Kathy Gyngell: Ordinary coppers are neutered by their PC bosses

Who on earth would want to be a policeman today?  Not many, I fear. Seasoned officers are leaving the force in droves. They are the latest cadre of ‘public servants’ to vote with their feet by quitting their profession, following teachers, doctors and the nurses out of the public sector door.

The rate of attrition is alarming given the upward trend in violent crime. Resignations have doubled in just four years.

Even if there were willing and keen police cadets waiting in the wings, it would make little difference. The police have been rendered impotent. They too would find themselves neutered, operating with their hands tied behind their backs, walking the tightrope of the competing demands of the culture of complaint while defending themselves against those very complaints.

It is an impossible balancing act, however much they pursue the demands of the domestic violence lobby or say their mea culpas about their failure to prosecute enough rapes to placate the feminists. All the while they risk being put on trial themselves. It’s little wonder they spend their time signalling their zeal by prosecuting ‘hate crimes’; or by conducting 'guilty until proved innocent' paedophile witch-hunts going back half a century, instead of going after present day crime.

Given the politically correct environment they have to operate in, is it surprising that some senior police believe it’s their job to pursue a dedicatedly ‘multicultural’ agenda, like the diversity-genuflecting Chief Constable of West Midlands Police, who said her force would consider allowing a Muslim recruit to wear a burka?

The idea that they would help enforce Sharia law is no longer so far-fetched in these Alice in Wonderland times. The Metropolitan Police reportedly have already turned a blind eye to Muslim officers who believe female genital mutilation to be ‘a clean and honourable practice’ which should not be criminalised; officers who thought that female victims of domestic violence should have their cases resolved in Sharia courts.

It is ironic that 18 years from Macpherson’s indiscriminate and destructive accusation of police institutional racism and the endless defensive attempts by the police since to demonstrate they are not, that a practising Muslim female officer found herself driven to resignation by the police’s politically correct racism – a racism bred directly out of the fear of being accused of racism.

This she said had allowed an ‘us and them’ culture to thrive among some Muslim officers, who considered themselves to be beyond the law.

Since Macpherson, respect and diversity have been hijacked to promote minority groups as Niall McCrae argues here. Institutional racism has become an active requirement of multiculturalism, which is exactly why the police were backward in coming forward over Muslim child abuse gangs in Rochdale, Oxford, Rotherham and Newcastle.

Whose fault is this? The police’s? No. The fault lies with the political establishment for imposing these mores, including the very un-conservative Conservative Party. That is who.

It’s the fault of the righteous Left under whose sway they have fallen, who never turn up an opportunity to carp and cavil at the police, a pastime Theresa May eagerly embraced. What is easier than making the police the perpetrators and putting them in the firing line? What more effective way is there to emasculate the police and undermine their authority?

They are not to be trusted as their own bosses confirm. Cressida Dick tells us that stop and search will only be done courteously and ‘subject to proper scrutiny’. Has she considered how such appeasement of the angry anti-police lobbies undermines police authority?

The Met Police Commissioner’s carefully crafted commitment in last week’s Times ticked all the boxes. Her fairytale fantasy of defeating violent crime with niceness and good community relations was yet another restatement of the failed progressive liberal approach to policing brought about by the Macpherson Report.

“Policing is ever evolving,” Steve White, the Chairman of the Police Federation, warned wearily. “The struggle to meet these demands in recent years has changed the outlook for many officers.”

It was the understatement of the year. “Evolution” to a feminist agenda was demanded the day ‘discriminatory’ height and fitness requirements were abandoned.

Now with a 28 per cent female contingent, no policeman in his right mind would dare even question this not ‘very PC subject’, as one former cop put it:  "I will probably get a few abusive replies for this one, BUT has anyone else noticed that new cops just out the box seem to be getting smaller and smaller in both size and stature? If you were applying for a job where you might be required to dispel angry mobs and wrestle violent offenders, wouldn’t you think that in general the larger members of society would be at an advantage during the recruitment process? Let the abuse begin", he ended.

There is no room for discussion. Police might have evolved to survive the strictures of feminism and multiculturalism, but they are still left having to contend with its social and cultural  consequences.

They are the ones who have to police a world that has changed beyond recognition in terms of population size, behaviour, culture and criminality.

They are the ones faced with the behavioural consequences of family breakdown, rising lone parenthood and fatherless families. It’s their lot  to handle an ever expanding population that no one planned for. Is it surprising that the faster the population has grown the more police numbers have retracted?

Unprecedented immigration has not just delivered more crime but whole new rafts of criminality for the police to contend with - from terrorist attack to child grooming and abuse, from modern day slavery to people trafficking.

It’s a tall order to police, by any standards. It’s an impossible one while their masters - Cressida Dick, Amber Rudd and Sadiq Khan - put the promotion of political orthodoxy before common sense and the protection of human life.

What self respecting copper wouldn’t opt out for the simpler life as a private security guard or bouncer?

Kathy Gyngell

  • Uusikaupunki

    There appears to be more problems associated with employing moslem police officers than some being “beyond the law”. On television at the moment are several series of programmes about the police, of the “fly-on-the-wall” variety. In one of these, there was an incident whereby a moslem Pc driving a patrol car had got out to chase down an offender on foot. Within literally yards the policeman collapsed by the side of the road, doubled up and vomiting. After a few minutes of sitting down he had recovered enough to tell the camera that it was ramadan and he hadn’t eaten for twelve hours! Was he fit to drive a car? once again, law and order compromised to pander to islam….
    (And what are they thinking to employ someone who can’t go a few hours without grub before getting the collywobbles?)

