Paul T Horgan: Are the police cosying up to Corbyn?

Had Damian Green's computer been found to contain gay pornography, there would have been only a fraction of the current furore. Mr Green would have made a public announcement of his homosexuality, and would have been praised for it. The muted response to allegations about the private activities of Keith Vaz, and the secular canonisation of the traitorous Manning formerly known as Bradley, seem to prove this.

Damian Green remains a red-blooded heterosexual middle-aged male and, in the eyes of the Left, is inherently guilty of possessing many 'intersectional' privileges even before his position as a Conservative Cabinet minister is considered. His current troubles stem from the alleged images found on a laptop he once used.

The computer was confiscated by the police nine years ago during a raid on Green's office in the Palace of Westminster which might have breached Parliamentary privilege. It was part of an official inquiry into the leak of Labour government information concerning immigration.

Green was at the time a member of the Shadow Cabinet. He is now First Secretary of State, second only to Mrs May. If the images were wrong at the time, why wait almost a decade to make the information public? Were the allegations 'stored’ to be used at an opportune moment? If so, the fallout from the alleged antics of Harvey Weinstein certainly provided that opportunity.

Why was this information divulged by a former police officer? Revenge? Had he remained in the service, would he have disclosed this information? The questions continue. Are we to understand that officers are free to disclose any information they choose once they have left the service? A free-for-all declamation of personal information by former officers cannot be in the public interest by any stretch of the imagination. If the police do not have any mechanism for preserving confidentiality in their former officers, these measures need to be introduced swiftly.



Then there is the question of whether the information disclosed is actually accurate? The nature of the reported images has changed from being borderline illegal to being 'thumbnails', essentially miniaturised previews of images. This implies they were never actually sought by Mr Green.

When an image search is performed using a search engine, pages of these thumbnails will be downloaded. It is possible that any questionable images could be the unintended consequences of a reasonable search. Last week, Gyles Brandreth tweeted a picture of a statue, asking followers to guess where it was. I googled 'British Nude Bronze Statue Woman' to try to find it. The images returned were in essence pornography. Once I changed the search term to 'British Nude Bronze Statue Woman Public Space', the correct image was returned in the first row. The other images remained questionable. But, dear reader, believe me, these were not the object of my search. Thumbnail images will remain in my browser's cache. This does not mean I was specifically looking for them.

The police revelations provide a convenient balance to the narrative about the questionable behaviour of some Labour politicians and officials who have been accused of far more serious misdeeds against women than Mr Green has. A second Labour politician has been found dead in an apparent suicide following porn allegations, it has been claimed. Three weeks previously, sacked Welsh Labour minister Carl Sargeant apparently took his own life after sex harassment claims. But all the news is now about Mr Green.

The Government has lost two ministers in as many weeks. At no other time could Mr Green's predicament threaten to bring the administration down.

The revelations of course might also be put down to the strained relations between the police and the Tory government. In the 1980s the police were full-square behind the Conservative government of the day. Mrs Thatcher recognised that putting money into law enforcement was money well spent. She was vindicated when a better-paid and better-equipped police force faced down the miners and printworkers, ushering in a new era in industrial relations.

Times have changed. The Police Federation, the statutory staff association, had the riot act read to it by the then Home Secretary in 2014. Public funding of the Police Federation has come to an end. The person that did all this is now our Prime Minister, and Mr Green is her closest confidant.

There is also the increasing perception that the police are now more concerned to be politically correct than to preserve public order and to protect life, limb and property. While some of the things Katie Hopkins says are unpleasant, the police should be protecting her right to free speech and her audience the right to assemble lawfully to hear her. Recently they failed to do either, letting a mob of thugs decide what constitutes freedom of speech.

Whose side are the police on today? The hard Left have long regarded the police as instruments of capitalism and suppression. Some elements look to their abolition and replacement by a political 'people's militia'. It raises an equally troubling question of whether the current behaviour of the police could their way of ingratiating themselves with the Leader of the Opposition, who has been arrested on at least one occasion.

The police are in the first line of defence of our freedom and safety. We honour those who fall in the line of duty as heroes. To serve in the police is to be part of an honourable profession. Officers earn our respect every time they put on a uniform and run towards danger while we run away. The public duty we rightly celebrate them for should not be tarnished by the behaviour of some former officers or a coterie of what could be described as trade unionists. Ministers should not be stabbed in the back by opportunists who have left the job or those who have a beef with the Prime Minister.

