Laura Perrins: Who’s to blame for the rape culture, sisters? You are

In the wake of the Harvey Weinstein scandal, there may come a time when there are hardly any actors left in Hollywood who have not been accused of sexual assault or worse. Many have already admitted molesting women – some have denied it.

But there is no doubt that for decades the ultra-Left gods of Hollywood, part-creators of the culture we now find ourselves in, have systematically abused women. I pointed out a while back that the Left created this rape culture the feminists believe we live in.

In truth, while the brilliant book and series The Handmaid’s Tale depicted the abuse of women in a fictional fundamentalist Christian tyranny, the real abuse of women was occurring right under the noses of the Left-wing, right-on feminists of Hollywood. While Meryl Streep spent her entire Golden Globes acceptance speech slamming Trump, she never once called out Harvey Weinstein for the monster that he is.

In truth, if our culture has pockets of misogyny, much of it is produced by the current ‘popular’ culture. This was admitted by Guardianista Arwa Mahdawi, who accepted she was a bit of a sexist.

In this mea culpa, Mahdawi admitted that ‘On Tuesday, I heard about the rape allegations against the actor Ed Westwick, best known for his role as the womaniser Chuck Bass on Gossip Girl . . . Oh dear, I thought, when I first heard about the allegations. That’s ruined Gossip Girl for me. Which was a bizarre thing to think, really, considering that Gossip Girl should have been ruined for me a long time ago.’



Mahdawi continued, ‘Not just because of my age, but because the show is a shining example of rape culture; of how the degradation of women is normalised and women like me – proud feminists – can find ourselves taking a deeply sick status quo for granted. Can find ourselves putting up with things we shouldn’t put up with. Can find ourselves feeling sorry for our harassers.’

She finishes: ‘The recent allegations against Westwick are an important reminder that it’s not just a few bad men who are to blame for the problem of sexual harassment and abuse. It’s our entire culture.’

When I read this piece, I asked myself why would a feminist watch a show, ‘largely watched by teenage girls who has a character that is not only presented as being sexual abusive. But, importantly, he’s not presented as a nasty, criminal sort of sexual abuser. Just a bad boy who is thrillingly dangerous to know.’ If this is what my sisters are watching, then they are not just accepting a culture that degrades women, they are creating it.

Arwa Mahdawi admits that because of this she has some ‘internalised misogyny and sexism’. Well, I thought, perhaps the reason I don’t hate my own sex is because I largely, and to the best extent as I can, reject the ‘popular culture’ and try to shield my daughters from it. Yet no doubt I would be labelled a ‘fundamentalist’.

I can never understand why feminists watch something like Game of Thrones which, I am told, involves the rape of women, the killing of pregnant women and more. People watch this night after night and then wonder why the culture is so degraded.

Then we have all the detective series that depict the rape, murder and butchery of the female body. Oh, but it is warning of what male aggression can do to women. Ok, fine, perhaps it is true. But perhaps there comes a point when we have had enough shows about the rape, murder and butchery of the female body and perhaps there are a few oddballs out there who quite enjoy watching it.

These feminists are the same people who believe we must have abortion on demand to liberate women and have female equality. Really? I have thought long and hard about this and really, if the terms of equality on offer are that women must sacrifice their own pre-born children, then I say – screw you. I’m not signing up for that deal so toddle back to your drawing board and give me a better offer.

There are many boyfriends out there who use abortion as a way to get out of their responsibility to their girlfriends, and put plenty of pressure on them to abort an otherwise wanted child. And then there is the out-and-out use of abortion to facilitate the rape of minor girls, the very definition of rape culture.

So, feminist sisters, if this Weinstein scandal leads to a little more self-awareness then that’s a good thing. And when you denounce the rape culture, and the misogyny, and the harassment, ask yourself just who is promoting it? And when it comes to asking who is accepting it – look in the mirror.

Laura Perrins

  • ancientpopeye

    Spot on.

  • Reborn

    In the vacuous world of the performing arts & utterly talentless world of
    celebrity culture, young women & men have been more than happy to proffer
    sex for a step or two up the ladder of fame & fortune.
    There are some loathsome gropers in Parliament, including Labour & Lib Dem peers,
    going back to Lloyd George & beyond. Politically this behaviour is intolerable & should
    be dealt with harshly if allegations can be proved.
    Because politics is important to us all.
    In the entertainment world things are different & any young person who is subject to rape or attempted rape should involve the police.
    Short of that, a slap round the face or a “no thank you” should suffice.
    Charges made decades after the alleged event smack of attention grabbing for
    starlets needing some free publicity.

    • Colkitto03

      ‘Think Heath & the “Common Market”.
      Yes, his exceedingly high level of enthusiasm was hard to understand in normal terms.

  • 39 Pontiac Dream

    Neo-feminists will find something to complain about in all walks of life and/or anything on screen whether it be Gossip Girl or Paddington Bear.
    I do take issue, Laura, with part of this article:

    ‘While Meryl Streep spent her entire Golden Globes acceptance speech slamming Trump, she never once called out Harvey Weinstein for the monster that he is.’