    • Fred Uttlescay

      Yes, religious people are idiotic, aren’t they? Believing in absurd imaginary beings that tell them what to do. Mad.

      • Herbert of Bosham

        There have been Christian police officers for decades Fred. Stop trying to deflect from the fact there is no place for pandering to Muslims.

    • The_Pr1soner

      I saw it and thought exactly the same thing. It’s completely unacceptable for someone in that state to be serving a shift. He should have to take it as holiday.

      • Bernard from Bucks

        An unpaid ‘holiday’.

  • Colkitto03

    Great piece Kathy. We still have the best Police in the world but how long will that be the case?
    We need to stop putting impossible demands on Police officers.
    Deaths from stabbings are endemic at the moment, and the only real working deterrent is ‘stop and search’. Yet we won’t allow the Police to do stop and search. So more young men die. We need some real courage and leadership from politicians and senior Police officers.

    • martianonlooker

      “best Police in the world”.
      I long ago gave up with our police service (note, not Force). I doubt now that there are many ordinary coppers about, given that they now seem to recruit those most aligned to their leader C. D!c k of the Met. A CP, PC full of multi-culti, right on political thought. As Kathy points out, they seem to be of a similar physical stature as the MPS head.
      One just needs to read any newspaper and the comments of the various trials and tribulations of getting the police to do much, be it burglary, anti-social behaviour…
      The new breed of copper seems ideally suited to sitting behind a screen pursuing hate crime. The fault lies squarely at the feet of the likes of Blair, Brown, Cameron and May.

    • Labour_is_bunk

      Your comment calls to mind my naive student days (early 80’s). I started buying the Guardian (I grew out of that habit quickly, you’ll be pleased to know), but I do remember at the time it had regular apoplectic overdrives about the so-called “sus” laws, saying they were horrible. one-sided, racist, heavy-handed, etc etc etc….

    • Groan

      Yes. Clear direction and acknowledgement that we need a Police Force. A force that rarely needs to use force rather than one looking increasingly weak behind all its equipment.

      • Colkitto03

        Absolutely, it makes me despair that our police increasingly look like scruffy paramilitaries.

      • Greenlander

        Some of the very best Constables I worked with were women, and most of the worst Constables I worked with were also women. I’m glad I’m out.

        • Damaris Tighe

          Perhaps that’s the result of pushing hard for ‘gender balance’ – many excellent female candidates will benefit, but with them come the no-hopers who would never have made it without positive discrimination.

    • Tom Collins

      The Metropolitan Police do have stop and search but, must carry it out “courteously” !

      • Greenlander

        Of course they must, they are not your superiors they hold the rank of Police Constable which comes with a few extra powers of arrest and some responsibilities above those you have, that’s all. Citizens in uniform which they should always remember.

        Courtesy is an essential quality and one which will smooth many a path, the public have the right to expect it and with it it’s complimentary quality, good temper.

        Police aren’t exempt from using good manners, something which seems to be disappearing from our societal interactions. I’m not your mate, I’m not your bud, I’m not your friend, If you think so highly of yourself that you can’t drag the word sir out of your mouth, just don’t speak to me at all and then you’ll never get me to say, call me Greenlander.

        • Little Black Censored

          Citizens in uniform, but the uniform looks less and less like the clothing of a citizen, with devices hanging off in all directions, and often a baseball cap – whose idea was that, and please will they get rid of it? High-viz is another irritation. And you never see them just walking about; they are either clustered round doorways keeping important people safe, or whizzing about in cars, or (probably in most cases) indoors filling in forms. And with successive amalgamations (now complete in Scotland) they are becoming a gendarmerie. Alas!

          • Damaris Tighe

            To me they look like paramilitaries.

        • Frunabulax

          You make a very good point about manners and it sounds as though you were the sort of copper I would have been happy to assist. For too many years I note mostly rudeness and an air of faux-superiority from many cops, often laced with aggression. When some copper uses my Christian name to me I find it condescending – indeed when he is interrupting my life he is not my ‘mate’. When I am old enough to be the parent of that copper then not using ‘Sir’ is plain rude; in my culture and upbringing we didn’t mouth off to our elders or use their Christian names. Seems that the police obsess over being sensitive to every alien culture whilst sticking two fingers up to my culture.

          • Damaris Tighe

            Judging by modern police dramas (including those that pride themselves on accuracy) it’s now the norm for police to call anyone they interview by their first name (it’s the same in hospitals I believe).

  • rptrpt.rpt

    unlimited immigration brings diversity to crimes. isn’t it wonderful ?

    • Little Black Censored

      Acid-throwing, FGM, mass fraudulent voting, to mention some of the less grave ones.