Paul T Horgan

  • sfin

    Your last paragraph is way past its sell by date.

    The police lost the support of the citizenry years ago when its upper echelons became politicised under the Blair regime and the constabulary ceased operating under Peel’s principles of policing (the police are the public and the public are the police) and became an arm of the state.

    With their current obsession with all that interests the liberally, consensual politic class, their total lack of visibility – save to parade a bunch of armed robo-cops when establishment premises are threatened – and their policing of thought instead of actual crime, the public has lost faith.

    We are no longer policed by consent.

    • Bernard from Bucks

      “their total lack of visibility”?
      Oh I don’t think so. You can see them flash their coloured finger nails from a mile off as they get out of their rainbow painted cars.

      • You normally hear them first. Siren blaring out, in the hope (I suspect) to alert the crooks before they arrive.

        • weejonnie✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ ᵃᶜᶜᵒᵘᶰᵗ

          Ahh The Nobby Nobbs and Fred Colon technique.

          • CRSM

            Perhaps we need to find Corporal Carrot!

      • CRSM

        You must live near a city. Out here on the edge of rural Derbyshire, the last time I saw a policeman walk past (and that was only a PCSO) was approx two and a half years ago.

        • Paul Robson

          Err…. no. I live in a rural area like you, so all you get is the occasional blaring siren, but they don’t in my nearest City either (Norwich).

          They did once ; there was a stabbing near Christmas in a HMV store and the day after we saw 3 or 4 pairs of cops patrolling the city. Other than that, nothing.

        • William

          A PCSO and their siblings (Community Protection ‘Officers’, motorway Traffic ‘Officers’ etc.) are not Policemen are they?

          • CRSM

            No, but they are the nearest thing to real police you see on foot round here.

          • William

            Same here and I live in a city. After a religious peaceful ‘incident’, you see the odd pair toting firearms but only for a day or two and then it’s back to normal.

    • Alan Llandrindod Wells

      Fully politicised.

      Ignore burglars.
      Ignore shoplifters
      Avoid No-Go areas like the plague. This to include Romany camps.
      Don’t stop, and search, if they are ethnics, no matter a knife is dangling out of their pockets.
      Stay away from White-Meat getting what it deserves.
      Concentrate on hate crime, no matter how trivial.
      Attend doctrinaire sessions on Sharia Law. It’s coming.

      Bloggers please add to list.

      What use are the police.

      • Ed McA

        Really annoys me when they parade on those rainbow days and yet they are supposed to be impartial re so called hate crime.
        Anyhow, those officers should be prosecuted for releasing information, whether true or false, or else what other private information could be broadcast in future?
        The police force represent a cross section of society so there is good, not so good and bad within their ranks and it always amazes me that when they retire then they’re often snapped up by security firms or, as in this location, postmen. Are all police honest? I think not!

        • CRSM

          And for those that are not honest, the opportunity to ‘make a bit on the side’ is always there.

          • Alan Llandrindod Wells

            Also get a bit on the side.

        • a misplaced modifier

          Are any?

      • shred

        Fiddling crime statistics by re-classifying crimes or ignoring them.
        Refusing to attend threatened crimes until an assault has happened.
        Choosing sunny days to go out with speed cameras.(always slow down on sunny days)
        Only detecting the ‘easy meat’ and ignoring the difficult.
        Refusing to investigate fraud or damage to businesses and advising to sue.
        Turning up to ‘help’ motorists and then sending a large bill to be paid by insurance . (then the premium goes up so just pay them)
        Flying around in helicopters and using the camera to spot nude sunbathers……

      • emma2000

        Don’t forget the time and money spent on investigating dead people! especially some incredible claims by known fantasists. From personal experience, I was a witness, I have watched the police blatantly lie on oath. I don’t trust any now. Blair corrupted politics and everything else he touched including the police.

    • Colonel Mustard

      Most of Peel’s Principles have been abandoned or contravened despite the Home Office still touting them. There should have been questions in Parliament about this long ago but nothing has been raised or properly debated.

      The transition of the police from a civic constabulary to a para-military arm of the state smashing down doors at dawn and monitoring what people say or write has never been properly challenged or debated by the peoples representatives in Parliament. They just repeat the usual clichés and platitudes about a service which has drifted far from its honourable origins.

