Kathy Gyngell: This #MeToo witch-hunt will destroy women’s happiness

The demonising of men has to stop. Men are not monsters. They are not all sexual predators. Sex pesting is not a universal phenomenon. Suggesting otherwise is a gross calumny against the male sex.

Hundreds of millions of daily interactions between men and women have no sexual content or dimension. It is bizarre that this needs saying.

OK, at first it seemed it was just another day in the life of Hollywood's diseased culture. On this side of the pond it all seemed a bit of joke too – not least the hypocrisy of Hollywood’s wealthy (British-born) celebrity feminists either suddenly turning victim, claiming total ignorance or blaming it all on something called extreme masculinity.

But since then the MeToo hashtag campaign has not just gone viral, it has become a contagion. Women, it says, are not all just victims of previously unacknowledged male sexual harassment but have a duty to ‘come out’ about it. A veritable competition in ‘look at me’, 'telling and outing’ attention-seeking has followed. Forget the Rotherham sex scandal, the abuse of underage girls over years, complicit authorities. No, MeToo is about when my boss made a pass in the taxi.

It is not brave, as sentimental media comment would have us believe, it’s hysterical. And I use the word advisedly. Penny Lancaster is not really doing young models a favour by telling them it is not their fault. She’d have been better to alert them, and their mums, as to the name of the game - the risks for women of commodifying their bodies, something women have done for time immemorial.

And, hilarious though it has been to find that it is American Left/feminist Democrat supporters that have been 'outed' in this Weinstein feeding frenzy, and that it is Leftie leaning,feminist hipsters over here who are getting their comeuppance, their right-on feminist credentials no longer protecting them, trial by social media is not brave. It is nasty. It’s no better than a witch-hunt. That’s what MeToo has descended to.

The 17th century Salem witch trials led to summary hangings and one sorry soul pressed to death. The 18th century French Revolution ended in mass summary executions. Now #MeToo campaign ‘outings’ are resulting in summary sackings – of men of course.

So desperate are these reprobates’ corporations and employers to sanitise themselves and prove their right-on feminist credentials that they’re hanging employees out to dry on no more than a public allegation. That’s what happens with mob rule. Formal complaint is no longer required. Whatever you think of the hapless Rupert Myers (not much), Brendan O’ Neill is right: ‘Having a bad night out with a weirdo’, who lacks the social skills to court a woman, or having to say shove off to a married man whose overtures are unwelcome, does not constitute sexual assault. Nor is an apology a sufficient ground for a sacking. Remember Professor Tim Hunt who commented on women crying and the cowardice of his employer, University College London whose apology condemned him?

And what about the collective memory loss? Our law is frighteningly active when it comes to sexual harassment. What’s left for feminism’s new ‘victimhood’ to demand? Legalised sexual consent? Those with genuine cause for complaint have had recourse under the law since the 1997 Protection from Harassment Act was passed. Further legislation has since tightened up the law on sexual harassment in the workplace. Then, in 2010, the not-so-enlightened Equality Act turned sexual harassment into a form of discrimination, meaning that a woman today is lucky if a man dares even pay her a compliment.

Legislation already damns all men for the repulsive behaviour of just some and has created a gulf between men and women. This is what the ready accusers of #MeToo – our 21st century tricoteuses – fail to understand. As the management of male/female relationships becomes the business of the State, successful and happy relationships based on trust are finished.  Resentment builds and behaviour just gets worse. Society is finished.

Now what is left of trust, on which women’s as well as men’s happiness depends, the angry ‘MeToo-ers’, in their zeal, are busy destroying.

As a woman I am appalled. The option for men is either  acceptance of emasculation – a lifetime devoted to Nick Clegg-style ‘conjones’ honorary feminism – or 'going their own way' and turning their back on women or their family responsibilities.

Once women couldn’t wait to prove they were the same as men, sex-wise and work-wise. They became, for want of a better word, available. It’s taken its toll, not just in sexually transmitted diseases, cervical cancer, and a rise and rise in single parenthood, but also in regret and confusion. Women lost their sexual control over men. No wonder today’s young women feel worthless.



