David Kurten: May’s looming Brexit betrayal can spark a Ukip revival

Not for the first time, the mainstream media has written off Ukip as irrelevant, taking turns to ignore the party or to sling mud at it. Although there is a very interesting leadership contest taking place, there is virtually no media interest in it. This is the party that won over 12 per cent of the vote in the 2015 General Election and won Brexit for Britain in 2016.

Today the party is barely mentioned in the media. When it is, a false friendliness barely conceals the ‘schadenfreude' at Ukip’s 2017 election disappointment: “Hey ‘Kippers, you were successful in winning the Brexit referendum” – a sentence that BBC journalists must say with as much pleasure as if they were chewing glass – “but the Tories are going to deliver. So why don’t you just pack up and go home? Be happy: you’ve done your job, but leave it to Theresa May and her team to negotiate a good Brexit deal for Britain.”

Anyone who knows anyone in Ukip will know that this is like a red rag to a bull. Not least because it looks increasingly likely that Brexit will be betrayed while the biased BBC salivates at every piece of bad or fake news that suits their globalist agenda to keep Britain in the EU.

Kippers have never trusted Mrs May to deliver Brexit – she was, after all, a Remainer in the referendum campaign. She might talk a good talk, but her record as Home Secretary on immigration and policing was dismal. With every week that goes past, another small concession is made to erode the full, clean, swift Brexit the country voted for.

When she was Home Secretary, Theresa May consistently promised and pledged to bring net migration down to the tens of thousands, an aim she never got even close to delivering. She left immigration from outside the EU, which the Government can control, at the record high annual level of nearly 180,000, much higher than it should be due to sham marriages, family reunions and students overstaying their visas.

Britain needs to be able to control immigration from the EU so that the only EU citizens given a visa to work are professionals in shortage industries. If we could do this, net immigration would very soon sort itself out. But the continued flood of unskilled labour to Britain – often of ‘cash in hand’ workers – undermines wages of local British people, especially young people who find it increasingly hard to find an honest job. Even Bank of England chairman Mark Carney has said as much.

We must also become self-sufficient in skills, but this will never happen while there is unfair competition from cheap labour. Businesses are disincentivised from training local 16-year-olds when they can hire a ready-trained and more mature 25 year-old from eastern or southern Europe for less money.

All this perpetuates a vicious circle in which we do not train enough doctors, nurses, engineers and construction workers for example, which in turn reinforces our dependence on immigrants to fill the gaps that would not be there but for our failure to train our own young people with the skills they need to make a good living for themselves.

Home Secretary Amber Rudd’s latest plans last week offer no respite to the continuing demise of prospects for British workers and young people. By keeping the door open to more rapid, mass immigration for a ‘transition period’ of at least 2 years, which could be extended at will, the British people are being betrayed.

One of Theresa May’s failings is complacency. She was complacent in her election campaign and expected to win. She has become complacent yet again and believes that she can barter away the will of the British people. But she seriously underestimates the strength of feeling about immigration. Nor does she appear to have any concept of the negative impact of immigration on ordinary working people – it is not something she sees in her lovely Inner London and Westminster bubble where the only experience of immigration is one that suits the elite.

As well as the Government backtracking on taking back control of our borders and controlling immigration, it is not even talking about making the UK self-sufficient in skills as Ukip is. Its recent conversion to the religion of barking madness in embracing the maddest parts of genderqueer theory and forcing such confusing ideas on primary schools means that a new and fertile territory of reasonable concerns has opened up for Ukip to represent.

Ukip has had a difficult six months. The Stoke-on-Trent Central by-election did not deliver the hoped for victory, and this led on to poor results in the May local elections and the general election in June.

Yet, in today’s febrile political climate, fortunes can turn around in an instant. A party that was written off one minute can bounce back with stunning vigour the next – witness what happened to both Labour and the DUP in the general election. In the 2014 European elections, no one should forget that Ukip were the first party apart from the Tories or Labour in over 100 years to win an election. That was only three years ago, and it could well bounce back to that winning form again given the right conditions.

The party is currently in the middle of the third leadership contest in a year. This is not what anyone wanted, but it may just be the most fortuitous of timings. Attention is bound to turn to Ukip again at its party conference in September when the new leader is announced.

Ukip is the only party of full Brexit. If the Tories betray the nation, there will surely be another general election, and Ukip will be there once more to step into the breach and make Brexit happen.

Yes, the party needs to professionalise internally – it can and it will – and start to shout about their other policies – policies so good in fact that the Conservatives and even Labour adopted many of them for their own manifestos.

The last general election was billed as a two-horse race, but it was all about Brexit. Millions of people held their noses and voted for a party they didn’t really want to vote for in order to keep out someone they genuinely loathed.

If Ukip play its cards right, millions who voted or considered voting for them before may return. The next few months could be a new beginning.

David Kurten is Ukip’s Education Spokesman, a London Assembly Member and a candidate for Ukip Party Leader

(Image: Garry Knight)

David Kurten

  • sfin

    The strategy should be very simple.