    At present, we have no idea what Weinstein did. He admitted to consensual sex with some of his accusers and groping (bad enough) but the charges of rape have not been proven. Please don’t join the bandwagon of social media judges and wait until sentencing has been passed. Until he has been proven a monster, he stands, at the moment, accused of being one.

    • Bosanova

      Except that the publicly known facts about Trump were considerably less incriminating than the well known “facts” about Weinstein within Holywood (even if actively suppressed). Now don’t get me started on Bill Clinton (Weinstein payed his Lewinsky legal fees didn’t you know?)
      The point being that Streep is a colossal hypocrite.
      If you need to understand better read this article about how the feminist supporters of Clinton gave carte blanche for abusive men to hide in plain sight on the proviso that they loudly and vocaly espouse progressive views:
      https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2017/11/reckoning-with-bill-clintons-sex-crimes/545729/

  • Rachel Bevan

    How on earth does watching a TV show equate to the hypocrisy you are implying? Well done on trying to blame the left and your fellow women for this current situation but the fact is, change is frustratingly slow, and for many we are still living in the dark ages of the sexism and misogyny that was more publicly acceptable a few decades ago. Those people tend to be on the right of the political spectrum!

    • Reborn

      I suspect that you do not mean by “the right” what those of us with a sense of history mean by it.
      Make no mistake, those Oldham rapists & their confreres belonged to the far right, and have been, possibly unconsciously, assisted by the allegedly far left Labour Party.
      Time we grew out of this simple left/right dichotomy.

  • Jolly Radical

    When at University, I remember the moment when my girlfriend informed me that “every man is a potential rapist.” This was a slogan she had learned from her feminist friends.

    I replied that all women were also potential rapists, and both men and women alike are all potential murderers, arsonists and shoplifters.

    I’m starting to wonder if this was the right response.

    • PierrePendre

      My wife said the same thing to me. I asked her if she thought I was a potential rapist? Or her father. Or her cousins. Or the men friends she so liked to be with. If it were true, our world would be a nightmare of Hobbesian violence. The subject wasn’t discussed again. It seems to me to be the sort of thing that first years say to each other at university but that anyone who doesn’t have feminist dogma cemented between their ears should grow out.

      • Jolly Radical

        I suspect you married my girlfriend.

        • PierrePendre

          Or they went to the same university.

    • Hugo1

      It was.

    • boomslang74

      Weren’t you tempted to reply “And you’re potentially my ex-girlfriend”?

  • PierrePendre

    It’s bizarre to insist on one hand that schoolchildren should be protected from the sexualisation of public life and have it forced down their throats by educators on the other. We know that young children are naturally aware of the existence of their sexuality and we also deplore paedophilia. We tolerate what children do and say together in their own world because it’s harmless. We punish the paedophile because he’s an adult intruder and abuser in that world. At the same time, we encourage the intrusion into education of transgressive proselytisers like Stonewall and crossdressers who have sanctified themselves via transgenderism. The Mail on Sunday published a story about the London Early Years Foundation which runs nurseries recruiting men dressed as women to read stories to two-year-olds. The idea is to inculcate at an early age the “normality” of public crossdressing. A photograph at Breitbart showed a fat, grotesquely made-up and wigged man reading to a little girl. A smiling teacher looks on approvingly. This man did didn’t look like a woman. He looked like a sad caricature of a woman, in fact like a freak. I suppose the child could regard him as some sort of circus clown but he was in no way normal and she was certainly having her innocence abused. I have no objection to a man dressing up in this way in the appropriate place – say a queer pub – and I accept it must take bravery to expose oneself thus in public. But for him and his ilk to inflict themselves on children with official support as an ideological finger to the rest of us is a travesty. And it’s part of the child abuse that in our confusion is simultaneously decried and promoted.

  • Groan

    Laura I’m a huge fan . But can I ask you to think hard about the support you lend to your opponents by taking on as a “fact” that there is a “Rape Culture” . I would point out that there are an awful lot of allegations about but in fact few cases. I agree that there is a growth of the sexually liberated celebrity culture which we have known from Shakespeare’s day at least and this now fills our entertainment. However even with the shift in the law to catch more men in the 2002 Act which introduced the idea that consent was the key issue (rather than assault or force), a ballooning population and extensive campaigning the actual reported and survey data indicates that sexual offending by males is proportionately continuing its long term decline (note I mean sexual offending rather than knee touching). The recent increase in cases reflecting the post Saville “historic” cases and of course the belated catch up on the widespread abusive rings tolerated for at least a decade due to fears of “racism”.
    Like many of my sex I don’t entertain a rosy view of males however the evidence is that there isn’t some mass growth in men raping or assaulting women. What feminism may have contributed to is an increase in heavy drinking, multiple partners, fighting and sexual assaults from women. But the truth is that for both sexes the sexually liberated remain a minority. It deeply disappoints when TCW buys into the feminist rhetoric. And it is tactically a bad move for if you really do believe males are so uniformly dangerous how can you object to the feminist hard line?

