We have just had some day or other especially for women.

No, I am not talking about International Spoilt and Entitled Posh Birds’ Day – sorry, I mean International Women’s Day – but Mothering Sunday. However there was no media celebration, no fashionable debates, unlike its more globalist, corporate advertising (and therefore media content) friendly rival three days earlier.


Still, perhaps you cannot blame the powers that be, because proportionately being a mother is a declining vocation. In Western societies far too few babies are being born, and many more women in the West are now unwillingly childless, or are having fewer children than they wanted to.

Most of us know women who desperately wanted children but never had them. Needless to say this sadness dominates their lives and ripples outward, affecting the lives of those who love them. They turn up at family gatherings and celebrations and try their best to put a brave face on it and join in the fun, but in unguarded moments you can see the terrible deep misery and longing in their eyes, a grief many will take with them to the grave. For those of us lucky enough to have children, all birthday parties, Christmases and the like are tinged by the knowledge of that pain. Mothering Sunday is one of those days.

And few in politics or the media seem to care, let alone have a clue what to do about it. Well, that’s not surprising when our politicians and most of our media do not even discuss the matter, and for that there is absolutely no excuse: Europe’s demographic collapse has been going on for several decades. At the very least, you would have thought it would be suitable for discussion last week.

Not a bit of it. Instead, we are subjected to attempts by millennial snowflakes to make wolf-whistling a hate crime – something guaranteed to alienate men further from society and drive the sexes apart.

Small wonder that polls show that across the West respect for representative democracy is in sharp decline.

Good. Because ‘representative democracy’ is nothing of the kind, being neither representative nor democratic, and the decline of motherhood is yet another one to add to its litany of failures. As with so many other issues, those that pertain to the well-being of mothers or women in general show how the current system has become nothing less than an engine of social destruction. For instance, far from better representing the long-term interests of women, the new monstrous regiment of right-on middle-class female MPs have concentrated exclusively on issues and policies for women like themselves, and those in the professional middle-class floating voter demographics that they covet. The needs and desires of women in general, particularly working-class women living in constituencies where they weigh the Labour vote rather than count it, are probably more poorly represented now than for several decades. The severe long-term negative effects of working-class male alienation on these women’s lives is never mentioned, because the alienated do not vote. Even if reversed, the decline in marriage would take decades to take positive effect, which is useless to the ambitious politician. Abominations such as Rotherham and now Telford are covered up for decades, and discussion of the threat of Islam is avoided for fear of upsetting the Muslim vote, but heaven forfend that some middle-class journalist or politician has her knee touched or hears a wolf-whistle!

The truth is this: the current system skews debate and policy hopelessly in favour of cowardly, short-termist political decisions, often micro-targeted to niche groups whose votes carry far more weight than the vast majority, and that take no account at all of the impact on the broader organics of a functioning society over time. Having thus created heavily indebted and socially fractured societies, representative democracies have irreversibly run themselves into the sand. As the Brexit referendum showed, we need a parallel system of Swiss-style direct democracy to tackle the big challenges in society that affect women and men alike. Parliament must be stripped of its sovereignty. Until such change is brought about, all else is just noise, and no true social progress can be made.