    With the Tories and Labour, the electorate are currently faced with a choice between a NuLabour, social democrat party and a nihilistic marxist party.

    The ‘gap in the market’ is for an, un-ashamedly, conservative political party.

    There is only one influence you should take from the left and that is to get the media on board and fight hard and dirty.

  • Dave S

    Mrs May was always plan B. Many of us knew this and as you say reluctantly voted Tory. A big mistake and I regret it. At least we know where we are with Corbyn and as he is a hard left idealist is opposed to the EU much as Benn was. Mrs May is not.

  • Shazza

    Over at Breitbart, the senior editor at large Joel B Pollack told the audience PolitiCon on Sunday that Donald Trump won the 2016 election because of three words :-

    Trade, immigration and Islam.

    “He spoke about issues that other candidates were largely ignoring, and that’s why he won.”

    • Alan Llandrindod Wells

      For ignoring read, avoiding ,or, fought shy of.
      Gutless shower.
      Just like ours.

  • Bik Byro

    UKIP revival ? Doubt it. Sorry to say, but UKIP without Nigel Farage is like Top Gear without Jeremy Clarkson.

    • Mill House

      As a UKIP it saddens me to say that I agree with you.

  • Kit

    When Tory voters open their eyes and come to terms with the fact May, Rudd and Hammond are more Blair Labour than anything close to Conservative our Country will continue to suffer.
    The Conservative are party were lost long ago. Now what is left of the Tory Party will soon follow.
    Indeed Mr Kurten, UKIP are on everyone’s lips now.

  • TmWe

    UKIP is done and dusted. You could now look towards the future and offer solutions to stop Islam becoming the majority in the country, but you are just as cowardly as the rest of them.

  • Otto von Bismarck

    A transitional phase for Brexit isn’t a betrayal-it’s a necessary process for rolling back 44 years of political and economic integration (which can’t be done overnight, more like 5-10 years). By the way I’m supporting you as next UKIP leader largely because of this tweet (not a member however so doubt my support is worth much!):
    https://twitter.com/davidkurten/status/887209418198220801

    • Tarian

      As David Davis said at a H of C Brexit Committee.
      “There is no logic to discussing transitional arrangements until one has agreed start and end points.”
      He added (roughly) :
      “That if there is little change there should be little need for such transition. And as the UK is already compliant in most areas of Trade, there may be little need for such transition”.

      Thus it becomes ever clearer that most talk about “transition” comes from Remainers hoping to thwart democracy.

      • Otto von Bismarck

        Silly argument.

        • Tarian

          One should leave it at “Why” (silly) ?

          1) You get in a car and point it north.
          You keep driving – but you haven’t decided your destination.
          Maybe you end up in York – but wish you were Liverpool

          2) You dig some foundations and lay some bricks. You keep building upwards (leaving a few gaps for windows).
          Eventually you stop.
          You still haven’t decided whether you want a 3-storey townhouse or some flats.
          (are your foundations deep enough ??)

          Yeah … right …… !!!!

  • Weygand

    A revival of UKIP would simply take seats away from the Conservatives and produce a Corbyn government or hung parliament.
    The only hope of a proper Brexit is David Davis as PM.

    • Broadwood

      With JRM as Foreign Secretary.

      • boptah

        or chancellor

        • Broadwood

          Yeess, or even PM!

    • Andy

      David Davis should have been leader instead of Cameron.

    • Who cares when there is letter difference between Labour and Conservative Party?

      I’ve long ago came to the realisation that things will get worse before it can get better.

    • The_Pr1soner

      This argument gets repeated ad infinitum. Conservatives say, ‘vote for us, or the other lot get in’. Labour says, ‘vote for us or the evil Conservatives will govern’. Round and round. They know the game, they’ve been playing it for so long. Get voted out? No problem. Sure, it’s sad and all, but we just need to bide our time in opposition until it’s our turn again.

      And we, the public, all lose.

    • Naviro

      Why should the tories get votes simply to avoid a hung parliament or a labour government?

      A hung parliament or a labour government would not be any worse than a tory government.

      Under the right leadership, a ukip revival will (again) be the political earthquake this country needs.

      • Weygand

        But a UKIP revival to having 1 MP or even ten times that number would still leave it irrelevant in parliamentary terms.
        Kippers need to join the Tories and influence a party that can make a difference.

      • JabbaPapa

        a labour government would not be any worse than a tory government

        You are grossly deluded.

        • Naviro

          Nobody should prop up this marxist tory government out of fear of a corbyn lead marxist government.

          If things have to get worse before they get better, I believe many people will be ready to accept that.

