A new national recruitment campaign from ‘Girlguiding’ will focus on empowering women and girls and use the hashtag #KnowYourPlace, in order to ‘turn the old-fashioned idea that a woman should know her place on its head and to make clear that a woman’s place is wherever she wants it to be’.
Far from promoting choice, their message is in fact that ‘women’s place is in the workplace’. The issues ‘Girlguiding’ chooses to tackle are ‘around gender equality, professional opportunities and relationships and sex education’, thus their message is ‘work, sex and no babies’, with no awareness of the psychological effects on girls of warning them against the horrors of having children.



In a further irony, while encouraging girls to put their own interests first, thus sidelining the character-building virtue of personal sacrifice, ‘Girlguiding’ laments the dearth of female volunteers. Perhaps women are too busy pursuing their ‘professional opportunities’ – or perhaps they prefer to devote their dwindling free time to an organisation that does not specialise in the indoctrination of children in half-baked Marxist-feminism.
It may come as a surprise to ‘Girlguiding’, but we now have laws against sex discrimination at work, and for decades girls have been discouraged from having children and looking after them when they do, therefore they are campaigning against their own ‘straw man’ (sorry, ‘straw woman’). Women have never been forbidden from going out to work – indeed, Lord Shaftesbury and other reformers fought for years to exclude women and children from the workforce, where they suffered ruthless exploitation, on enlightened, compassionate grounds. But using the pretext of combating the non-existent Victorian patriarchy, ‘Girlguiding’ will be discussing with girls ‘questions they may not be happy to raise at school or home’, involving ‘body issues and sex education’. In other words, ‘don’t trust your parents’. And yet parents are guided by their sacrificial love for their own children; guide leaders appear to want to infuse their own feminist message in other people’s children, guided by a quite different set of values.

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