Can teachers be trusted to teach about sex and relationships?’ asked Joe Baron in the Spectator recently. Not if Heavers Farm Primary School in Croydon is any indication.

Last year it gained national media attention when Izzy Montague’s five-year-old son was forced to take part in an LGBT Pride parade. Izzy complained, as did other parents, but they were ‘ignored and silenced’, the Christian Legal Centre reports. Izzy’s son was then ‘bullied by members of staff’, leaving her with little choice but to move him to a different school.

Well, it seems the school has been at it again. The headteacher, Susan Papas, has excluded ten-year-old Kaysey Francis-Austin and her friend Farrell Spence for five days. Their crime? Daring to criticise the LGBT material they were being bombarded with in class during ‘Pride month’ in June. 

‘Bombarded’ sound like over-statement? Then consider this. They were required to do rainbow colouring in art lessons, LGBT-themed maths lessons with problem-solving about gay relationships, and, in English, to write to MPs to say that people should be encouraged to ‘come out’.

They have also been required to watch or listen to a number of children’s stories which promote same-sex relationships and transgenderism, such as ‘Tango Makes Three’.

As well as excluding the pupils (a punishment usually reserved for those who assault a teacher), Ms Papas contacted the police, social services, the government’s counter-terrorism body, and reported the church that one of the children’s families attends for a ‘hate crime’.

When the incident happened (the details of which are disputed) the headteacher promptly arrived in the classroom to shout at Kaysey and Farrell, declaring them ‘a disappointment to the school’.

She then interrogated them in separate rooms and kept them in isolation for five hours before allowing them to go home in tears.

Following the period of exclusion, Kaysey returned to school to discover that the headteacher had told her classmates not to speak to her.

Here’s Kaysey talking about the negative impact LGBT lessons are having in her school.

If the government is worried about fanatical extremism and bullying around LGBT issues then it need look no further than this shameful example of how a state school has treated young children because of their beliefs.

Heavers Farm is no doubt unusual in the vehemence of its promotion of this agenda and the ruthlessness of its handling of any dissent. But we can be sure that similar, albeit less brutal, measures are being taken in schools across the country against dissenters from LGBT diversity orthodoxy. Such as the boy in Scotland in June who secretly filmed his teacher telling him that ‘saying there’s no such thing other than male or female is not inclusive’ and that he had to ‘keep quiet’ in school because his views were at odds with national education policy.

Is it any wonder that public acceptance on LGBT issues has declined recently in the UK and America? Militancy does not win hearts.

In this country we believe in freedom. The freedom of adults to have private sexual lives (though often we would wish these days they were more private). And the freedom to follow one’s conscience and religion in all matters which do not harm others.

Such religious freedom is a basic human right.

We need to get much better at getting this balance right and not persecuting social and religious conservatives wherever they dare to disagree.

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