    • Mojo

      I do not believe that anymore. No one in the labour heartlands would vote conservative. UKIP should have fielded candidates and the vote would not have gone to labour. I think this message by the two mainstream parties regarding tactical voting is a sham. It keeps them in alternating government. If tactical voting helped win elections the LibDems would have scooped up all the remainer votes but they didn’t. This country wants Brexit and it wants it clean and quick. It wants its money back, it’s laws made in UK, it’s democracy accountable in Parliament. If UKIP had stood strong with its own candidates Labour would have lost too many votes. They would be in opposition and the Conservatives would be in power still, but UKIP would have had a couple of MPs who could have swayed the balance. The DUP would still support the government.
      The media do not want UKIP near power. The Conservatives are scared stiff of UKIP and Labour know that their votes were lost to UKIP. We played into the hands of the establishment. We got burned and we have learned a hard lesson. Now we need a leader who will outsmart the establishment, who will give the intelligent politicians like JRM a run for their money, who will chuck a snoop at the media and who will hold the NEC to account

  • Dr Strabismus of Utrecht

    Ah, it’s that issue of ‘trust’, isn’t it?

    Theresa May and others said we would have to ‘trust’ them on the Brexit negotiations.
    Looking at the sly machinations of Hammond et al, that is starting to look like a bad joke, and the British people won’t be fooled.

  • EUman remains

    UKIP has demonstrated before that it can radically change British politics, despite limited representation in Westminster. Now, here’s a choice for the electorate: a weakened Tory party manipulated by posh Remainers like Hammond, or a party that addresses hopes and fears of the ordinary people – led by Anne Marie Waters. Labour could once again become irrelevant. This is a battle for Britain.

    • UKIP doesn’t have any credible leaders at this time. Anne marie Waters will split the party (even more) and likely turn it something less appealing to voters. I also suspect she will land herself and the party in hot water faster than a WRVS teabag – and not in a good way.

      • EUman remains

        I understand your concern. But unless we get a leader who can speak her/ his mind, we’ll just be in the pockets of the MSM and political establishment. Be bold!

    • Naviro

      Anne Marie waters is NOT a social conservative.

      Her social ideology is that of a marxist. After all, she is a lesbian feminist pro-abortion activist.

      People are becoming repelled by the tories due to the fact they have turned their backs on social conservatism and embraced marxist social ideology. This includes the emasculation of men, the gay agenda – teaching homosexuality to primary school children, forcing transgenderism on the entire country, and the destruction of the natural family.

      Anne Marie waters has no interest in addressing any of those issues, given that she is a lesbian feminist pro-abortion activist.

      I hope people do not make the mistake of believing that Anne marie being anti islam means she is a social conservative. That is false. She only dislikes islam because of islam’s stance on women and gays. But she has no problems with any other aspect of marxism and indeed has campaigned for the national promotion of homosexuality.

      Many people are crying out for a socially conservative party that will not only deal with the islam problem decisively, but one that will also deal with all the devastating problems that marxism has created.

      Any party lead by Anne marie waters would not be socially conservative, it would only be anti islam.

  • Mike Fowle

    Coincidentally, I received today a mailing from Steve Crowther, UKIP Interim Leader, which is wryly amusing and self deprecatory. As he puts it: “We’ve not had the best year, have we?…..loads of Brexiteers lent her (May) their votes. What we hadn’t bargained for was that she would then manage to make Jeremy Corbyn look like a rock star, and weaken our negotiating position with the EU. Amazing.”

    I can vote for a party that is both honest and good humoured whilst still serious about our ultimate aim.

  • No HS2…No EU

    UKIP needs a new leader fast and they better make sure they can withstand huge scrutiny, as the left will dig 24/7, for dirt.

    Get the right person and there is a massive vote waiting, as the Tories under the likes of May are a disgrace and Corbyn should be under arrest, as a commie infiltrator, along with all his ghastly ‘comrades’ !!!!!!

    • StopIslamofascism

      Even accounting for election campaign pushback it amazes me how unprofessional and badly managed political orgs, all of them, are. Hillary ran a woeful campaign. Cons did too, Lab couldn’t remember what Abbott promised yesterday or what it would cost. Basic mistakes.

  • StopIslamofascism

    A realignment of politics is definitely on the cards. Lab could split. ‘Blairites’ form a new party. Remain Cons join centrist blairites and govern to scuttle brexit with a new referendum. Opening for Brexit Cons and UKIP to form a new party.

    • The Blairites should join the Conservative Party, then change its name to the SDP. No one would notice the difference.

    • The_Pr1soner

      Brexit Cons will never leave the party. It just won’t happen, more’s the pity. And they’ll never get to the top of the party, either, as they’ll be kept out by the Conservative Party’s very own Establishment.

  • Nockian

    The problem isn’t ‘immigration lowering wages’, but there are two fold issues

    1) That we have a welfare system which lowers the cost of migrants by effectively subsidising their wages. There isn’t a way to counter that problem no matter what quotas and point system promise.

    2) That we welcome immigrants who have no intention of integrating into our culture-this isn’t the fault of the immigrants, but of our leaders/academics who have systematically failed to value western civilisations advances through reason, individualism and freedom. This is further compounded by the fact we are at war with those who support middle eastern values, but we fail to engage fully in that war and have instead resorted to treating our enemies as refugees.

    UKIP are a nationalistic party, holding the old conservative values of Faith, Family and Country. This idealism is blind to the true values that made western civilisation thrive and as such they offer no answers against its likely collapse. That’s a great pity as there as some good people within UKIP.