  • Groan

    The Police have been put under more political control by the Police and Crime Commissioners. So the buck does indeed stop at politicians door. We also saw a huge proliferation of laws, frequently badly drafted, as politicians are keen to been seen to “do something”. So in fact we have an impractically huge array of offenses. A list of contradictory political sensitivities most obviously represented by the decade or so of “silence” about “Asian” sexual abuse rings. And a series of self imposed impracticalities such as the very obvious, fitness and size being very pertinent as now we have small officers festooned with stab vests and an array of weapons when they used to use the psychology of an imposing presence topped off with a tall hat! I was in Sheffield in the Miners strike and saw first hand some of the clashes between miners and police and then in the recent “riots” I had a grandstand view from my office. The contrast as the Police in the latter were “seen off” by the local oiks as they looted “Shopping City” was stark. It is also dangerous as it means the officers will feel impelled to use their weapons earlier in a tense situation (I’m sure this is behind the huge number of uses of “tasers” in the forces that have them.
    Our political shenanigans consistently undermine the police officer and speed us towards a “Service” that actually will be using far more force than the Police “Force” that relied on the psychology of authority. Having two good friends in the Force (in the days of height and fitness requirements) I know officers can become cynical through seeing the black side of folk so much, but this latterly was compounded by cynicism about the whole enterprise of policing. As so often in this country the institutions we have relied upon are crumbling from within. The winners as we know aren’t the vulnerable or weak, but the bullies.

    • martianonlooker

      “huge proliferation of laws, frequently badly drafted”.
      When Chief Constable Fish of Nottingham Police decided, on the advice of Women’s Aid that wolf whistling was a sexist crime and not one politician thought of criticizing her, was the day a further nail was hammered into the lack of respect for the CP PCs.

  • Paul Williams

    I saw a WPC in my road the other day. She was looking for some sweets in a neighbour’s garden that a local shoplifter had half inched from a nearby Tesco Express. She could not have been over five foot three/four inches, and was hugely overweight. I mean obese.

    So tell me, how does said WPC chase down and apprehend a fit 18 year old lad? I was genuinely shocked. I hadn’t realised recruiting standards had fallen so dramatically.

    • Labour_is_bunk

      The other day I saw a WPC driving a large police van accompanied by a male colleague passenger. She could barely see over the steering wheel.

      • Groan

        Exactly this is indicative of a number of problems and trends, certainly in my big conurbation’s force. “Clinging to the office” to avoid going out on patrol. Specialist units such as “tactical units” which concentrates the big guys in units dedicated to being “the Gorillas” to provide force ;and “diversity” or other units with officers who can avoid front line policing for years. Proliferation of weaponry, anxious officers demand and get equipped with an increasing arsenal of sticks, spays, tasers as well as body armour. All adding to the likelihood they’ll be used. In a strange way the local PCSOs look far more authoritative as they are smarter and are less hidden behind equipment.
        Simply looking less imposing makes a big difference when our whole ethos of policing was built on the idea of a “force” which rarely had to behave like a Gendarmerie and relied on the public perception.

    • Groan

      Yes its the insanity of pushes to be “representative”. Representative of what? As you say considering the majority of offenders are male and young it seems logical to recruit to deal with that reality rather than try to reflect the wider society including its weight problems. Hence the old sense in recruiting reasonably big people and retiring them at 50. Discriminatory, but reflective of the requirements to achieve “policing by consent” .

      • Greenlander

        It was 55 but now we have age discrimination laws. In my force over 60’s had to go for a medical, we had one chap who would cycle 35 miles to the medical dept for his yearly, it got to a stage where the doctor would stick his head round the door, see him in his lycra, and give him the thumbs up. I don’t know how they ever got rid of him, he was a good police officer.

      • Kingstonian

        The insanity lies in the statistical probabilities involved. If the Met employs 6% Muslim officers to reflect the Muslim population of London or 2% Sikhs likewise, the chance of any particular Muslim lad being apprehended by a Muslim officer is no better that 1 in 6, or for a Sikh, 1 in 50.

        If it’s about perception, then unless the whole force is on parade at the same time, how is anyone in the capital going to perceive the much strained for and expensive “balance”?

    • Greenlander

      Unless they were exceedingly fit most young officers couldn’t chase down and apprehend an 18 year old lad. The secret is local knowledge. On many occasions I’ve been able to shout out their name and tell them I’ll be at their house before they are, they stopped.
      Times have changed I used to be you would be called to come and look at the new kid on the block by other Constables so you knew him. Now it’s just a constant round of answering calls, many of which should never get past the telephone operators and onto the system, but everyone is afraid to say ‘no,’ and just pass the buck to the poor fool in the patrol car.

      • Paul Williams

        The WPC I saw could not have passed a proper fitness test, impossible. So what is the recruitment process now? Are there any standards at all – or are standards themselves now classed as discriminatory?

    • DearyMe

      When I came to leave the RAF I applied to join the police force and the height requirement for a male back then (1982) was a minimum 5’8″. I only just scraped over being 5’8″ and a ‘fag-end’, or so the measuring PC told me. These days I guess the ‘fag-end’ will do just fine.

    • Coniston

      A recent post by TheWeeFlea sums up why we are in this predicament (scroll down to Meaninglessly Shallow):-
      https://theweeflea.com/2017/08/03/douglas-murray-the-strange-death-of-europe-part-one-meaningless-shallowness/

      I understand that some years ago the height requirement for (male) police officers was reduced so that certain ethnic groups would not be discriminated against, as they were shorter than the average European. I also remember, in a remote location (in England) a policeman (English) who was so short that the top of his helmet was only up to my shoulder – and I am only slightly above average height.