      • Alan Llandrindod Wells

        Sorry Colonel
        There are idiots out there, who think the police are there to fight crime.

        • CRSM

          Not idiots, simply naive.

      • CRSM

        The police need to remember that they are civilians, not a branch of the military.

      • sfin

        Indeed Colonel – although I prefer the old term ‘force’ (when it was ‘our’ force) rather than the term ‘service’ which, as the term suggests, is provided for us, hoi-polloi, by those from above.

        The evil that was Blairism reverberates to this day.

        • Colonel Mustard

          Yes, agree re ‘force’ vs ‘service’. Have amended my comment accordingly!

  • Owen_Morgan

    The Conservatives should have repealed the hate crimes legislation. That would have compelled the police to address actual crimes, rather than imaginary offences. Unfortunately, Cameron as PM and May as Home Secretary and PM were too busy virtue-signalling to bother to contemplate the implications and consequences of permitting the expression of legitimate opinion (often the statement of rock-solid fact) to be criminalised.

    Chief Constables do tend to love grandstanding and there is nothing new about that. James Anderton in Manchester and Ken Oxford in Merseyside were far too much in love with the sound of their own voices decades ago. All the same, making the PCs PC has been driven by politicians, far readier to listen to pressure groups and to curry favour with the media than to care what the public wants. Careerist Plods, typified by the appalling succession of Commissioners at Scotland Yard, have set a depressing example to subordinates.

    The hate crimes law was always intended to be used to enforce a hierarchy of perpetual victims. The enthusiasm with which the police pursue such cases suggests that they already feel right at home in the People’s Republic of Corbynistan.

    • Ian Walker

      Absolutely. If ‘hate’ has to be addressed somehow (and there are legitimate reasons why it needs it) then it should be considered as part of the motive for a crime, with appropriate sentencing advice. That’s a job for the courts, not the police.

      If it’s not a crime, then it’s shouldn’t be a hate crime. If we criminalise emotions, how long until ‘dislike’, ‘annoyance’ or just ‘general grumpiness’ become a reason to bang someone up?

  • CRSM

    A very sensible article. It seems that very few people realise that your PC will have all manner of thumbnail images (each just a few dozen pixels across) from image searches you might have done. If you have ‘safe search’ disabled then quite innocuous searches can give some very odd results.

    • Paul Robson

      My missus trained a few years back as a nurse, sometimes as part of coursework she would google for an article or image of something ; it wasn’t that unusual to get some ‘interesting’ material with it.

  • logdon

    And as if by magic……

    Didn’t take long, did it?

    http://www.breitbart.com/london/2017/12/04/british-police-warn-bumping-someone-mistletoe-without-consense-rape/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_term=daily&utm_content=links&utm_campaign=20171204

    The ludicrousness continues unabated. Do these dyed in the wool politically correct numpties realise that without public cooperation the police service would be functionless?

    I’m not just talking about those ‘who cooperate with the police in inquiries’ but all of us who go about our business in a lawful manner without the heavy hand of plod breathing down our necks.

    We need a new start. Abandon all of this cultural marxist pretend reality stuff and get back to some semblance of real reality.

    Robert Spencer of Jihad Watch (banned from the UK by Theresa by the way) calls it the Age of Absurdity and he’s dead on the nail.

  • Ravenscar

    In my time, I have been fortunate enough through family and friends to make the acquaintance of one or two good lads who were policemen, one was a very good friend of my brother’s and he attended a good friend of mine’s stag do because I knew his elder brother. Over the years you get to find out stuff, and illegal porn was always a popular thing, if you get my drift and lads always will be lads.

    I cannot like much Mr Damian Green what I really cannot abide is calumniation by hearsay and what ifs. even If, these allegations are true.

    So what?

    The real agenda is something else though, isn’t it?

  • Uusikaupunki

    “Some elements look to their abolition and replacement by a political ‘people’s militia'”.

    Sounds suspiciously like the GDR “peoples Police” aka VoPo doesn’t it?

  • Sean Toddington

    This was down to Blair. The original raid seems to have set a vendetta going between elements of the police and some Tories – for example the Andrew Mitchell fiasco. Bottom line there is, or was, something off in the police force. Equally there was something very odd going on in Damian Green’s office. Can’t for the life of me see how Corbyn gets into this.