  • grumpyashell

    There is an open door for UKIP if May and Hammond combine and do not get full Brexit. Not only that there are plenty of other problems that need addressing in this country which UKIP can use as showing themselves as a radical reforming party. What people want is hope,that is why Corbyn got more votes than expected,he showed an alternative to the last 30 years of sterile middle of the road policies of all parties. Hope for change,Brexit was partly that,the people were for once given a chance for change and they took it.
    It seems that the Conservatives,Labour and certainly the Liberals are stuck in the thinking of the 1990’s. UKIP if May fails to deliver,plus if it can get its act together could do that. Of coarse all the media,BBC and the usual suspects will deride and ridicule it,but that has happened before.
    Also I suspect if May does not deliver a full Brexit there will be many very unhappy pro Brexit M.P’s and their constuancies who could rebel and cause a split. They have been seen as voting cannon fodder for too long to be ignored.

  • screwtape013

    “She left immigration from outside the EU, which the Government can control, at the record high annual level of nearly 180,000, much higher than it should be due to sham marriages, family reunions and students overstaying their visas.”

    And didn’t she also do her best to boost the Labour vote by actually increasing the numbers of immigrants granted British citizenship?

  • martianonlooker

    Ever watch that Monty Python dead parrot sketch. Well Ukip is a dead duck. There are now only two options for Britain: BNP or Islam, take your pick.

    • JabbaPapa

      /roll-eyes/

      But then this is just another one of your moronic sockpuppet accounts, isn’t it.

      • martianonlooker

        Ask me again in about 5 years.

    • If UKIP is a dead duck then the BNP is a fossilised duck.

      • martianonlooker

        I have the feeling that you are correct. Do you have any solutions in the face of a anaemic pale blue conservative party; a crimson red labour party; don’t say Liberals, greens or WEP.?

  • Thomas Moon

    If you want to join UKIP, you need to declare that “I am not and have never been a member of the British National Party, National Front, British Freedom Party, British People’s Party, English Defence League, Britain First or the UK First Party.” Whatever you might think of their other policies, all these are, or were, parties or organisations opposed to Britain’s membership of the EU. Why not, “I am not and have never been a member of the fanatically pro-EU Liberal Democrats”?

    • Because in the past members from those organisations caused constant trouble to the party.

      • Thomas Moon

        Trouble, or embarrassment?

        • The_Pr1soner

          Both. Part of UKIP’s strategy back in the day was to manage their media profile. Allowing ex-BNP and others in would simply place upon UKIP a massive bullseye, with the words written on: ‘media, please savage us and link us to extremism.’

          Like it or not, it was necessary to disassociate UKIP from former members of parties labelled by the media as extreme. To do otherwise would have allowed the media to destroy the party before it could establish itself as a main player.

          Remember, the media doesn’t do Fair Play.

        • Either or both.

    • EUman remains

      Indeed. Just like those PC police tweets about reporting far-right comments on the internet. But not far-left (despite serious aggression from death threats to inciting riots). Playing by their rules, we’re screwed.

    • Tarian

      …. and its probably fair to say that a tiny handful of LibDems voted to Leave.

      Which of course prompts a more general point …
      …If one can belong to a Party without subscribing to ALL of its Policies .. isn’t UKIP bowing to Political Correctness by banning Leavers from its membership Leavers who may have made an uninformed choice in the past ?

  • CheshireRed

    I take issue with the last election being ‘all about Brexit’. It wasn’t. Certainly it was called to secure a Brexit majority, but when Labour announced they had accepted the result of the referendum that changed everything. It was a master stroke.
    That removed any necessity for voters (meaning mostly Brexit-supporting Labour voters) ‘holding their noses’ to deliver a Brexit (ie Tory) government. Instead, with Brexit safely out of the way people assessed individual party policies and voted along traditional lines. Tory policies were diabolical – with at least 5 absolutely ludicrous vote losers (pension triple lock grab, perceived dementia tax, bus pass grab, kids free school meals and of all things fox hunting. Fox hunting! I mean ffs!)
    Those stinking policies and a truly dire campaign cost the Tories, nothing else, and it definitely wasn’t a resistance to a ‘hard Tory Brexit’.

    • Mojo

      I think Mrs May just does not understand the excitement and vision of Brexit. To allow such a rotten manifesto to be put to the country when she could have pushed an exciting vision for Brexit and taken the steam out of Labours engines, was, I believe, an attempt to sabotage the referendum vote. She is not a stupid woman, but she is a remainer and she doesn’t seem to have any heart for Brexit. She sees it as a job to be done, not an opportunity to succeed.

    • JabbaPapa

      Fox hunting!

      I don’t care about fox hunting, but I do find that the lefty claims that it’s somehow “evil” or something are grotesquely moronic.

      • Dominic Stockford

        Foxes have been hunted since there were farmers. The left’s claims are potty.

        • peterthepainter

          The trouble is that fox hunting is toxic with a large slice of the public, many of the antis do vote Conservative, and even mentioning it in the manifesto gave the left something to bash the Conservatives with when there was plenty for them to bash the left with.