    • Laura Perrins

      Groan, so it is really Hollywood I am focusing on, as a lot of the offences have been admitted. I have already said that I don’t think there is an culture of harassment or worse at Westminster, or indeed campus. I think each has to be looked at separately. But I do think the culture it coarse, at the very least.

      • Groan

        I appreciate your comment.

    • Mojo

      I do agree with you. However, I have long abhorred programmes like Game of Thrones. It really does encourage the acceptance of abusive behaviour. I have had many a discussion on the content of much TV drama which always shows women being molested and abused. Always it seems with hardly any clothes on. I remember many years ago a discussion round the dinner table whereby one of my female guests said she hated nudity on the beach but felt she had to do what other women were doing otherwise she would stand out from the crowd. I said either don’t go to the beach or be strong enough to wear your swimsuit with pride as I am sure you will look the stunning vixen as swimwear creates shapely figures and nudity isn’t always very attractive. The women said they felt pushed into going agai st their instincts. The men said they enjoyed watching nude women. This then created such a huff and puff from the women.

      I really think a few people have created a culture that the majority abhor but are so frightened of being out of step that we are now accepting situations we know are wrong and unhealthy because we are too frightened to put our head above the parapet. I for one agree with Laura. My children (now fully grow ) had their television heavily monitored and we chose our cinema very carefully indeed.

      • Groan

        An interesting observation fro Psychology. Go back 30 years and young people’s response to the question how many sexual partners or encounters followed a pattern males would exaggerate these in interview (compared to anonymous reporting) and females the reverse. Now research reports that females exaggerate too (and there is some evidence of the reverse from young men). Overall there is certainly behaviour suggesting people feel they should have more sex and partners, or say they have, than is actually the case.

  • Flaketime

    Rape is a terribly difficult thing. In some cases it is easy when the male stalks his victim and assaults her, consent is clearly not given and she is violated by means of violence or the threat of it. If our government did not cover up offending by ethnic minorities we would be able to see some of the problem migration is causing.

    But other cases are far more difficult. Two people go to a house after a night out, both are drunk and their judgement is adversely affected. He thinks he has her consent, but it is not until the afternoon of the next day after she has left with a hangover and has then been to the Police claiming she has been raped. Who do you believe?

    According to the Feminazis the woman should always be believed – without evidence and the man imprisoned. There isn’t even any need for an expensive inconvenient trial, but on the other hand there is the old old maxim that it is better for 10 guilty men to walk free than for one innocent to be found guilty.

    It is very easy to make unsubstantiated claims of rape and in the Weinstein case I see women photographed with the man who they claim to be an aggressive sex monster, looking wholly relaxed standing there with him.

  • timbazo

    The reason why the actresses did not out Weinstein sooner is easy to understand if not justify. Remember most actors and actresses are not necessarily strong people. They are more likely to find inspiration in their insecurities and their need for acclaim from peers and public alike. In most cases, the desire for acclaim does not lessen with stardom; it is only intensified by the attention of the media and the ability to treat other people badly.

    Think of an actress who is now established as a Hollywood star. When she started out, she slept with a couple of guys to get her first big roles. Knowing what sleazebags they are from personal experience, she is pretty sure that they boasted of their ‘conquest’ to their friends. the word has spread and the actress will be sure that most people around her suspect that she did sleep with those men to get going in the industry. What will this insecure woman want to feel? She will want to feel that what she did was ‘normal’. The best way of persuading herself that this is indeed the case is to let the predators continue to prey on new actresses starting out and induct them into the business in the same way that she was inducted. Add to that the fact that the predators continue to control who gets the best parts in the best films and it is not difficult to see why the actresses decided to stay schtum.

  • 3aple

    “A high percentage of male subjects abused in childhood by a female relative became perpetrators. Having been a victim was a strong predictor of becoming a perpetrator, as was an index of parental loss in childhood.”
    Cycle of Child Sexual Abuse, Glasser et al, The British Journal of Psychiatry, 2001.

    .

  • Nephthys

    The underlying problem, I think, is unscientific approaches to the causes of violence against women and girls. While there’s a consensus that male aggression against women and girls intersects with gender expression, sexual socialisation and cultural norms, there’s no real attempt to identify which practices are the key factors. This allows us to talk about pop culture, religion, power dynamics and whatever else to no end. You’ll blame the content of the fiction and they’ll blame the internalised misogyny of viewers and producers.

    I’ve never liked the phrase “rape culture”. Firstly, it allows rapists and enablers to defect onto the nebulous “culture” in a way that erodes popular recognition of human agency (the left benefit from this). Rapists are violent criminals and criminals are autonomous moral agents. Secondly, the word was conceived as an argument for the sort of systemic cultural changes that have nothing to do with the elimination of violence against women and much to do with raising radical consciousness among women.

  • Jade Davis France

    The cause of “rape culture” is “rape hysteria” promoted by people like the author of this article.