    • Alan Llandrindod Wells

      The Blair disease is still without a remedy, or antidote.
      Cameron, and May, simply spread it.

      • grumpyashell

        Blairite contagion still pervades all the government institutions and quangos,Cameron and May did nothing to control or illiminate the cancer,so the influence still works through the system.
        If they were true conservatives they would have done all in their power to get a conservative narrative in government,but they were not and are not conservatives

        • Vera

          I think Mrs May has been rather busy since she became PM. There are only so many hours in the day whatever your status. The poison of Bliar is so entrenched and widespread it will take decades to clear out. Mrs May is certainly not another Bliar-lite Cameron, thank God.

          • Alan Llandrindod Wells

            Blairite poison will not take decades to clear.
            Thatcher would have cleared it in a year.

          • William

            I think this wise Welshman should stand for office.

          • James60498 .

            Then why has she put Greening in charge of education?

  • Andy

    There is no doubt that the raid on Green’s office was totally illegal. They had no warrant, for the simple reason no Magistrate would have granted one nor been able to do so, and relied on ‘permission’ from the Sergeant at Arms, permission he had no authority to give. Parliament is a Royal Palace and the Police have no authority within its cartilage. One of these retired officers has released some notes he had of what they found on Green’s computer, but that raises the point as to why this officer had these notes. We read in the Sunday Times that the Police retained copies of the computer files when senior officers had ordered these copies destroyed. There are so many illegal acts in all of this one really doesn’t know where to start. But one thing is perfectly clear: Green is guilty of nothing, and if the Police can behave like this towards such a figure what would they do to us ?

    • Would it be OK if I converted this comment into a stand-alone article for Writer Beat?There is no fee; I’m simply trying to add more content diversity for our community and liked whxat you wrote. I’ll be sure to give you complete credit as the author. You can learn more about Writer Beat by checking out my profile or just say “sure” and I’ll handle the rest.

      • Andy

        Do as you please. I think ComWomen own the copyright to that post as they are the ‘publisher’.

        • I’m not interested in cross-posting the article, I’m interested in cross-posting your comment.

  • evad666

    In Labour’s Northern Redoubt the Police have been heavily corrupted by Labour read about the Islamic abuse gangs and the items of evidence “mislaid”.

    • ukfred

      Al;l of that is South Yorkshire Police. A former Conservative Councillor in West Yorkshire told me that there had been a problem in the ward which this councillor represented, and that the problem was caused by youths of Pakistani heritage, although probably born in the UK. The response from the police officer in charge of the affected area was “We have orders from ‘on high’ to leave them be.” All this during the coalition governrnent.

  • Reborn

    “Had Damian Green’s computer been found to contain gay pornography –”
    I’ve yet to see any evidence that it contained pornography of any sort.
    Let alone be told who downloaded it..

    • William

      Was it part of an office network? Shared folders?

  • Kaiser

    what exactly is “borderline illegal porn” we just mean legal right? and as the article rightly alludes a middle aged man allegedly looking at naked ladies causes outrage

    but KV with his KY “allegedly” having a gay three way with eastern european prostitutes , fuelled by coke probably claimed on expenses … sssshhh nothing to see here

    • Vera

      Borderline porn – is that the same as borderline pregnant?

      • Ian Walker

        No, because they use borderline contraceptives

        • Labour_is_bunk

          Is that the same as having a platonic baby from a platonic relationship?

        • Can of Worms

          Same problem coming or going then. 🙂

      • Labour_is_bunk

        Is that similar territory as having a platonic baby from a platonic relationship?

      • William

        No, borderline pregnant is when a woman (at the moment that’s accurate) indulges in a customs post.

        • thumper_the_rabbit

          What do mean, exactly “indulges in [a] post”?

          • William

            You know, has some horizontal refreshment.

  • JB

    Of course they’re cosying up to him. They see the opportunity for even more inflated salaries for top policemen and little criticism of their utter failure to maintain law and order. But then the Tories aren’t much better anyway so I’m not sure why they’re quite so keen on Corbyn when they know May is just as pathetically weak.

    • Dr. Heath

      Earn a large salary, do as little real work as possible, retire early on a large, state-funded pension, then embark on a second career while, if possible, investing in buy-to-let properties. Such are the ambitions of the only family member yet to become a rozzer.