          There was also the error of the so called “dementia tax” and the triple lock on pensions. Looking at the funding of social care was all that needed to be mentioned not starting to give specifics – that could be done once the GE was done and dusted.

          The whole idea of a GE was fraught with danger let alone adding in a pathetic manifesto.

  • Mojo

    Whoever wins the UKIP leadership needs to do something about the NEC. We have had elections for new members on this council but they are still to stuck in the Londoncentric bubble. There needs to be a concerted effort to leave London alone and work for the country. Most Kippers think London will implode in a few years and have to rebuild. The City is already changing and innovating ready for Brexit, whatever the media reports. Businesses move and shake the markets, not the politicians. So there may be an effort from some businesses to relocate around the country because of the rail strikes and union problems.

    If UKIP is already building that stronghold in the North and the West Country they will have a good chance of shaping the future of this country. The hustings have been exciting so far. Everyone is beginning to engage again and social media is more useful than the mainstream.

    We also need to counter the government on their ridiculous genderbending policies as this is highly dangerous social engineering. We need to push the unions to support apprenticeships and training. We need in fact, to shake up the whole sultry system called Westminster.

    • It is the members that voted for the NEC though. So there needs to be a shift in thinking with its members.

      That said, it was the NEC that caused problems for the party’s only decent leader since Farage – Diane James. It was suggested that she left because the NEC will have interfered at her every step. Though it is also my belief that Diane James only entered the contest to ensure that another candidate did not get in with the intention of never becoming leader.

      • Mojo

        You are quite correct Charles. I voted for the last group of NEC members. We had a tiny spiel of their background and most came from academia. I decided not to vote for anyone who had any involvement with academia without having also worked within the private sector. You have to set your own criteria on choosing twelve members to vote for. It is not ideal and my own criteria may well also have been flawed. However, I feel we have too many academics one way or another in our ruling classes. Many are not intelligent or realistic.

        I did not vote for Diane James last time because, like you, I felt her heart was not in the leadership and she wasn’t strong enough to withstand the onslaught of the media. I felt Bill Etheridge would have been good, but again, the NEC would have thwarted much of what he wanted to do. I believe the NEC is still too Londoncentric and they want to woo the media. The media is not UKIP friendly or indeed UK friendly so unless the press changes and journalism becomes factual and not gossip, UKIP would be better to choose alternative outlets.

        We are now going into another leadership contest and if we make the same mistakes again of choosing someone who doesn’t want to confront the big issues we will be finished. my personal opinion is we should not choose a Londoncentric leader. We need to address the country and pull those people back to us. There are far more people outside the London circuit who are really fed up with being put at the bottom of the agenda, who are equally capable of making the UK successful. We are those people who need support, Investment and opportunities. London will always be for the transient rich and the migrants who work for them. But the middle classes should have the choice of working and living elsewhere in the country rather than having the daily slog in to the City. It is not healthy for them or this country in a modern world. If UKIP can successfully gain the heart of England and Wales they will be the party of future government.

        • When I was a member (now lapsed) I had a similar criteria for voting for the NEC. Aside from a “realjob” in the private sector I also excluded any one who had joined the party in the last couple years. After the 2014 saw a increase in “Johnny Come – lately” members looking to get a foot hold UKIP. This rang some bells with me so I discounted them from my choice. This did radically decrease my choice.

  • AJ

    “With every week that goes past, another small concession is made to erode the full, clean, swift Brexit the country voted for.”

    The type of brexit was not what was voted for and there was every shade on offer including leaving the EU but remaining within the single market.

    I suspect that the majority of those who voted ot leave did think they would get a full break from the EU including the single market but there is no way of telling.

    The issue is not May. All political parties are reconciled to exit for the simple reason they think anything else would be political suicide. The problem is that the reality of how complex, difficult and messy the process will be and the weakness of Britains negotiating position is becoming clearer and clearer.

    Farage resigned and May became PM because the brexit leaders either had no idea about how to go about it or had thought about it and knew it would be long drawn out process that could not live up to expectations.

    • polidorisghost

      “All political parties are reconciled to exit for
      the simple reason they think anything else would be political suicide.
      The problem is that the reality of how complex, difficult and messy the
      process will be and the weakness of Britains negotiating position is
      becoming clearer and clearer.”

      That isn’t the reason. They don’t want to leave. That is the reason: The political class has made its accommodation with Brussells and expects the rest of us to tiug our forelocks and obey orders.
      I don’t obey orders. I would elect the devil himself (Corbyn) before I vote for any of you again.

  • Muttley

    Come back UKIP! I won’t vote for the Tory party in its current form but I don’t want to be disenfranchised because there’s no worthy alternative.

    • The_Pr1soner

      I’ll never again vote Conservative. I wash my hands of them. The proper Conservatives are all kept on the back benches and away from power. That’ll never change unless the grassroots deselect the wets and traitors. I don’t see any sign of that happening.

      • grumpyashell

        Will only happen when local constituencies can choose their own candidate and not have one imposed on them !

        • The_Pr1soner

          And that’ll only happen when the local constituencies tell central office that they’ll quit en masse unless they’re permitted to do so!