The sex revolution let men off the hook (responsibility-wise) and left women without any clear rules of sexual engagement.

Women need to wise up. They need to be honest that university and work are where they seek partners as well as economic independence. If they don’t want to end up with just the latter, if they want to be respected sexually, that is treated as ladies, then they had better start behaving as ladies.

Donna Karan was not wrong to say: ‘I think we have to look at ourselves . . . how do we display ourselves? How do we present ourselves as women? What are we asking? Are we asking for it by presenting all the sensuality and all the sexuality? . . . What are they asking for? . . . Trouble.’

Feminists with any wisdom and concern for the happiness and wellbeing of their sex should have defended her, not pressured her into apologising.

Kathy Gyngell

  • Phil R

    I would take issue with the statement that women’s financial independence is not at stake here.

    I already would not take on a woman if there was a suitably qualified man. This recent madness does not change things….

  • timbazo

    ‘#MeToo is about when my boss made a pass in the taxi.’ There are different ways of making a pass. An attempt to hold someone’s hand is very different from a hand up a skirt. I would see the former as acceptable and the latter as not. Then there is the refusal to take ‘No’ for an answer, as respect and manners would dictate. Finally, there is the use of financial leverage: the opportunity for promotion on one hand and the threat of redundancy on the other. In almost all cases, the abuser is misappropriating someone else’s money to facilitate the abuse. At the extreme level of sexual harassment, that with which Weinstein is charged, it is little different from the feudal droit de seigneur. Weinstein felt that he had the right to have sex first with any actress who wanted to get into Hollywood. No one but the aristocracy would want to go back to those days.

    Having said that, I agree with most of a well written article. Many couples meet through work and a total ban on workplace relationships would mean that a lot of happy relationships and marriages did not take place. The trend towards sacking someone on the basis of an allegation is alarming.

    Just to add that even when fighting sexual harassment, Labour cannot stop itself from being sexist. The LabourToo campaign specifies that, ‘This project seeks to enable women to share their stories anonymously.’ No doubt Jess Phillips would have a good laugh, were any man to share his story of sexual harassment.

    • MDOY79 .

      I have seen people make #metoo posts about cat calling, that is the problem with this sort of social media moral outrage campaigns. they dilute the actual problem to the point where no one can take it seriously anymore as everyone jumps on the great victim bandwagon.

  • Sean Toddington

    It’s Donna Karan not Karen, and no witches were burned in Salem.

  • Colkitto03

    Men lie, Women lie, All humans lie to a greater or lessor extent.
    The most disturbing aspect of this phenomena is that the accusation is is everything and due process is nothing. That is why the comparison with Salem is so apt.
    One gender is not intrinsically more honest than the other.

    When society tries to say they one gender is ‘better’ then is it guilty of the grossest sexism.

    • Phil R

      Yes no due process.

      But then we see the fools are usually pressured into offering an apology. Which is immediately taken as an admission of guilt.

      Apologies. Another part of our culture soon heading for extinction….

      Gone the way of truth and virtue.

      • Colkitto03

        Its a good point. Humans instinctively use apologies as a de-escalation mechanism, rarely as an admission of ‘guilt’
        For that reason apologies are very important for societal and relationship cohesiveness. This is being ruined. Society taught us for generations that it was gracious to accept an apology. This allows a sensible retreat from confrontation.
        Although I agree with the sentiment of Voxday’s ‘never apologise’ advise what does it say about the way humanity is going?

        • mudlark1

          I can never understand why people think these ‘apologies’ have any credibility. Who in their right minds would want an apology from someone who has been bullied into it by the twitterati?

          • Dant e

            `Who in their right minds`- Those looking for them to use as admission of guilt to further their agenda are not of a right mind

        • Apologies, are also a legal problem, at least in the States, they are chum in the water for liability lawsuits, another ill effect. Never complain, never explain, never apologize, or you will lose.

  • Fourmyle of Ceres

    lets just call it like it is so called modern “feminism”

    its not about making advocating womens right or making women “equal”

    its about running men down

    modern “feminism” is misandry rebranded

  • alecto

    An excellent article Kathy. A war is being waged on the male of the species. Feminism has had an adverse affect on society. Equality doesnt work – men and women are different not only physically but mentally too that doesnt mean one is inferior it means each has its own strengths and merits and we need to stop the’ one size fits all mentality’ bullsh*t!