  • Frunabulax

    I often think that claiming the police were/are afraid of being called ‘racist’ hands them a convenient excuse for not doing their duty. This is frequently used to explain their inaction over the thousands of child rapes from muslin grooming gangs over the last 30 years. I would aver it had nothing to do with ‘fear of being called racist’ but had everything to do with not giving a damn about the victims. Nowadays the police are indeed obsessed with grandstanding their multiculti credentials; to provide the police with excuses for why they failed to stop years of abuse does a disservice to the victims (I speak as someone whose northern girlfriend in the ’90s had first hand knowledge of these terrible events).
    It used to be that those on the left had disdain for the police, while those on the right supported them. For many years now i have seen how numerous colleagues on the right have equal disdain for the police. This is the consequence of the police’s snotty and aggressive attitude when dealing with white, British folk – the one group they can abuse with seeming impunity.

    • PJM

      Years ago I spoke to an old fashioned lefty who told me about his time living on a council estate in east London in the mid 70s which was going to hell. He was part of a resident group who tried to work with the police to make life there more bearable for the residents, particularly the elderly (and make life harder for the gangs). But the police had no interest. He said it was obvious to him back then that some sections of society were no longer being policed and were left to degenerate.

      • Greenlander

        I worked with councils, housing associations and other bodies to help reduce crime.
        Simple things like fences, and street lighting greatly assist but the main problem was the rush job of the pack em in, and good enough for em thinking behind of the designs of the estates. I know where I live now housing associations now pay much more regard to estate design than they did back when we were still trying to fill in bomb crates and build houses for people.

      • noobsy6

        Gypsies, Muslims, much of the black community. Prisons are filled with many more of these community member than their % within the population suggests should be there. Many are not even troubled as to do so would seem like “overkill” on a particular community over another…regardless of being deserved or not. People don’t want the truth or facts. They want soundbites and fantasy….political movements designed to fight for their “justice”. These are the issues.

  • Tom Collins

    The police are controlled by the CP Brigade. Those who don’t like it just leave.

    • DEvans

      And they are…in droves, male and female alike.

  • Guardian’s Quitter

    The blight, as with many negative things in modern British society, was instigated by Bliar. Replacing good Chief Constables with politically reliable ones, this combined with the fact that
    most medium ranking police officers (aged early thirties) and below are the product of the bliar educational system. Under this system children are taught that free speech was fine as long as it followed the narrow Common Purpose agenda, and that anything else was racist, homophobic, islamaphobic, xenophobic, etc, etc. This system also introduced the concept that state monitoring of every aspect of a citizens life was perfectly acceptable, indeed desirable, and that only those with something to hide would object. So, whereas police officers of yesteryear would find the police monitoring of the internet for ‘Hate Speech’ (whatever that is?), with it’s implicit threat of censure, abhorrent (unless it was caused by ‘information received’ regarding a genuine crime), today’s officers see nothing wrong with it. Welcome to our Brave New World.

    • Groan

      More prosaically I suspect monitoring if the equivalent of “pub talk” would have been eschewed in favour of dealing with crime.

    • Little Black Censored

      Blair, shall we ever come to an end of understanding what a disaster that man has been for the country?

  • grumpyashell

    Is this news,it has been getting worse year on year,where have the media been. You can say that the Police and many other institutions have succumbed to the PC agenda,BUT,the media have joined in by not pointing out the folly of the agenda . By keeping quiet the media has allowed that agenda to grow,journalists used to investigate stories,now they just download the latest story and regurgitate it.
    In many ways it is a form of appeasement,it is shameful.
    All these at the top seem to still be following the Blairite agenda and politicians are complicate with their silence and non action in not cleaning out the PC swamp.

  • Frank

    Excellent article, which will no doubt be completely ignored by the wonderful MPs who reign over us!
    Eventually all this political repression and distortion will back-fire and redress will occur. I am sure that old Sigmund Freud could confirm (were he still alive) that the more reality is repressed, the worse the backlash (against the establishment)!

    • noobsy6

      Why should they care? If they are attacked or threatened they have protection who can kill the perps,

  • Guardian’s Quitter

    Excellent, thank you Kathy.

  • David

    I will be called sexist but I do wonder whether the large number of female chief constables has anything to do with this?

    • Frank

      I am not sure that being female / male stops anybody from being a moron!

    • Talwin

      Don’t worry David, they all got to where they are because of their outstanding ability, surpassing all other applicants, and demonstrably objective selection procedures.

    • lizmilton

      Have a look at the

      Frankfurt school if subversion 11 point plan

      White heterosexual males are persona non grata in the West…

    • MorganCourtenay

      Or could it be perhaps HOW they were recruited? Height and weight limits have been scrapped, meaning that one can no longer assess a potential officer based on how imposing they might appear to a criminal. The police care more about quotas than competent recruits. That, and not female police officers per se, could be the problem.

  • Cynical Ex Academic

    I don’t see anything wrong with the police being appropriately courteous to members of the public stopped when going about their ordinary business, and in my experience, they usually are. Take, for example, being stopped for having a rear light out on a car, as against being chased down the street after having mown down a group of pedestrians. In the former case one should expect to be treated at least civilly, in the latter, to be in receipt of a violent handling.