    • Journeyman

      It’ll come back better and stronger after the Annual Conference this year. Please be patient.

  • Malcolm Jackson

    Vote UKIP if you want an Islamic UK.

    • Huh?

    • David

      Please explain your prediction.

    • weirdvisions

      The I in UKIP stands for Independence, not Islamofascism.

      • Journeyman

        Exactly so.

    • Journeyman

      You are writing complete crap now, you know!

  • bs

    I wonder if Mr. Kuerten understands the logic of his position that we need to stop immigration since we don’t train enough ‘local’ people because we can import cheaper employment from elsewhere. Quite apart from what he means by ‘local’ (Royston Vasey or something more sinister?), he is saying that the UK needs to make itself poorer so we can compete with those from whom we are in the habit of importing cheaper labour. Either that, or he believes in a magic money tree that businesses which have survived on cheap labour up until know will be able quickly to pay for more expensive and untrained labour.

    This nonsense is UKIP/Brexit in a nutshell – nice comforting Utopian ideas, but not a coherent thought as to how to bring it about without a huge short-medium term cost which they avoided explaining to those on whom it will fall.

    • Dominic Stockford

      No. He is saying that we fail to train up people in this country to do jobs in this country, meanwhile asset stripping other nations of skilled people because we’re too tight and too lazy to train up our own people.

      • Journeyman

        That’s exactly what DK meant, I believe.

    • Journeyman

      Are any of the other parties putting forward radical but pragmatic ideas to improve our country? No, thought not. But UKIP is.
      Is Brexit done and delivered as the electorate want yet? No, thought not. But UKIP knows that it is the most important near-term problem for this country to settle.
      We see that the Tories under Theresa May are giving ominous warning signs of backsliding on this work. UKIP is the only party ringing a warning about this, holding the government to account.
      I think your title “bs” is very descriptive of what you have written!

  • Mr Kurten, I saw your admirable and robust “dialogue” with Mayor Khan, re Al Quds and Hezbollah on London streets. I’m sure you understand the civilisational threat Islam poses to the West and to Britain, and wonder why you are not fully behind Anne Marie Waters for UKIP leadership. UKIP has two choices I would have thought, remain as you are and disappear or take on Islam and genuinely compete for electoral success.

    • Naviro

      I cannot answer for Kurten, of course. My only thoughts are that why should he or anyone else “step aside” for any other candidate, including AMW?

      If they believe they have a more effective plan to revive the party’s fortunes and believe they can do a better job of leading the party then they should stand.

      Quite bizarre to suggest that because you have a favoured candidiate that all others should simply step aside and allow a coronation to take place.

      • You have a point, but my ripose would simply be that UKIP can only wither and die now it has achieved what it set out to do. The obvious next challenge is Islam. If UKIP is to remain a serious party it must confront Islam. If it does, it could win the next election. If it does not, it is effectively over, bar loitering on the political fringes as a party of derision. Ask Paul Nuttall.

        • grumpyashell

          All UKIP has to do is rebrand,become UKP-drop the £ logo,then become a radical reforming party. There are plenty of other things other than Brexit to change. Tax reform,we have very complicated system which needs simplification,business rates,etc,boundary changes-fewer MP’s and Lords,reform of the Honours system,getting rid of the PC rubbish and getting common sense back into government,transport,defence,education,policing,smaller government,getting rid of quangos etc,etc,etc….there is plenty to do….all you need is political will to do it.

          • Journeyman

            What about constitutional reform, the voting system, the HoL, proper security and defence, paying off the ENORMOUS national debt, etc., etc. ….

        • Mojo

          Islam is indeed the next elephant in the room, but we cannot yet lose sight of Brexit. We must not replace a leader who pushed Brexit with a leader who pushes the button on Islam. We have to be able to hold many policies. We need to push again for educational reform and Grammar Schools. We have to push for NHS overhaul. We have to create a dialogue for terrorism and Islam but AMW is not the person to do that. She is good as a supporter of the leadership. Even Peter Whittle or Bill Etheridge cannot do that. Both are wrong for UKIP now.

          We need to look to someone who can hold the media to account. We need someone who fully understands that the media and indeed HnH and Westminster will do everything in their power to insult, ridicule and destroy UKIP. They all know there is a real understanding in the country for changing the present established setup and they know UKIP are in the strongest position to come back and create mayhem. They did a good job before but we haven’t gone away. They will not succeed a second time.

      • Journeyman

        I agree!

    • Mojo

      Paul, we went to the UKIP hustings in Torquay. Well attended and actually watched Peter Whittle, David Kurten, Ann Marie Waters, Ben Walker and Bill Etheridge all talking about the future of UKIP. David Kurten and Ben Walker came across as the most sincere and visionary. Peter Whittle was definitely pro London and felt UKIP needed the London media. Not very visionary we all thought. But AMW, whom we were supporting, was actually hopeless at the hustings. She had one message only. She did not seem to care very much about Brexit. She didn’t even ask to answer any questions other than those on Sharia Law. I did think she was a good speaker but I realised she was not a leader and would actually be detrimental to our future.