    • lizmilton

      Have a look at “The quiet revolution rolls forward”…the numbered list part way through the article explains so much we see happening toward and being forced on us…

      The key objectives of UN Agenda 21 are also worth looking at…there is an explanation on

      Ukcolumn.org

      Without all the “diplomatic speak”…

      Apart from “ minor issues” such as…

      “An end to national Parliaments
      An end to western democracy
      The abolition of private property
      The abolition of private transport etc”… there is

      “The restructuring of the family unit
      Continuous monitoring and surveillance of the population
      The end of freedom of choice etc”

      Their free ebook is worth reading to see the Marxist future planned for us all..

      • Craig Martin

        And bankrolled by the usual suspects.

    • guestwho2

      Whatever assertive force feminism might have been it has been reduced to another key on the Victimology piano. One cannot be simultaneously ’empowered’ and complain of being the target of an assault, an attack, etc. Empowered individuals confront their tormentors rather than sprint to pull the fire alarm. Empowered individuals are individuals, not members of a collective. #MeToo is collectivism in five simpering letters.

  • Bik Byro

    As womens’ conditions and opportunities improve, feminism has to work increasingly harder and in more bizarre and ludicrous ways to try and justify itself.

    • Craig Martin

      Add dubious to the list Bik.

    • digoridoo

      Agreed. Feminism is like many single-issue campaign groups: rationally, it should aim to put itself out of business.

      Unfortunately there’s always a core of “clingers” (i.e. they don’t have a life) who just can’t let go once the aims have been achieved. The attraction/excitement of being a rebel trumps the celebration of having won, ergo the wheel is driven round again, and again, and … ad absurdum.

      • Usually they’ve found a way to monetize it as well. It’s their rice bowl, as we say, and they’ll defend it, no matter what. Also it’s a shiny squirrel as the whole Russian, Clinton, Obama mess starts to blow up on them.

        • digoridoo

          Good point. As the old detectives say “Follow the money.”

  • Frank

    All very true, but one has to keep in mind that this may just be a minority of women/feminists who have gone over the cliff edge? Female solidarity seems a fairly nebulous concept when you think of the thousands of women in some form of authority who did nothing / are doing nothing to prevent Rotherham type abuse, or FGM! I try to feel sorry for the ladies who got crudely propositioned by Weinstein, but speaking out only when their careers are secure looks fairly bogus as regards moral clarity!

  • Sean Toddington

    Big secret for all the men here who are afraid of a feminist ‘witch hunt’. Behave decently – particularly if you are married – and keep your hands, and any other body parts, to yourself. Follow those simple steps and you’ll be absolutely fine.

    • SimonToo

      Fine, but then there will be women who are offended by your failure to pay them the attention they consider their due. Surely you are not suggesting that there is some way you can win?

      • Sean Toddington

        Yes absolutely I am. Behave yourself and you will have no problems. It’s the best advice you will read on this page.

        • SimonToo

          It is the right thing to do, certainly. My point is that it is not necessarily effective – ask Lord Bramall, or get your Ouija board out and ask Ted Heath.

        • Godfrey Sandford

          It is perfectly possible to behave faultlessly & impeccably and yet nonetheless find oneself on the receiving end of a false allegation.

          I know this from personal experience.

          Anyone who says ‘behave yourself and you will have no problems’ is either very naive or telling a deliberate untruth.

          • Sean Toddington

            Nope I’m not naive. It is certainly possible to be the subject of a malicious accusation, though pretty rare. Also the police are adept at spotting that kind of thing and don’t like it one bit.

          • JabbaPapa

            Malicious accusations are in fact very common indeed.

          • Godfrey Sandford

            Not only is it possible, but it is much more common than you might think. I know this because it happened to me.

            Individual policemen may have serious reservations about the veracity of many allegations, but they are trapped by the system and following orders from above.
            Meanwhile, the Judiciary acts as if it supports the false accusation.
            Furthermore, any appeal to higher authority (i.e. the Home Secretary) is a completely ignored.