    • Greenlander

      The last case, before retiring, of someone hitting a pedestrian was a man who had a stroke at the wheel.
      I see on TV how police handle suspects and it may be bravado for the cameras but it is tantamount to brutality. We were supplied with rigid handcuffs and all but the most drugged up never struggled when I had the cuffs on them, there is little flesh on the wrists and it hurts as you twist them, as instructed during training.

  • StaffsBrief

    A few years ago I was at a Crown Court in the West Midlands when a defendant “kicked off” (as my clients say) in the dock. The lone unarmed prisoner escort officer struggled to deal with this man who was raining punches and kicks on him. An usher went to find help and returned with a small female police officer. Although she was wearing a stab proof vest and was armed with an expanding baton and a pepper spray, she declined to intervene in the on-going struggle because she needed some “back up”. Eventually another prisoner escort officer responded to the alarm and the two of them managed to drag the defendant out of the dock towards the cells amid sounds of a continuing struggle. It hardly filled one with confidence in the police.

    • Greenlander

      You can’t use spray in a confined space especially when the prison escort might get a face full of it too, and a baton is not much use unless you can wield it to best effect, and is the court room the best arena to show off your skills? She was correct in her assessment.

      • She was correct in her assessment. But of course if she was of taller height within the old height/fitness restriction she would have been better able to physically deal with the situation.

        I’m all for WPCs but they must measure up to the same standards as men.

        • Little Black Censored

          What are the standards for men? Is there a minimum height?

          • Used to be. That is what we need back.

          • noobsy6

            Why height? I am only 5’8 yet could deadlift 300kg at my peak and pull a van. Just have rigorous physical testing that is the same for ALL sexes, races etc!

          • Height is a physical advantage in restraint. Not matter how many vans they can pull, someone of taller height and good physical fitness can restrain someone because of the leverage gain.

          • noobsy6

            Nonsense.

        • Damaris Tighe

          Indeed, her reliance on spray was probably compensation for her small build.

          • Hence why the police now have to be armed with a utility belt to make Batman jealous. Tazers are now the “easy” way to deal with the public now. Taze first, ask questions later.

      • True on the pepper spray, but you can damned well use an Asp. She’s wrong, that what she signed up for. If you can’t do the job, quit.

      • noobsy6

        Not if wayward pepper spray was less damaging than being attacked.

  • stuartMilan

    our civil society is being wound down

    • lizmilton

      Exactly…the end of western democracy is the aim…see the key objectives of Agenda 21 on

      Ukcolumndotorganisation

      And while you are there, have a look at their articles on Global Citizens and the Parliament of Mayors to see how far along the path we are to becoming a Marxist state under EU domination…

      Oddly enough, one of the key aims of the EU is to get rid of national Parliaments…any chance, do you think our MP’s will not ever return to the Commons after refurbishment?

      After all, what is there for them to do? They have handed control to Brussels of 43 areas we would normally expect the government to control…see
      “UK Parliament comes to an effective end.”

      Interesting, isn’t it, that the sovereignty of Parliament suddenly became important to certain people , once the Referendum result was known….

  • rbw152

    The law is the law and that’s the end of it.

    FGM is illegal in this country. Period. There is no room or need for any interpretation whatsoever.

    Arranged marriages? Illegal. Period.

    Sharia law can go hang. The only law the police should worry about is the law of the land, here in Britain.

    There is no need to tie oneself in knots trying to adjust one’s approach to our laws because of immigration or anything else. Police only need enforce the law in the same way as they always have.

    If that means certain people would tend to figure more highly in the statistics for certain offences then perhaps we need to address why these people are doing what they are doing and deal with that.

    More and more this country seems to be saying ‘come on in, do what you like and if it’s your culture to do so, that’s just fine’.

    No. It is not fine.

    • martianonlooker

      ‘come on in, do what you like and if it’s your culture to do so, that’s just fine’.
      The Somalis hereabouts seem to be rather enthusiastic about stabbing. Presumably part of their culture. The local rag runs the odd article wondering what is behind the upsurge in such violence. Maybe journalists go to the same school as CP PCs.

    • MorganCourtenay

      Sounds awfully simple, doesn’t it?

      “If that means certain people would tend to figure more highly in the statistics for certain offences then perhaps we need to address why these people are doing what they are doing and deal with that.”

      RIGHT. It is unfair and dishonest to say, for example, that the police must be racist if they arrest a high number of Afro-Caribbean men, but ignore the likelihood of men from this demographic committing crimes like stabbings and drug offences. Given the number of black British people, including children (like Damilola Taylor) who have been injured or killed due to violent crime, I think the police should be thanked for taking the perpetrators, WHATEVER THEIR COLOUR, off our streets.

    • noobsy6

      Indeed….and in lala land Iggle Piggle made it law that this would all come to pass. It’s easier to hand wring, virtu signal and justify the perps now that deal with them. Welcome to the West 2017!

