yes, the political conditions are creating a larger space for UKIP. But the party is now finding it very difficult to break through the TV company’s policy of ignoring them. Just like, in fact, the same TV companies ignore the Leave perspective in favour of Remainers. Part of a larger problem!

      • What would Nigel do in such a situation? Not sit back and accept the situation.

  • LB

    Most MPs don’t want it, the Civil Service doesn’t want it, big business doesn’t want it, the media doesn’t want it, the negotiations and the transition itself are being carried out by people who would rather remain in the EU, the fix was in from day one.

  • Tony in Southwark

    This is one way to look at it – but another is that the EU has shot itself in the foot and the Irish Republic Poodle through the vitals. A leek was made about various forms of words about how to AVOID a hard border in Ireland – the DUP don’t want one, the UK does not want one the RoI insists it does not want one. Yet the EU does want one and Varadkar danced to their tune (why? Hint, the promise of a smaller Net Contribution – not worth the rank stale booze breath of the utterer.).

    Let us recollect what the EU ‘internal market’ (the Single Market) is – it is the Regulatory Mechanism to protect inefficient production and commercial activities in the EU and allegedly to harmonise the disparate economies of its members. This gives a Net Import Advantage to the EU – (the Euro at below par to an independent DMark gives them an export advantage.).

    Now remember that the EU, its members and the rest of the world trade on WTO terms as well, but subject to bilateral deals between nations and blocs on Tariffs and ‘Regulatory Equivalence’.

    However, these EU regulations do not act as an absolute protection because of the WTO rules of ‘Regulatory Equivalence’, you cannot use some petty fogging small print to deny an offer into the Single Market of a like for like good.

    This is the reason for the EU Customs Union, if you are not a member of it then your Regulatory Equivalance goods are subject to the ‘Common External Tariff’ that is what.

    So if you anakyse the Weasel Words of Regulatory Convergence, Divergence, and Equivalance, essentially all that was being proposed was that the UK-NI would trade wit the EU on WTO rules – except that this would be subject to a bi-lateral Tariff Deal – the UK wanting full Most Favoured Nation (MFA) Free Trade (FTA) with the EU. I do not believe that the EU will offer this.

    I have no doubt what so ever that the Heywood/ Robbins / Treasury and sinister Hammond were trying to muddy this to claim the arrangement was open and worked for the EU and UK (that is indeed what WTO rules mean) but then latterly meant the UK would be subject to the EU regime – effectively non-member Membership. As the EU will not offer MFA FTA
    so we ought not to buy into their system to run a continuing trade deficit.

    Brexit will not affect the NI Good Friday Agreement by a jot – as that is actually between the two communities of the ‘Dreary Steeples ‘ of Ulster alone to decide.

    All of this means that the EU can actually agree to anything and No Deal is ever more likely.

    • Bik Byro

      “A leek was made” – surely that would be Wales/Plaid Cymru and not Northern Ireland/DUP ?