      We need more political hustings rather than TV debates. The ability of our politicians to answer on the hoof, to hold themselves accountable to an open audience rather than a hand picked audience shows who is capable and who is fudging cannot be underestimated.

      I rather think that is why Jeremy Corbyn was so successful with the ideological students. They all love a protester and he has had years of experience. Many at Glastonbury apparently booed him because they said he kept repeating himself and would not answer any questions. Not leadership material but definitely capable of whipping up a crowd according to the more discerning. That of course did not come across on the TV debates where he was let off so lightly.

      • I suspect Ann Marie Waters knows little else other than Sharia Law and Islam.

        I dislike TV “debates” (they are not really a debate) and just turns politics into X-Factor.

      • Journeyman

        Thanks for your insights and thoughts. Much to chew over!

  • Tethys

    This is rubbish.
    We always had the option to repatriate EU migrants if they have no work or prospect of it.

    • ChaucerChronicle

      Eh?

      That’s like saying, Californians can repatriate New Yorkers.

      • Tethys

        Yet correct.

    • JabbaPapa

      That power ended with the Lisbon treaty.

      • Tethys

        Its been there since 2014

  • Felt

    Daisy is an absolute and complete disaster for the UK. A leader in name only and a worse PM than even Blair or Cameron. And that takes some saying. The Tories are on notice that if they don’t deliver on the outcome of the referendum, they are finished. All talk is pointless, the people who voted LEAVE expect the political class to do as they have been instructed. Failure to do so will leave the door open for Corbyn, is that really what the ‘Black State’ wants ?

    • peterthepainter

      I like the nickname.

  • Dominic Stockford

    The mass immigration ‘requirement’ of skilled workers is not only undermining the need to train, and the training, of British young people. It is also stripping other countries of skills and trained people that they need every bit as much as we allegedly do. It is, in effect imperialism, but a reverse flow imperialism. Just as destructive, no, go back on that, genuinely FAR MORE destructive of other countries than the left allege that original imperialism was. Why does the left not weep at hospitals in Poland (and the Philippines) and other European nations which are starved of skilled nurses and doctors because we have bribed them out of their home nations, and brought them here?

  • Andrew Mitchell

    If the Tory’s do the dirty on the people, which is looking more and more likely everyday, then I would bet my house that UKIP will come back with an old new leader, Nigel Farage, and if that happens? I think both labour and the Tory’s will be in for the shock of their lives!

  • Guardian’s Quitter

    Sharpened pitchfork, check.
    Blazing torch fuelled, ready to go, check.

    • ethanedwards2002

      Rope..you forgot the Rope.

  • Odo Saunders

    May is not just complacent, she is downright incompetent! What makes her dangerous to the national interest is that she has no political hinterland, but is governed solely by self-interest.

    • JabbaPapa

      governed solely by self-interest

      As are 95% of politicians, local or national.

      One does get the occasional brilliant exception, such as a Churchill or a De Gaulle.

    • ethanedwards2002

      You can add Hammond and Sour Puss Soubry to that list.

  • Politically__Incorrect

    I agree with much of your analysis Mr Kurten, except for one thing; don’t assume that disillusioned Tory voters will automatically return to UKIP. Since Nigel Farage stood down, UKIP has started to sound more like a mainstream party; ready to sing along with the cultural marxists. It has tried to adopt a softer, more compliant image. The result was the near total collapse of the party’s support in the general election. The party needs a leader who is happy to stand out as a sore thumb and get peoples backs up when necessary. Voters are not remotely inspired by the cuddly bank manager type of leader, blending softly into the political backdrop. The party has lost it’s revolutionary fervour. No, please don’t become “professional”. The public are sick of professional politicians. Be bold, courageous and controversial. Waiting for the Tories to fail is a lame and rather contemptible way to go forward. Did Churchill just wait for the Germans to fail or did he get on and act with faith, resilience, and courage?

    • sylvesterthecat

      If the Tories were to betray us on BREXIT they simply won’t have a future.

  • Julian Flood

    Mods, I know this is very long but it matters. I crave your indulgence.

    David, you have inevitably attracted the AMW supporters with their ‘Islamisation is the most important problem now we’ve got Brexit’ message. They are wrong, so wrong that if they get their wish the result will be the exact opposite of what they intend. Rather than try to summarise what I have already written elsewhere, I hope the mods will allow the following. Stuart Agnew MEP is pushing the case for AGW, I have written an open letter about why he is wrong, and why her policies would spell the end of UKIP:

    Dear Stuart,

    To say I was surprised by your suggestions for leadership candidates
    in the latest Eastern MEP update would be an understatement. I can
    think of no-one less suitable to lead our recovery from the current
    situation than Anne Marie Waters. You saw how Paul Nuttall suffered
    from the contempt of the mainstream press. Imagine if those implacably
    hostile reporters had had a proper target, not just someone they could
    mock for a badly monitored website, a badly advised choice of image
    and a Scouse accent!