            In general, attitude of the authorities is to look the other way and to pretend that the problem does not exist. No one in authority is prepared to acknowledge what is going on.

            ‘Behave yourself and you will have no problems’ is false. There are hundreds of innocent men who have been wrongly convicted of sex offences and who are currently incarcerated at Her Majesty’s pleasure. It is unthinkable to imagine what an innocent man is obliged to endure when he is wrongly imprisoned as a sex offender.

    • Euman remains

      This is a naive view of the current threat to men. A student can maliciously fabricate an allegation against a lecturer. The lecturer (even more so, post-Weinstein) will be suspended and the student will be believed. Now you might say who would make up a story like this without foundation. I’d suggest you think about that one…

      • Sean Toddington

        References? And again I would maintain that if you have behaved decently and professionally then you will be ok. In my professional life I have seen several accusations of sexual misconduct, all of which, as far as I could see, were well merited. I have also seen a couple of groundless accusations of bullying but those went nowhere.

    • Dant e

      LP quote?

      • Sean Toddington

        It is. One of her best.

    • Royinsouthwest

      You ignore the problem facing men. A compliment or even a single invitation to go out for a drink, or dinner or some social event could get a man into trouble if the woman felt so-inclined. She needn’t even have anything against the man in question. If she felt angry about some other matter, or felt annoyed with men in general because of something some other man had said or done, she could possibly complain.

      That obviously does not apply in reverse. If a woman invited a man out for a drink most men would feel inwardly flattered even if they were not interested. Even if the man answered “no” the chances of him making a complaint would be virtually zero,

      About the only circumstances in which a man might complain would be if the woman was his boss and was persistently pestering him and he thought she would cause problems for him at work if he continued to say “no” over a long period.

    • Rob

      yeah right
      tell that to Mark Pearson after the witch hunt he received after walking through Waterloo station

      • Sean Toddington

        False accusations are very very rare, you can count the convictions for false rape accusations in the UK on the fingers of one and a bit hands. You really don’t have a lot to worry about, you need to get a sense of proportion.

        • Royinsouthwest

          You should have written “claims of rape that are proven to be false are very rare.” The true number is probably a lot higher given the number of acquittals in rape trials. Many of those will be because the jury, although suspicious of the defendant, don’t think the prosecution has proved their case beyond reasonable doubt. However some will be because the jury do not believe the story of the woman making the accusations.

        • Rob

          no they are not very, very rare
          suanders has already been caught out falsifying the figures on rape convictions.

          you need to get a sense of reality
          remember that you could be the next mark pearson

  • Great Briton

    Grown Ups don’t use social media. QED, anybody immature enough to use Twitter is going to act in an immature #MeToo fashion.
    If you’re not on Twitter it isn’t happening.

    • Kathy Gyngell

      But the main stream media report the social media – you can no loner separate the two. Together they judge, influencing culture, attitude and values the while

      • digoridoo

        And that skews perceived “public opinion” grotesquely. I wrote a reply to this article a couple of minutes ago about this. The hysterical tweeters and their MSM patsies are feeding what finds its way into law. And once it’s law, it’s very difficult to deal with.

        BTW A heartfelt thanks for CW. One of a few safe islands to an Odysseus trying to find his way home across a sea of left-wing vanity.

        • Kathy Gyngell

          Yes! What I should have added is the way this influences policy and then the law – take the Equalities Act

    • JabbaPapa

      Grown Ups don’t use social media

      #MeNeither

      • digoridoo

        I think you can be grown up whatever age you are – and some never manage it (whatever age they are). I remember being ribbed at school for being just so damned responsible. 😉

    • guestwho2

      It’s very prevalent on Facebook at the moment, I’m afraid. Cue the ‘avoid Facebook too’ posts but that doesn’t alter reality.

  • SimonToo

    Unless you have been predated by Harvey Weinstein and Jimmy Saville, and you have convinced Wiltshire Police that Ted Heath had you as well, your #metoo is pretty small beer.