  • DEvans

    An excellent article, thank you. It would be useful to explore how all three Armed Services have received a similar if not quite so pronounced ‘neutering’. What the Armed services have received that the Police have not on an industrial scale is the destruction of morale of all ranks by certain elements of the ‘legal profession’. This has been achieved through the pillorying of veterans over events from fifty years ago whilst simultaneously ‘investigating’ spurious allegations by dishonest people in various places in the Middle East. Shiner was caught… he was but one tip of a very large iceberg which has not gone away. The MOD has been complicit in all this. It is interesting to note that there is only one department within the MOD which grew in the Blair/Brown/Cameron years. That was the Legal Department which went from one to two star grade. It provided, for the first time ever, a Two star position for a woman in the British Army.

    • Frunabulax

      The MOD pumps out a relentless deluge of LGBTQWERTY/feminist/unconscious bias/race champion this/ethnic that blah blah bilge on an almost daily basis. When Frederick Forsyth (commenting after Sgt Blackman’s release) stated that there is a seam of MOD civil servants that loathe servicemen and women he was bang on the money. James Dellingpole on Breitbart London also has a very accurate and informed take on the MOD.

      • DEvans

        Indeed in my 30 years service I recognised that many of the civil servants in the MOD saw those in uniform as an unfortunate chore which had to be dealt with. This was particularly so the more senior they became. If the MOD were as good at procuring the right equipment, effective weaponry and recruiting good men and women as it is in projecting it’s PC image the citizens of this country could sleep easy in their beds. It isn’t.

    • DEvans wrote:

      Shiner was caught… he was but one tip of a very large iceberg … ‘

      More Goldberg than iceberg.

  • geordieboy

    Too many laws and not enough coppers but plenty of lefty liberal solicitors and judges to tie the police hands behind their back.

    • MorganCourtenay

      But do you remember after every terrorist or other attack, those same lefties praise the police for putting their lives in danger on behalf of the public?

  • Flaketime

    The Police have managed to turn themselves into a Political Correctness Enforcement Squad, more interested in arresting people for thought crime instead of violent crime. Only this week we saw an idiotic Sergeant threatening a Supermarket chain for displaying a sign for ‘feminine hygiene’ products signalling his virtue by declaring they could be used by ‘all’ genders.

    For me, the cuts have gone no where near deep enough, and we don’t need any thought police or squad to enforce a corrupt government set of oppressive laws which were never in a manifesto and never put to the people.

    More worrying today is the pronouncement by Theresa disMay declaring that it was OK for the Left wing protesters in Charlottesville to attack the white supremacists because she didn’t agree with their political beliefs. If this is genuinely her belief then we should all be very worried.

    • Flaketime wrote:

      ‘ … signalling his virtue by declaring they could be used by ‘all’ genders.

      I can confirm that he is correct: sanitary towels are reassuringly useful if you have a bleeding haemorrhoid, are late for a wedding and have run out of the appropriate cream and its applicator.

  • therealguyfaux ✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ

    I can hear it now: “Cheer up, we COULD be like America, where the rozzers are armed and worse things happen as a result!” And yet, there have always been incidents where, had there been an available shotgun in the boot of the jam sandwich responding, shorter work might have been made of the situation. “Clunk-click” isn’t only the onomatopoeia of seat belts being fastened.

  • 60022Mallard

    Can anyone remind me how far the idea of policemen being required to have studied for a degree in policing at their own expense before being allowed in has got?

    Anyone believe nursing is better for having to have a degree in it?

    • Labour_is_bunk

      Or teaching?

  • paul parmenter

    Seasoned officers are leaving the force in droves? I shall pause and count to ten. Within that time frame, I fully expect some government spokesperson to pipe up with the information that they are recruiting record numbers of new officers, they are spending more than ever before on keeping us all safe, and their policies are working because crime is on the decrease.

  • Malcolm

    Thank you! At long last someone has had the courage to say what many sensible people have been thinking for ages. The police have been treated as an easy target for scape-goating over the ills in society by politicians for at least two decades in order to make those same politicians, who should really be carrying the can, look tough. They are after all a very easy target when they are banned by law from taking any form of industrial action however badly they are treated. Straw started it with the wholly unnecessary and totally biased Lawrence Enquiry; a visitor from Mars would be forgiven for concluding that it was the police not racist thugs who had committed the murder. The outcome was pre-ordained, and in the absence of evidence being found of police wrong-doing then no matter; a whole new crime of previously unknown “institutional racism” could be invented to tar them. The result was predictable and has come to pass – a disenchanted workforce that trusts no-one and has become risk averse and pliant to PC agendas advocated by their supine and politically driven chief officers. Who can blame them?

    Theresa May continued the trend as Home Secretary, blatantly abusing the police both verbally and through draconian changes to their working conditions, rewards, promotion and pension entitlements under Tom Winsor. Let’s have elected (ie political) local “Crime Commissioners” with the power to fire chief constables; let’s have senior officers with no policing experience recruited from industry and parachuted into superintendent roles; let’s make sure that the public are told it’s because the police can’t be trusted. She did all that quite cynically to further her own political career and burnish her claim to be the next Iron Lady, taking on “vested interests”. It was notable that she didn’t try on with the Fire Brigade, a workforce with a history of militant union activity. Those officers not nearing retirement took the other best option and left. They were replaced by young recruits schooled from the start in the bizarre requirements of pandering to the latest multi-cultural or politically correct fad; law enforcement was secondary to the need to avoid causing offence. With the IPPC, an organisation that seems to start from a position of assuming police guilt in any complaint or incident, looking over their shoulder, operational officers would be brave indeed (or very foolish) to ignore the stifling restrictions of political correctness in order to do what their predecessors did without thinking: enforce the law without fear or favour.