  • Presumably “borderline illegal porn” is similar to “borderline speeding” when you are doing 29mph in a 30mph zone or “borderline drink-driving” when you have 79 milligrams of alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood rather than 80.

    • Ian Walker

      I saw a postman “borderline breaking and entering” a house the other day. Walked right up to the door, bold as brass and in broad daylight. He didn’t go in, but I could tell he wanted to, and there’s no smoke without fire, right?

      • That’s how it goes. Actually, a friend of mine was stopped and breathalysed by the police and was just under the limit. He had to put up with a lecture from the copper as to the dangers of drinking. I think some police would like to be able decide what is a crime regardless of evidence and simply bypass the courts.

        • TheRightToArmBears

          Ten years ago I visited a friend in Oxford.
          Leaving at 11.45pm I drove north up a wide, tree-lined and, I thought, deserted Woodstock Road on a Saturday night. I called home to say I was on my way.
          FLASH!! in my rear-view mirror from an unlit police car.
          I stopped and was interrogated and breathalised by two very agressive policemen, who were desperate to clock up some points for their quota. The breathaliser was a failure for them and so they fined me £30 on the spot for using my mobile.
          I lost all respect for the police as these two would have been far more useful to the citizens of Oxford by keeping order in the High at throwing-out time, rather than stalking me under false in an illegally unlit police car.

    • Colonel Mustard

      The plan is always to reduce the borders. What is disapproved of today will be made illegal tomorrow. That is the direction of travel. There is so much elastic in Blair’s “laws” that they can be stretched, distorted and selectively applied in order to fit the propaganda state’s narrative. The rule of law has become the rule of the politically correct and largely unelected elite.

      • Certainly there is plenty of slack when it comes to things like racial harassment, seemingly it can be an offence if you don’t look at an invader in the correct manner.

    • thumper_the_rabbit

      In 1983 I had 81 mgs in my blood, and disobeyed a ‘No right turn’ at 11.30 on a Monday night in an empty town – a year’s ban and £400 – apparently I shouldn’t have worn a suit.

  • Fubar2

    Look at when the rot started. Common Purpose and the establishment of ACPO. The Blair years.

    • Ian Walker

      Exactly, the problems begin and end with CP

  • Only Me

    The police have infiltrated by the left.. It all started when the ‘officer’ class started coming straight from university and their indoctrination so they are all on the same page as the other public sector workers.
    When they refuse to investigate crimes like burglary and shopping whilst spending all their ‘free’ time on re-painting police cars you know the game is up.
    They are probably far more corrupt than police in other, less developed, countries.

    • Labour_is_bunk

      “crimes like ……shopping”. Freudian slip? Made me smile, anyway.

      The cops must have been overstretched on Black Friday then!

      • Royinsouthwest

        Isn’t shop-lifting simply the only form of shopping that can be undertaken by the huge numbers of people starving to death as a result of the vicious “Tory cuts”?

    • William

      Don’t forget their nail painting.

    • Ned Costello

      I have to say that your your post is absolute drivel from literally the first word to the last, the sort of thing one sees in the comments section of a Daily Mail article headed “Bungling Cops…” Every single point in it is either flat wrong or a gross simplification, and to finish by saying that the British Police are “probably far more corrupt than police in other, less developed, countries’, marks you out as a first-class idiot and all-round fantasist. Seek counselling, urgently.

  • Groan

    I think we have to be honest here, although there are many more Pc Police (tee hee) I think the key animus is the “cuts”. Like all public services which aren’t Whitehall Civil Service Departments the various police forces have seen falls in their budgets. This has meant reductions in workforce. The Coalition and then the Conservative Gov. becomes the “enemy” simply because they have perforce shaken up a whole lot of work practices by limiting the flow of money. Of course Corbyn appears preferable because he promises more money, so as with other public services Corbyn/Labour are quite simply promising to pay for votes. !

  • Let’s not put these people on such an undeserved pedestal. The police long ago gave up on patrolling the streets, and now they’ve given up on the roads as well, delegating the job to a network of useless flashing boxes, half of which are switched off and which, in any case, are incapable of detecting dangerous or drunken driving unless the perpetrator also happens to be speeding.

    Instead, we get ridiculous show-trials of people who said something stupid on Twitter while burglars, muggers, shoplifters and the rest go unchallenged.