  • Nockian

    There is this ridiculous bubble of feminista, moral outrage and virtue signalling that goes on ‘over there’. Turn on any MSM channel, watch some entertainment or read a trash novel and you would think the whole world was in a feminista frenzy. Yet, the reality is that in the real world of normal people, there are shaking of heads and eye rolls at the antics of the weird few.

    Most men and woman just get on with their lives without trying to pay much attention to the weirdos.

    • digoridoo

      The problem for your “most men and women” is that it’s the manic minority who have the highest profile.

      We are too busy working, paying for the house, looking after the parents, bringing up he kids to fight their crazy demands. Their relentless Twitter-supercharged self-absorption and the hysterical MSM feed ever greater perversion of democracy.

      The people’s choice of rule/regulation/law change is nothing of the sort. Craven politicians with the imagination and the spine of a slice of bread work out their virtue signalling, which finds its way onto the statute book. Very difficult to deal with that once it’s the law.

      • guestwho2

        A good point which further underlines the danger in the growth in size and scope of government ministries and quangoes in which militants receive generous taxpayer-funded wages to drip poison in the ear of MPs. Suddenly a government chartered to provide for the common defence, to coin money, to build roads, etc. is spending the majority of its time on bizarre issues pertinent only to tiny slivers of the population, usually relating to sexual matters.

        • Nockian

          That’s the problem with democracy in a mixed economy.

      • Nockian

        Most of it is difficult to make as law because it isn’t compliant with reality-that doesn’t stop the whim worshippers from trying to make those kinds of laws, but it makes them unworkeable and hence mostly unenforceable.

        We can’t be ‘everywhere’ but we can be where we are and act with total integrity of purpose. In other words we never allow anyone we meet to get away with ideas we disagree with, unopposed. We should never compromise our values and principles for gain, nor for prestige in the eyes of bosses, co-workers or anyone else. At the very least we can simply say we disagree without giving a further complex supporting argument, but we must at least voice that opinion.

        It’s the small compromises that kill us. The tiny slips of agreement we accede to for the placation of a boss, colleague, friend or family member. We should not concern ourselves with the war, we can only fight the individual battles we have daily because few of us have the time to act tactically on a broader level. We shouldn’t shirk the lesser because we feel powerless to act in the greater, because we are making excuses and evasions which feed the other side.

        • digoridoo

          I wish I could live my life by your admirable principles. The reality is that I can’t, without taking enormous reputational risks. I have no job protection and can be asked to leave at any time, without any notice period. That would shut off my source of income and, in the worst case, render impossible a change of customer, denying me a replacement. Those are the facts of my life. They inevitably colour my integrity around the people I work with.

          Most of those people are the normal and moderate men and women to which you refer. But occasionally an individual arrives who likes to play the victim role. Political correctness has become the leitmotif for all “safe” interactions between people except between consenting adults in the privacy of their own homes. That gives victims enormous power (and, because of my personal circumstances, absolute power over me). They may not be entirely conscious of it, they may not even set out to use it manipulatively, but it happens and I have no choice but to acquiesce.

          Very occasionally I live dangerously. At work a few weeks ago I encountered one of the modern breed of mid-20s feminists, great looking woman, stylishly dressed, good job, confident, lightly flirtatious, intelligent and generally good company. She dropped one of the standard observations from the sisters’ canon into the conversation about “men getting all the best jobs”. I dared to finish it for her with “…and all the worst ones.” Fortunately I had gauged her more or less right and she didn’t spew forth her outage. She instead looked at me completely non-plussed, as if her brain had never encountered that option. I lived to work another day.

          But normally I have to prostitute my integrity, the small compromises occur, we all slip a little further down the rabbit hole and I know I am colluding in it.

          I attempt to redress this balance by contributing intelligently (well, okay, thoughtfully) to forums such as this, where I can be anonymous. How effective that is, I can’t say, because these forums are themselves bubbles and I’m preaching largely to the converted. If you can offer me a way out of this impasse, I’m all ears. But I expect it’s not problem with a solution.

          I’m sure you mean well but your standards are unrealistically high for me, noble though I recognise them to be. The economic imperative cannot be ignored. I have no desire to live in a box under a bridge, smugly stroking my untarnished integrity. And I’m quite sure I’m not alone in this dilemma.