    The result of all that is a police force which was once renowned the world over for its benign but efficient law enforcement, largely unarmed and operating with overwhelming public support, has been reduced to painting its patrol cars in rainbow colours to advertise its inclusivity but has seen that public support drain away to its lowest levels since its difficult birth in the early 19th century and the days of mob rule on our streets. The blame for that should be firmly placed where it belongs; on our myopic political classes. Well said, Kathy. As the old saying goes: pity the poor copper.

  • Reference your question, “What self respecting copper wouldn’t opt out for the simpler life as a private security guard or bouncer?” The answer is very few. And those few, the proud, the brave, have learned, i’m sure, in the phrase made famous by the blue shirted Chicago police (their supervisors wear white shirts) are going fetal – because they cannot possibly win.

    • D. A. Christianson wrote:

      ‘ … fetal … ‘

      Fetal?

      • ‘Fetal’ is the phrase.

        • D. A. Christianson wrote:

          “Fetal’ is the phrase.

          I’m showing my age, however I’m sure, when I was at school, more than forty five years ago, that a phrase was the operative word or group of words in a clause or sentence giving meaning or emphasis to it. Lacking familiarity with a word I think should be spelt foetal, and in the absence of any explanation of its meaning, it seems to me that ‘fetal’ serves no function at all.

          • Maybe you missed the memo. I’m an American and back in the early 19th century we simplified the spelling of many words, Actually we went back in many cases to the way they had been spelled in Jacobean times. Not my fault that you had a substandard education.

          • Damaris Tighe

            Indeed, and even if you were British your meaning was clear 🙂

          • D. A. Christianson wrote:

            Maybe you missed the memo.

            I may have done, had there actually been one. Try again.

            I’m an American … ‘

            There’s no need to tell us; it’s painfully obvious.

            ‘ … and back in the early 19th century we simplified the spelling of many words, … ‘

            Many of your variant spelling are the product of Nathaniel Webster’s attempts to create ‘American’ English, some are simply due to ignorance of the language. It’s a common fallacy amongst Americans that you speak an older and purer form of English than us.

            ‘ … Actually we went back in many cases to the way they had been spelled in Jacobean times.

            Jacobean times? That’ll be from 1607 onwards then. Foetus has been spelt thus since at least the sixteenth century, that’s Tudor times, and perhaps long before that.

            Not my fault that you had a substandard education.

            No indeed. However, I would point out that whether or not my education was substandard, it seems to have been to a higher standard than yours.

            By the way, using an initial capital after a comma is considered to be a sign of an inadequate education.

          • Damaris Tighe

            Is that your best contribution to his comment? Btw, you’ve misspelled ‘bigoted’ in your name.

          • Damaris Tighe sniped:

            Is that your best contribution to his comment?

            In what way do you mean ‘best’? Can you do better?

            you’ve misspelled ‘bigoted’ in your name.

            I ought to know how to spell my own name and I’m sure I know better than you.

        • Partridge

          ‘Feral’ is the word. F-e-r-a-l.

          • Sadly no, it is not. A feral police force would offer some semblance of protection for some, determined in some way, however unfair. Fetal is different, it essentially means that they will do the minimum that they are required to, all the time realizing if anything goes wrong, they will be scapegoated, which is what is happening in our cities, and why it is going to get even worse.. The rank and file police know it, but there is no solution, when one is punished for doing one’s job.

  • Royinsouthwest

    A few years ago some journalist, I forget who, described the police as “the paramilitary wing of the Guardian.” At the time I thought it was a good joke. It is no longer a joke and it is now no laughing matter.

  • Mike

    Three issues which are ignored:-
    1. There appears to be a decline of ex NCOs from elite military units joining the Police. These men have the toughness, confidence and experience when to go in hard or when to diffuse a situation with a joke. Sergeant Major Pat Riley SAS DCM joined the Sussex Police: I cannot imagine many criminals chancing their luck with someone like him.
    2. Those physically tough graduates who might th join the Police often enter the armed forces, SIS, MI5 and international engineering companies. How much of the spread of cultural Marxism via political correctness has occurred because Police officers lack the academic ability to refute it? Many of the Trotskyists start their political life at universities and having met them there would afford one an insight into their character and mentality. The mentality of these Trotsyists is beyond comprehension for most sensible people: one has to see and hear them to believe.
    3. There are few politicians with experience of the armed forces or are ex-Police who understand the problems. Politicians who had served in Aden, Oman, Cyprus, Borneo, Malaya, N Ireland , Palestine either in police or army roles are very few. Don Concannon, a Labour MP served with the Guards in Palestine. This sort of practical, patriotic, down to earth and tough politician is largely extinct in the Labour Party.

    • Flaketime

      Paddy Pantsdown served in the military, and with him as an example I don’t think you make a very good case !