    Miss Waters epitomises everything we in Suffolk have been fighting
    against. We have smashed the BNP to such an extent that they have
    essentially vanished from the political scene. We have not achieved
    that result by banging on against Islamisation: we have pushed the
    message that if we close the borders and stop mass immigration then
    things will settle down. The vast majority of people in Suffolk do not
    distinguish between too many Romanians, too many Poles or too many
    people from Pakistan or Bangladesh. They want fewer immigrants full
    stop, less competition for jobs, places in schools, A & E, doctors’
    surgeries and housing queues. Associating with the EDL and talking
    about Islamisation will make any supporters we have left after the
    last leadership debacle head back whence they came, and you seem to be
    advocating just that.

    You may plead that she has been traduced and is bravely speaking the
    truth. Surely by now you have realised that appearance is all in
    politics and what matters is how a story can be spun. I could write
    the headlines myself. UKIP veers Right. EDL Takes Control. UKIP
    Candidate Supports Extremism. Would those headlines be fair? Maybe
    not, although I have my own opinion on that, but we are not talking
    fairness or truth, we are talking politics. To suggest that Miss
    Waters could do anything but destroy our credibility is naive at best.

    How did the proposed burka ban go down? Badly, losing us many more
    votes than it gained because the media pointed and shouted ‘racist!’.
    How did we do in constituencies with large immigrant populations, in
    places where hundreds of young girls were abused by clearly
    identifiable perpetrators? Badly, because the media twisted the tale
    to be about racism, not about justice for cruelly exploited children.
    How would we do nationally if we cosied up to the EDL and the Press
    jumped gleefully onto this most obvious of own goals? Disastrously.

    You say your chief motivation is to resist Islamisation. A Waters
    leadership, even her being simply proposed or accepted as a candidate,
    would make that impossible. In the same way that Powell made it
    impossible to talk about race or immigration for a generation, we
    would give people an excuse to avoid thinking about the inevitable end
    of the path we are on, let them dismiss truth-speaking as prejudice
    and racism. There is still time to halt the tide, but having Waters in
    the race would be tantamount to dynamiting the lock gates during a
    tempest. She is not Marine Le Pen, she is Marine Le Pen’s father, and
    even Marine is judged too extreme to join us in the EU. Just
    suggesting that Miss Waters is acceptable is immensely damaging. If I
    had my way she would not even be a member. Advocating tight border
    controls and the reintroduction of the primary purpose rule would
    achieve your aim but would present a much smaller target.

    If Miss Waters remains a member I will protest. If she is accepted as
    a candidate I will campaign and vote against. If by any mischance she
    became UKIP leader I would resign.

    Let me end on a more positive note.

    We need a central message which will resonate with the voting public.
    Although we were wiped out entirely at the county elections, I found
    that people identified with my tales of snouts in the trough,
    identified with our fight to stop unrestricted development, with our
    attempts to solve the desperate shortage of affordable homes.
    Emphasise those subjects and let people make their own deductions. Why
    unrestricted development? Because London is desperate to dump its
    surplus population. Why did we seek democratic control of the LEPs?
    Because they lack democratic control and could be open to corruption.
    Why is London so crowded? Because Mrs May was an incompetent Home
    Secretary and Labour opened the borders. Why is East Anglia slated to
    get 200,000 new homes in the next fourteen years? Because of Mrs May
    and Labour.

    This pattern is obviously repeated all over the country.

    Let’s push the truth. The Westminster elite needs taking down a peg.
    They are in it for themselves like Six Jobs Osborne. That’s what
    people want to hear. Local government is open to the charge of being
    open to corruption with limited safeguards and a close the ranks
    mentality. At local level we do not have the resources to investigate
    how corrupt or to get the information in front of the public, but if
    UKIP wants to draw back from the brink we will have to concentrate on
    that sort of issue.

    We are in a target rich environment. Let’s not choose our own feet.

    You want to combat Islamisation? Get us into power, nothing else will
    do. Will a full anti-Islam campaign ever get enough votes to push
    someone into Westminster? Yes, but only when it’s too late, and that
    MP would not be someone whose hand I would care to shake.

    • I cannot help but suspect that AMW is a “Trojan horse” for he EDL/BNP. It is only a gut feeling. However if she does become leader and reverses the membership criteria you will know I was right.

      My own fears aside – I agree she would be awful for the party and likely push UKIP further into obscurity.

    • Try posting that on a Breitbart article regarding UKIP – the feather will fly!

      • Julian Flood

        How could I resist?

        JF

        • That is if there are any more articles. Raheem Kassam is still in sour grapes mode. He currently plugging his own book every day at the moment anyway.

    • Liberanos

      I’m not entirely sure that it’s an error to campaign against a religion which commands its faithful to kill us on our streets, in the name of its god.

  • Pretty Polly

    Democratic mandates delivered under the usual rights without responsibilities universal suffrage system are leading rapidly to the collapse of Western civilisation and our traditional way of life…..

  • ethanedwards2002

    That’s very much what I was expecting. As the Conservative Party has now shot themselves in both feet, just how do you stand?
    Either become real Conservatives or step aside and let Steptoe take over…..here’s hoping for Mays conversion to Conservatism.
    Bye bye Blue Labour.