Casting my eye over the week’s news, it is clear the two major challenges facing Britain in the coming decades are housing and the NHS. This is aside from the massive cluster-nightmare that is Brexit.

The Times editorial on Wednesday summarised it thus:

‘The Tories need the support of more young voters who do not see that they have a sufficiently big stake in the market economy. A lack of affordability in housing has simply not been addressed except by a self-defeating boost to demand in the form of the Help to Buy scheme. The younger generation of workers face the unenviable prospect of living indefinitely in rental accommodation and working for many years longer to support a rapidly ageing population.’ (My emphasis.)

Sure enough, yesterday the headlines were all about the NHS. A report by the Institute for Fiscal Studies said the NHS needs about a 5 per cent increase in funding, and 4 per cent in the longer term to do more than hold the current level of (overstretched) service. That could mean income tax having to go up by 10p in the pound within 15 years to pay for long-term improvement in the NHS, equivalent to between £1,200 and £2,000 per household.

However, the Spectator reported that ‘a settlement’ would be closer to 3 per cent extra a year. This is not enough.

To repeat the Times summary of the future for The Youth: The younger generation of workers face the unenviable prospect of living indefinitely in rental accommodation and working for many years longer to support a rapidly ageing population.

This is it in a nutshell – no wonder they are so depressed. We can certainly ask how it got to this point, namely, who consented to the Total Immigration policy implemented by Tony Blair? This cannot be said enough: Britain has experienced a population increase of over 5million in a just over a decade, from 2005 to 2016. The previous 5million took 35 years to achieve, between 1970 and 2005. Who thought this was sustainable in our current welfare state? The truth is that it wasn’t, it isn’t and it is the next generation, the rising generation, who will literally pay the price.

This is not helped by the fact that this younger generation seem to be on some suicide mission in that they overwhelmingly support immigration and the socialised health system. Now, they will have the privilege of paying for it all.

How exactly are households that have already seen cuts to tax credits and child benefit going to afford an extra £1,200 or £2,000 per year? That is a lot of money – it is not the kind one finds down the back of the sofa. In fact, in 2016 half of Britons paid no tax at all. Are these people now going to be able to find £2,000 in their back pocket? I doubt it.

How long can we go on like this? This is a genuine question. If our readers have any suggestions – sensible suggestions – on how to tackle this crushing burden on the rising generation please let us know in the comments.