    I don’t want to see them replaced with some sort of left wing paramilitary outfit any more than you do, but I’d happily club together with my neighbours to fund some private security for our estate (not to mention rubbish collection) instead of paying Council Tax. In fact the only part I am happy to pay is the tiny proportion that goes to the fire service. The rest is utterly wasted.

    • Labour_is_bunk

      “people who said something stupid on Twitter”. Stupid, that is, to the PC Thought Police (whether actual police or not).

      It may indeed have been something that would look perfectly reasonable to the typical commentator on here.

  • robert everitt

    Come the Corbyn government and his need for a Police State —who you gonna call ?

    • Richard

      Corbyn’s first act as PM should be to award the police a large pay rise. He’ll need them onside when the shops run out of food and the electricity goes off

  • David Kane

    Now that our police have been pansified/diversified and Islamised Hammond and May are planning to cut army numbers by 28,000, neither can add up. There are 23,000 jihadis roaming around the city streets of Britain (says the head of MI5) willing to kill in the name of Islam any non Muslim that wants to celebrate Christmas. According to the 2011 census there are 1.3 million Muslims now living in London and most Islamic experts, like Bernard Lewis or Dr Daniel Pipes, say that of every 100 Muslims 10 to 25% will be jihadists, willing to kill non Muslims in Dar-al -Harb, as all Muslims are commanded to do by the Koran. This figure rockets to more than 50% for all Muslims under 30 in Britain, France and Sweden (read: “2030: Your Children’s Future in Islamic Britain” by David Vincent, Amazon and Kindle). If we take just the lower figure of 10% that makes 130,000 jihadists in London alone plus the 23,000 red carpeted back from Syria with the offer of free council housing and public sector jobs, making 153,000 potential suicide bombers and head choppers living high on the capital’s welfare hog and giving the jihadis a three to one advantage over our now enfeebled British army. For those of you out there tearing your hair out in despair I can only say that this will not be the high water mark of PC insanity, because the Labour Party have plans to finish off the army as a last line of defence against a complete jihad insurgency in London by diversifying the army in the same way as they have pansified our police. If anyone has woken up and found that this was all a terrible nightmare can they please tell me?

    • TheRightToArmBears

      When Muslims are a minority they demand minority rights.
      When Muslims are a majority there are no minority rights.
      Happy countries do not have Muslims.

  • Royinsouthwest

    Some years ago a journalist, I forget his name, described the police as “the para-military wing of the Guardian.” Since then things of got worse. The upper ranks of the police should be purged of politically correct careerists.

  • Malcolm

    There is little doubt that the police service has become more politicised than was the case in days gone by ( when they repeatedly topped the polls of most respected professionals even beating doctors) but the blame for that doesn’t lie with the police themselves but politicians on both sides of the house. The Tories with May as Home Secretary were as guilty as any, it was she who introduced the political post of PCC which added nothing to policing but has added a political, populist layer to its organisation. I guess you reap what you sow. In my view, she picked on the police to burnish her credentials as a tough cookie, knowing that unlike the fire brigade or the civil servants in her own department, they couldn’t hit back through industrial action.

  • Steve

    You can certainly get pornographic results by misadventure.

    Some time ago I wanted to know about “plaster casts” as I was planning to repair the ceiling of my Victorian house and it had fancy plaster-work in coving and ceiling roses.

    So I googled (or perhaps Asked Jeeves it was so long ago) only to encounter the recreational activity of being put in plaster casts – from arms and legs up to full body – not for medical reason but apparently as a form of BDSM.

    Following the dictum “try anything once except incest and country dancing” I suppose I should have a go?

    • James60498 .

      I was trying to find Quarterly Rental dates yesterday.

      You can guess what kind of DATES I came across.

  • MikePage

    “But, dear reader, believe me, these were not the object of my search.
    Thumbnail images will remain in my browser’s cache. This does not mean I
    was specifically looking for them.”

    F- faux moralism. Whither flesh and blood? 2017 and we’re apologising for fancying people?

  • norman’s nonsense

    The answer can be found in the Police’s adherence to Common Purpose doctrine

  • dexey

    If Mr. Green ‘accidentally’ came across the images his browser cache will surely show what question he asked of the browser?
    Anyway, he now has the chance to prove his innocence in court because Mr. Quick has challenged him to “retract his lies’. I t is, however, dangerous for MP’s to go to court – judges often see right through them.