      • Mike

        There always exceptions to the rule. An ex City of London detective told me that until the 1960s, plenty of ex Guards sergeants joined the Police and had the unflappable qualities and sound judgement in dealing with people which were invaluable. I could also add Sergeant Jack Terry DCM, Royal Artillery, 11 Commando and SAS who joined the Nottingham Police and Sergeant Ernie Bond OBE, Scots Guards and SAS who became an Assistant Commissioner of the Met. Noel Fry MC, RAC , Parachute Regiment, served in WW2 and Palestine and then joined the Police- Special Branch.
        http://www.telegraph.co.uk/obituaries/2016/11/30/richard-fry-won-mc-normandy-obituary/
        Sir Robert Mark Commissioner was an officer in the RAC and Phantoms in WW2.

        A member of the Liberal Party said he considered that many of the ex Colonial Police who continued to join the UK forces until the end of the 1960s added considerably to the quality, probably due to their language and cultural skills.

        I have come to wonder whether many of the excellent qualities of our Police were in part because of earlier careers in the armed forces and working overseas. Also, local politicians and MPs had similar experience upon which they draw .

        • Mike wrote:

          An ex City of London detective told me … ‘

          I dimly remember coppers like that. A man who’d organised a frightened young officer and a platoon of frightened young men in a decisive and bloody action was unlikely to lose control of himself and the situation in a little local fracas. Men like that knew how to handle headstrong youths without clogging up the courts and giving them criminal records.

      • Flaketime wrote:

        Paddy Pantsdown served in the military … ‘

        The military what? (Military is an adjective not a noun.)

        That notwithstanding, Lord Ashdown (I disapprove of honours as much as you seem to but there’s no need to be rude) served in the Special Boat Squadron of the Royal Marines, which is just about as elite as elite forces can go. I doubt he’s unaware of and unsympathetic to the political and practical problems and risks faced by ‘the bobby on the beat’.

    • Mike wrote:

      Sergeant Major Pat Riley SAS DCM joined the Sussex Police: I cannot imagine many criminals chancing their luck with someone like him.

      Can’t you? I can, however, I cannot imagine any of them getting the better of him.

  • Vasubandhu

    What a disgraceful society we have become. We can also see, from May’s disgusting comments about Charlottesville today, that she is not only a feminist but also a clueless moron. We simply cannot go on like this.

    • noobsy6

      Stop voting for them then.

  • The usual rambling, ranting and incoherent rubbish from Kathy Gyngell, this time redeemed only by her reference to Macpherson who can be credited with doing so much to destroy the cohesion in our national life. Why did he say it? Was it his intention to destabilise the country to the degree that minority communities now feel able to say that they feel it necessary to set up their own, wholly illegal, police forces (like, for example, the Shomrim) or was he really motivated by nothing than a genuine desire to make our world a better place?

    Not knowing the man I cannot say whether he succeeded or failed. However, I can say that he can be fairly blamed for much of the mess we find ourselves in with regard to policing.

  • MorganCourtenay

    Having grown up on crime fiction, and admiring how the police uncover serious crimes that would make the average person cringe or shudder, I have always respected the police. In my family, we were raised on a cultural diet of respecting law and authority. Even when police officers do wrong– and there are certainly bad apples– my father made it clear that the wrongdoers should not be used to tarnish those who enforced the law without prejudice.

    Two of my brothers became quite delinquent in their teens and got arrested a couple of times for shoplifting. Did my parents think this was racist? Absolutely not. I think my brothers were more scared of the tongue-lashing they would get from their Nigerian parents than the courteous British coppers who carefully explained their rights to them and stopped by our house to have a chat and discuss the legal system as though this were a Question-And-Answer session, rather than an arrest. I remember being incredibly surprised with the officers who spoke to my brothers, telling them that they would not face charges and should turn their lives around, because they were better than this. I had expected (and wanted) more severity.

    As for me, I’ve never had a negative experience with a police officer, and I appreciate the police being available when I needed them. The consequences of handcuffing and gagging the police are serious: it can cost lives. When that happens, the Left will turn around and blame the Conservatives for cutting police numbers, suddenly now the champions of efficient policing, when it was their indiscriminate attacks on British police that led to this breakdown in objective moral authority. After terrorist attacks, all claims of institutional racism fly out of the window, as they Tweet about how brave the police are, and how they defend the innocent. Meanwhile, the police have fewer tools to do so. I’ve lived in neighbourhoods where drunken yobs ruled the streets. If you wanted to call the police, it was a long wait until they arrived. The days of bobbies on the beat and the village policeman that I read about in quaint old English books as a child are gone. And the irony? Those who claim to be most victimized by the police are actually the biggest victims when the police, out of fears of being accused of bigotry, retract and use less force. Poor and ethnic minority communities NEED a solid police presence against the drug-dealers, stabbers and other such criminals who claim the lives of hundreds each year.

    It turns out their pontificating Labour/Lefty MP won’t be there to save them in the event of violent crime.

  • DaveLeeDozy

    ”Muslim child abuse gangs in Rochdale, Oxford, Rotherham and Newcastle.”

    And 70 other towns and cities. At least.

  • John P Hughes

    The problems of the British police have been much as discussed by Kathy Gyngell and respondents below for some 20 years if not longer. Things seem to get worse, but the decay started under John Major’s Government if not earlier.
    A Royal Commission on the Police has been called for frequently in recent years. It is time that the present Cabinet finally decided to have the Queen appoint one. Theresa May would get a boost in public and Parliamentary support if she were to announce one at last, with the requirement to report in 2-2½ years.