Wednesday, December 1, 2021
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Little people, you WILL believe in Net Zero

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THE Behavioural Insights Team (BIT) have a busy remainder of the year ahead of them. The government’s ‘Nudge Unit’, whose chief executive Professor David Halpern and director Hugo Harper sit on Sage sub-group SPI-B, are about to embark on a psyops campaign to manipulate the populace into decarbonising their lifestyles: a project to run concurrent with their autumn and winter attack on ‘potential superspreaders’ – the unvaccinated people earmarked for blame for the re-introduction of any public health interventions in the coming months.

Their latest report titled ‘The Power of TV: Nudging Viewers to Decarbonise their Lifestyles’ (November 1, available to download here) marks the beginning of the part-Cabinet-Office-owned group’s attempt to begin prodding the nation toward the mirage of Net Zero, changing how they travel, what they eat, and how they power and heat their homes. 

It appears that BIT’s and SPI-B’s collective objective this winter is to herd us in the direction of some fantasy environmental pilgrimage site, and have us simultaneously construct Johnson’s equally chimeric (zero) Covid-19 roadmap as we go; all the while trampling our morals and ethics underfoot, self-flagellating with useless mandates and burying the dead under the tarmac of two impossible agendas engineered finally to rid us fake penitents of all sovereignty.

Crawling along beside us in stretched Hummers, and zipping overhead in private jets, will be the Secretaries of State (occasionally accompanied by their superiors), behavioural scientists and climate and epidemiological modellers overseeing our progress: noting down our daily statistics between generous mouthfuls of beef and through fugs of cigar smoke.

BIT’s latest report is as dull as ditchwater save for one paragraph, which displays a suspicious departure from the ‘hard-hitting emotional messaging’ terror-tactics of 2020 indicative of a likely two-pronged approach to public coercion this winter: 

‘Fearmongering, guilt-tripping, blaming or preaching can be counter-productive. Broadcasters should avoid fearmongering, guilt-tripping, or preaching if they want to make green content more persuasive. Highlighting a sense of pride, community, and positivity around pro environmental behaviours is generally advised over conveying a sense of guilt or admonishment at what we are not doing . . . focusing on what we can do to make a difference, rather than fixating on what’s going wrong.’

It seems that BIT’s media-centric mission will be to help prolong our continued whipping with the Covid-lash from the rear – as if we were mad cows being steered to the pyre – but with the caveat that now, on the shimmering horizon, instead of Johnson’s cast-iron guarantee of a return to normal life stands Net-Zero-Christ, beckoning us with open arms and beatific countenance into his environmental cult; thus somehow offsetting the psychological broadcast-traumas of Zero-Covid-Satan.  

The ultimate goal of all this pushing and pulling of our sensibilities by external actors such as BIT and SPI-B is to instil in us a total obedience to the State. 

The government’s ‘Integrated Review’ of March this year zones in on both Covid-19 and Net Zero as two of the primary springboards for radical political change by 2030 and beyond: the former discussed very much as the threshold now crossed, from our old lives to the new post-Covid epoch, the latter explored with a disconcerting amount of references to conflict and upheaval:

‘The last decade saw an increase in violent conflict globally. 2016 and 2019 witnessed the highest number of active armed conflicts internationally since 1946. As we make this transition [to Net Zero] oil and gas will remain an important, if diminishing, part of the UK’s energy supply. There will be increased competition for scarce natural resources. To 2030, conflict and instability will remain prevalent. The fact that China is an authoritarian state, with different values to ours, presents challenges for the UK and our allies.’

Some 2,500 years ago the Chinese general and philosopher Sun Tzu wrote in The Art of War: ‘If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles.’

It is beyond any reasonable doubt now that the UK, with its powerhouse allies, is seeking to institutionalise a more authoritarian approach to governance, and in so doing is becoming more like China with every passing month: knowing the enemy, in this instance, by becoming the enemy.

The Behavioural Insights Team – who have offices in Washington, Wellington, Toronto, Sydney and Paris – are facilitating this metamorphosis with their good-cop bad-cop behavioural manipulation campaigns. Covid-19 and Net Zero are one and the same: a two-pronged psyops project designed to purchase public consent to the atrocities of the future by desensitising them to the horrors of the present.

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