woman boardroom

On Friday something harrowing happened on social media. It took me all weekend to get over these grotesque images. In protest at a dress code requiring women to wear high heels at PwC, feminists took pictures of their ‘Friday Flats’ and posted them on Twitter.

So out came the clogs, the Birkenstocks, and the sandals with socks. I doubt there was a pedicure in sight. No doubt the sandals are more comfortable to wear while fetching your kale salad. Still, it was scary.

Nicola Thorp was sent home from work for not wearing high heels. Now, she’s campaigning against being forced to wear make-up, too. I kid you not. These feminist frumpies sure do have time on their hands.

I am on the side of the employer when it comes to dress codes. Can we now wear flip-flops and cardigans to work? Please clarify?

As usual it generated one of those anodyne petitions that will require MPs to debate this nonsense in the House of Commons. And to think we once ran an empire.

Anyway, the real point here is that Nicola Thorp, the part-time actress, full-time social justice warrior-cum-receptionist, is making the type of career choice that we know contributes to the ‘pay gap.’ But you won’t see any of the SJWs point this out to her on Twitter.

Secondly, and more importantly, said actress should be wearing heels to PwC.  She should also be complimenting that with a sexy yet demure dress, finished off with some fetching accessories. This should help her with her second most important activity after her acting career, namely husband hunting.

At twenty-seven time is a ticking, and there should be a few eligible bachelors knocking around PwC that might fit the bill. Goodness with a career in accountancy or even worse consultancy, these chaps could do with the large helping of glamour an aspiring actress would bring.  A perfect match I think.

It is true that sadly these days, due to assortative mating, said accountants and consultants are more likely to marry their fellow accountants and consultants, which is bad for both dinner parties and indeed social mobility and ‘equality.’

In fact, when I set up my own Conservative Soul-Mate dating site such matches shall be banned. Looking to literature, we can see some of our most dashing heroes had the decency to spread the wealth as well as the love: Mr Darcy, Mr Bingley and of course Mr Rochester all married not Lady someone-or-other but a woman lower down the income scale and indeed social scale. But what they lacked in status they made up for in substance. These men valued character over career, which is why we love them.

Anyway my point is, I think, that the employer should be able to have a dress code of whatever they want. And if you are an aspiring actress working in an environment full of well-paid men, there are worse things you could do than put on a pair of high heels and some blush. Trust me, I am right on most things, and I am right on this.

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