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Today’s list starts with Jesus. Sunday was the feast day of Christ the King, and Kevin Williamson at the National Review explains its importance in countering the fascist, socialist or communist god-State.

Williamson states: ‘But the spirit behind the institution of Christ the King was and is entirely consonant with the American idea. To the encroaching and arrogant spirit of communism and fascism the Vicar of Christ said, “No. You are not the beginning and the end. You are not the dispositive power in this universe. You are not the final judge. There is something above you and beyond you and infinitely greater than you. You, with all your bombs and bayonets and prisons, may command all the known world to kneel at your feet, but we have seen pharaohs before, and emperors and god-kings, too, and we have in the end stood over their graves, and thought on the grave that is empty”.’
He concludes in this powerful piece: ‘The message of Christ the King is that while we may owe the legitimate secular powers some obedience, they cannot claim us as property to be disposed of in accordance with their own whims, because there is Another who has a prior and superseding claim on us.’

The second piece again is on the sexual counter-revolution. It calls for a re-think of the current no-boundaries sexual free-for-all that has landed us in this mess.

Christine Emba in the Washington Post believes that ‘now could be the time to reintroduce virtues such as prudence, temperance, respect and even love. We might pursue the theory that sex possibly has a deeper significance than just recreation and that “consent” – that thin and gameable boundary – might not be the only moral sensibility we need respect.’

Only time will tell whether common sense prevails once all the predators and harassers have been held to account.



Finally, a piece from 2009 in City Journal, explaining once again the incredible drop in the crime rate of New York City.

This is an important piece because it tells us that nothing is inevitable. Safe cities do not appear by accident: someone must decide to make safety a priority and find a system that ensures it happens. This system to reinvent a city racked with crime was known as ‘broken windows’, not to be confused with zero tolerance, or stop and frisk (or stop and search this side of the pond).

It sets out once again how significant anti-social and disorder crimes are because ‘a government’s inability to control even a minor crime like graffiti signaled to citizens that it certainly couldn’t handle more serious ones. Disorder, therefore, was creating a crisis that threatened all segments of urban life.’ These ‘minor’ crimes should not be ignored.

As violent crime creeps up in Britain, this is an informative read.