          • Nobody ever said it was easy, but he is essentially correct. Since I came to that conclusion I’ve been fired a few times, and my business has lost customers – some of them large, but I sleep at night.

            Maybe it’s easier as an American, we look back and really things weren’t that bad historically in 1776, but our founders hit that point where their integrity wouldn’t let them continue. And so we have the story of Valley Forge and the Continental Army parading through Philadelphia, naked, hungry, and unpaid, on their way to Yorktown. Somehow makes my troubles seem not so bad. There are plenty of stories in English history similar or worse.

            I don’t buy into the nonsense of those are my principles, if you don’t like them, I’ve got others. Do I slip and sometimes ‘go along to get along’? Of course. I’m human, and imperfect, just like everybody else, but as I get older, I do less. usually to protect other, weaker people that I care about, or work for me.

            You don’t need integrity when things are going right, only when you draw the short straw, it is the mark of a grown man.

          • Nockian

            Good comment especially ‘the mark of a grown man’. One must be a man by choice. Virtue means ‘manliness’ in a man and not as today ‘chastity in a woman’-nothing to do with gender but man as a class including both sexes.

          • Thanks. It is hard though, as we both know. Probably easier for me, the US is not the UK, and is more like it used to be from what I read. I’m semi-retired now, not least because I got tired of the nonsense. I don’t envy him, but I also say it as it is.

          • Nockian

            As the cliche goes, nothing worthwhile is ever easy. Travelling around my local area-in the North East UK – visiting companies and shops, it would be easy to think that all this PC liberalism nonsense has fallen like snow on a hot plate.

          • Much the same out here in Nebraska, unless you’re dealing with the big companies. Maybe it’s different in the cities, I try hard not to know.

          • Nockian

            It’s easier to find a bolt hole in the US where you can remain relatively untouched by Gubbermint. In the UK, there is no escape from the states tax plantation if you want to just get on with making money honestly. It seems you might even be better off turning petty criminal as it appears the state couldn’t care less about stopping nuisance crime.

          • Nockian

            I can’t speak to your circumstances, all I can say is that the option always exists “I don’t agree with you”. If someone insists on an explanation, then take the path of ‘Bartleby the Scrivener’ and say “I prefer not to”.

            In the end, of course it’s up to you, either you capitulate, or you speak out, but it’s pointless to complain about something that you won’t stand up for. It is not only a matter of financial imperatives, but the integrity of your consciousness – something never to be under estimated; as if it were somehow less prone to damage than ones body, when in fact it is quite the opposite. The more we compromise, the greater the power of the evil to which we object and eventually we become overwhelmed by that evil. It’s hard to have the moral courage, no doubt about it, but we have only one go at life, so we should have the courage to do what we know is right and let things develop out of that choice-it will likely never comes to sitting under a bridge, but it certainly might mean some discomfort.

          • martianonlooker

            Sorry to disagree with you but Digoridoo speaks of a world that I have had some experience of. Interactions with female co-workers is a minefield just waiting to blow up in the face of the unwary male. It matters little how polite, reserved and upstanding a male might be, everything rests entirely upon the attitude of the anti-male feminist eager to obtain a scalp.
            In my time, I have pretended to be a Muslim purely to avoid the hate filled feminists. Rattle off a few words of Arabic, tell them that it is Harram to interact with a female and although they may still hate, fear lurks within them.

          • Nockian

            Just tell, them you disagree and move on. You don’t have to go toe to toe to make your point. If you work in a place full of the irrational, then there is no point in trying to argue. It isn’t a debating society.

            If I worked in a place like that I would have found another job by now.

  • Cat

    Funny how actresses desperate to prove they got work on merit are lauded for their ‘bravery’ and 15,000 underaged raped girls are ignored

    • 3aple

      Its a real problem.

      You don’t want to miss out on the #MeToo bandwagon, but…

      You don’t want people to think you only got where you are ‘cos you gave in to Weinstock (or even pursued it as a line of advancement), nor…

      Do you want it to be known that you knew but did nothing, said nothing.

      .

