‘You don’t have to be what your family tells you what you have to be!’ This verdict on family life is pronounced by a child as part of a classroom film that is successfully promoting the transformation of our society. The speaker is aged around seven. Surrounding him are a group of classmates. They are performing a literacy lesson ‘singalong’ in line with what now constitutes ‘best practice’ in our primary schools.

The makers of the film would like us all to celebrate their mission:


‘Educate & Celebrate is an Ofsted and DFE recognised Best Practice Award Programme that gives staff, students, parents and governors the confidence and strategies to implement an LGBT+Inclusive curriculum to successfully eradicate homophobia, biphobia and transphobia from our nursery, primary and secondary schools, colleges, universities, organisations and communities.’

Welcome to the revolution! All you need to understand is that Educate & Celebrate, a UK charity that is expert in ‘transforming schools and organisations into LGBT+ friendly places’, is here to help you and your child build a better world. Singalong literacy lessons, accompanied by group dance routines, rival what was on show from the North Korean cheerleaders at the recent Winter Olympics.

The school curriculum is being manipulated to serve the charity’s LGBT agenda. Making school subjects a vehicle for promoting any socio-political standpoint leads, inevitably, to distortion of those subjects. It is a well-trodden pathway in both Marxist and fascist states. Subject knowledge is selected on the basis of how well it serves the purpose of indoctrination.

Educate & Celebrate decided, for example, that February should be ‘LGBT+ History Month’. In the classroom this translates into choosing topics that match the theme, rather than because of any historical importance. Much the same barriers to knowledge already operate during Black History Month. And, of course, whether it be Black History or LGBT history, do not expect historical facts to get in the way of subject integrity.

For the purpose of LGBT-approved literacy lessons, nursery rhymes have already disappeared from many infant classrooms. Many fairy tales are going the same way unless they are rescued by an LGBT re-write. Hans Christian Andersen’s Ugly Duckling now appears as The Sissy Duckling in an Educate & Celebrate model lesson. For older children, the promotion of texts that promote LGBT issues places a similar constraint on access to the traditional canon of literature. It closes doors rather than opens them.

And do not suppose that the stranglehold of the LGBT zealots is confined to history and to literacy. Far from it, as its persuasive website makes clear! Educate & Celebrate is promoting lessons and resources covering a spectrum of subjects carrying the LGBT seal of approval: mathematics and ‘advice for writing inclusive maths questions’, geography, design and technology, computing, foreign languages, citizenship, music and dance, PE and so on and so on.

For the avoidance of any doubt regarding what is acceptable these days there is an additional collection of ‘Policy and Guidance’ material covering everything from ‘Exemplar Healthy Relationships Policy’ to ‘TRANS guidance’. All of this is backed up by a plethora of ‘Gallery and Media’ material. A ‘Supported by BBC Children in Need’ tag seals the deal for schools to embrace what is being offered.

Interested? ‘A whole day of Saturday CPD [continuing professional development] for just £30 delivered by us and our Best Practice Award schools. Experienced teachers training teachers! Come and get involved.’

In order to support LGBT children it would be sufficient, surely, to teach all pupils, especially those at primary school, the Golden Rule of treating others as you wish to be treated. On an individual basis a tiny minority of youngsters may need specific support.

Instead, Educate & Celebrate, with government and Ofsted backing, has opened a Pandora’s Box. Through being encouraged to question their gender identity, many children are being left confused and unhappy.

Worse, the LGBT programme is biased and one-sided. It is open to a legal challenge on the grounds that it fails to respect the ‘British Values’ requirement to teach the point of view of people with whom one may disagree.

Nowhere in the Educate & Celebrate programme, for example, do I see any recognition of key questions such as these that have emerged from that Pandora’s Box of political correctness:

For example why, throughout history and across all societies, has marriage between a man and a woman been normative, considered right and to be in the best interests of children? What are the spiritual values and theological thinking that underlie the declaration of homosexual acts as sinful in the Roman Catholic catechism, and as contrary to Judaic law by Orthodox Jews?

Important questions such as these are the other side of the LGBT debate. If schools choose to teach the LGBT agenda, they are morally and legally obliged to teach the whole story and not just part of it.