    • Royinsouthwest

      If even a fraction of the more serious allegations are true then Weinstein deserves to be in prison. However the bandwagon is probably not doing genuine victims any favours. It could get to the stage where any woman who worked with Weinstein and does not have a story about harassment will be worried that people will think that he must have thought she was not particularly attractive.

    • Irene Elizabeth Brown

      According to the social services the 1400 little girls in Rotherham some as young as eleven were making ‘ life style choices’.

    • Budgie

      I don’t understand, why didn’t the actresses harassed by Weinstein speak out years ago? They’re ready enough to give their opinions on everything from Hillary and Brexit to that evil “carbon” otherwise. It can’t have been for the money can it?

      • LoveMeIamALiberal

        They didn’t speak out because agreeing to give Weinstein what he wanted got them fame and fortune. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if every interview with a Hollywood actress began with the questions: ‘Did Weinstein ever offer you a movie role in exchange for s*x? And did you agree it?”

  • Duncan Butlin

    Thank you very much for your support of men. The modern view of sexual harassment is wrong. In normal social settings a woman is in charge of sexual affairs. If she becomes unhappy with any man’s attention she should tell him to stop. If he does not stop he is sexually assaulting her. There is no room for harassment.

    For man, however, there is vast room for sexual harassment. Woman flaunts her sexual image wherever she goes. Flagrant behaviour on the street (including by young girls), explicit sex in films, dominance on television, and pornography on the internet. Man’s failure to set limits is to blame. Freed of this burden he would be able to set the world to rights again.

  • Tricia

    Maybe young women who would like a husband, a family and a shared loving relationship should get a hashtag. This would differentiate the real women from the feminazi. “No sex please, I am saving myself for Mr Right” might be a good start and stop relationship being allabout sex. There needs to be a way of wading through this morass that has been created.

  • Slowcoach

    Quote;
    “…..and has created a gulf between men and women. This is what the ready accusers of #MeToo – our 21st century tricoteuses – fail to understand. As the management of male/female relationships becomes the business of the State, successful and happy relationships based on trust are finished. Resentment builds and behaviour just gets worse. Society is finished……”

    Dear Kathy, many of them DO understand.

    They understand it only too well.

    Driving a wedge of fear, suspicion, distrust and hate between two or more of society’s pre-existing groups, and creating and inventing as many more other ‘groups’ as possible out of
    thin air (i.e. ‘trans men’, ‘trans women’, homosexual married couples, lesbian married couples, ‘black lives matter’, even the Grenfell tower protest rent a mob crowd they all come into the same broad category) they all have the same dynanic tactic, to destabilise, “divide and rule” -oldest trick in the book!
    Even the women who do not understand the above are nevertheless Lenin’s manipulated “Useful Idiots”

    How those groups who seek power at all and any cost, heedless of human suffering, must have hugged themselve when they realised the defeat and takeover of the free democracies – “The West”, if you like – might be accomplished without any invading army with guns, tanks, planes ete.etc.
    That army is already here – it’s us!

    Dear Kathy, “society”, as you put it, might not yet QUITE “be finished”, but that undertaking is well underway, and FeMarxists are among the beligerent’s mos important shock troops.

  • Politically__Incorrect

    I quickly stopped reading the Harvey Weinstein stories. Not out of shame for the bad behaviour of someone of the sane sex as me, but because I could see these stories were written so that editors could join in the anti – mysogyny virtue-signalling orgy. Yawn… All the usual female Hollywood suspects started appearing to tell us Harvey had touched their knee, or whatever. All this seemed much more important to them than the actual rape of vulnerable teenage girls in the North of England for example. So, thank you for this article Kathy. Your defence of us men against the toxic distortions of feminism is much appreciated.

    • Two-steps-forward

      To me, this has echoes of a time long past. My great grandfather was accused of indecent assault back in 1923. Refusing to admit to something he didn’t do, he spent many months on remand. Despite the accuser failing to turn up to court on occasion, he still demanded his right to ‘have his day’ in court. Finally it was the police that discovered the accusation was false and he was freed. Far too late though as the newspapers had branded him a ‘scoundrel ‘. A sad story indeed.

      • Godfrey Sandford

        A sad story, but I regret to say that I am not surprised.
        Judicial misandry is as old as Methuselah and as deeply embedded as anything in the criminal law.
        The authorities simply refuse to acknowledge that this problem exists.
        The level of wilful denial is off the scale.

  • Flaketime

    http://abcnews.go.com/2020/Entertainment/story?id=1526982

    Norah Vincent radical lesbian leftie Feminist living in New York got a bit of a shock when she lived as a man for some time.

    It’s certainly worth a read and what happened to her afterwards when the sista hood decided they didn’t want to hear what happened nor that their version of life was completely different to reality.

  • Debs

    As the mother of sons who have been brought up to respect women as equals ,they are treated appallingly by women.There is a culture of women wanting to live alone with any children and have a boyfriend on the side but not wanting to commit or have a man living with them .They are not feminazis they are ordinary females who think they don’t need men in their life except for going out.
    Generally its hard for them to meet females who want any sort of long term relationship. And the joke is …men wont commit ….Rubbish.

    • Godfrey Sandford

      True. The problem is that women are not willing to commit. Years ago, female hypergamy was constrained by concepts of loyalty, honour and common decency. Now that all restraint has been removed from the fairer sex, hypergamy means that women are simply not willing to commit.

  • rbw152

    I’m a man. Worse, I’m a middle-aged, white, heterosexual man.

    What am I for exactly?

  • LoveMeIamALiberal

    The #MeToo campaign is a massive deflection to draw attention away from the cesspit that is Hollywood. Weinstein is only the first chapter in this saga; the child prostitution allegations first made by Corey Feldman will re-surface at some point. The mainstream media is also keen to shut down the Weinstein story less someone start asking what all their Hollywood reporters knew (a lot probably) and whether they took favours from Weinstein to keep quiet.

    That Hollywood is a den of abusers should come as no surprise. Willie Sutton, notorious bank robber, when asked why he did his robberies said ‘because that’s where the money is’. Hollywood is where the young, beautiful people go seeking fame so no surprise to find the perverts there in big numbers trying to take advantage of them.

  • markbrev

    #MeToo served its most important purpose though – it got Alyssa Milano’s name back in the papers and social media.
    In all honesty I’ve always found the behaviour of women in groups to be, well, bloody awful, far worse than that of men. 20-odd years ago when I first started full time in the pub/restaurant trade, the behaviour of groups (6+) of women were almost universally terrible. I quickly worked out that it was much better for the staff if I made sure that large tables of women were only served by other women as if a table of men acted towards a waitress as these women did towards a waiter, the no doubt I’d have been calling the police.
    I moved to the banking sector some years later and ended up in an off high street processing centre with 97 women and 4 men. The uproar that happened when I put up an FHM calendar on my desk had to be seen to be believed, despite a preponderance of Chippendale, ‘beefcake’ and fireman ones on the ladies desks. Literally within the first month of starting the rumours was that I was sleeping with a colleague. Myself and this colleague just happened to hit it off, both being Scousers in a sea of woolybacks and having a similar attitude to corporations bull. When I actually started trying to get on (the girlfriend had decided we were getting married) the rumours of whom I was sleeping with then switched from one line manager to another as I got promoted. The final straw for me was being forced onto a ‘behaviour awareness’ course at head office for the crime of joining in on a risqué joke that I was the butt of!

  • PierrePendre

    There are quite a few successful female film directors nowadays. Sophie Coppola and Katherine Bigelow for example. What I’d like to know is whether they are hitting on the George Clooneys and the Matt Damons à la Weinstein when casting their productions? Is harassment of male actors by alpha women a hidden aspect of the feminist terror? My own take on the modern man, if Gyngell is to be believed, is that he spends far too much time feeling sorry for himself. But I have to say that I don’t recall any men like that during a 40 year working career. Gyngell says women lost control of sex after the 60s which is a questionable proposition. In any case, feminism is partly about getting it back by putting limits on male behaviour which is a natural response to the problem. My experience is that harassment at work was a much bigger problem before the 60s when girls often were treated as fair game and felt unable to defend themselves.