Reader’s Comment: Denial is deceit when it comes to radical Islam

In response to ‘Rebel Priest’ Rev Jules Gomes: Our most vulnerable girls pay sorely for our surrender to the Islamists, paul_parmenter wrote:

Denial is never any solution. It is just another form of lying. I still don't see how this abuse will ever be tackled when there is a culture of such denial that is now cemented in our political, media and even religious elite. The very groups that are notorious for never admitting that they were wrong.

Vigilantism is one of the greatest fears of the ruling elite, but they seem to be actively encouraging it. Otherwise, I don't know where decent people can go with this. Having to lock our daughters in chastity belts before we let them out of the house and encasing them in blast-proof armour before they can attend a pop concert, is not my idea of a "progressive" society.


  • Owen_Morgan

    That is an excellent comment, which I missed before. I’d only add that the police and the judiciary are also in denial. It took a student a matter of seconds to get arrested, some years back, for telling a police officer in Oxford that his horse was gay, but that same officer’s police force took literally years to do anything whatsoever about virtually industrialised rape.

    • UKCitizen

      That’s because the police are no longer public servants and haven’y been for some time now since women and university qualifications became the norm.

      • Hertslass

        “women and university qualifications became the norm”? You mean women have caused this, or degrading ofuniversity qualifications generally, or university qualifications achieved by women?

        Our PPE Oxbridge male graduates have make a stinking mess of this country, including the changing of former polytechnics into universities. What has that to do with the fact that it was Blair who made worthless “degrees” de rigeur? What has it got to do with women, as our Parliament and governments have been man top-heavy for decades?

        • paul parmenter

          Bear in mind that more women than men have the vote (one of the many valuable benefits of their living significantly longer). Which means that it must be women, more than men, who have chosen to make our Parliament and governments man top-heavy. Thus the faults of government have a great deal to do with women and their choices.

          • Hertslass

            First, women no longer live significantly longer then men any more. Those that do are therefore old and may well be too ill or inform to vote.

            Secoond, People can only vote for the choices they are given. If those are predominately male, that is not the voter’s fault

            Please do explain your notion of causality, Possible connection doesn’t equate to causation.

          • paul parmenter

            The age gap is still very much in existence. It has narrowed somewhat, but it is still significant. We are also advised that the elderly are more likely to use their votes than younger age groups. Illness or infirmity are no barrier. My mother is very old and disabled, but votes regularly – by post. My father is disenfranchised now by virtue of being long since dead – my family’s own little example of the gender age gap still at work.

            Secondly, there is nothing stopping anyone from standing as a candidate, or forming a new party. There is now a Womens Equality Party, for example. If you don’t like the candidates, then stand yourself. Or refuse to vote for any of them. Even if the candidates are predominantly male, that still implies that there will be females to vote for – if you believe that being female is the only thing that counts. Just ignore all those useless men paraded in front of you, and vote for the woman. It’s your right and your decision. Don’t come out with hogwash like “It’s not the voter’s fault.” Of course it is the voter’s fault. You vote for a lousy candidate, you get lousy government. So stop doing it.

            Thirdly, if you have a vote, that is directly related to, and indeed a direct cause of, certain people getting elected. Which in my book is about as solid and clear a causation as you can get. Do you see only a “possible connection” between voting for a candidate and getting that candidate as your MP? Is there anything else that might have caused such a disaster to happen? Or is it still “not the voter’s fault”?

          • Hertslass

            “If you don’t like the candidates, then stand yourself”. Yes that’s really going to change things in our FPTP system.

            “You vote for a lousy candidate, you get lousy government. So stop doing it.” Sure, don’t vote and whoever gets in power gets in with an even smaller percentage of popular endorsement. People don’t vote Tory they get Labour. That’s hardly a solution

            Our voting system is at fault. The paucity of candidates is at fault.

        • UKCitizen

          In the context of the story (not that you particularly care about that) women are on average physically weaker than men, despite MSM propaganda and lefty political dogma, so are less likely to intervene in such situations. They are more suited to a police force that is more a n arm of the state acting as social workers and enforcing government diktat on average non-violent citizens.
          Are you denying the power of the feminist lobby in parliament and accross the Western world?
          Who benefits most from socialist policies and the welfare state?
          Politicians of any gender are acutely aware of the female vote as it constitutes 50% of the populace.
          I would also agree that the PPE males being indoctrinated in our universities are completely useless but the are in thrall to the dogma of equality and diversity and womens rights so women don’t need to be in power to have power!

          • Hertslass

            Actually I did care about the context of the story, It is not really up to you to say that I didn’t. I just thought that your statement

            “That’s because the police are no longer public servants and haven’t been for some time now since women and university qualifications became the norm.”

            was so wide and ambiguous that it could mean anything.

            Granted that women are physically weaker, on the whole, than men. But that’s not everything (if you have ever studied martial arts, you would know that).

            Also, feminism is a movement that very many women (including me) dis-associate themselves from. Therefore feminist influence does not extend the influence of women in general, because our aims and our wishes for the world are nowhere near similar.

            Finally, IMO the people who benefit most from socialist policies and the welfare state are !) the socialist leaders, and 2) the lazy and workshy 3) those immigrants who shouldn’t be here in the first place.

  • “Vigilantism is one of the greatest fears of the ruling elite, but they seem to be actively encouraging it.”

    They encourage it because it means they can bequeath more powers to the police and state to tackle it.

  • English Advocate

    In the riots of August 2011 the Metropolitan Police adopted a softly-softly response. When some white guys formed a vigilante group in Enfield, however, the Met sprung into action faster than you could say ‘PC’.

    • guestwho2

      We are constantly informed that the ship of state is about to be wrecked on the rocky shore known as Tory Cuts yet multiple police agencies seem to have unlimited time, manpower and resources to monitor Twitter for 140-character ‘crimes’ and to locate and arrest the offender.

      • And to demand that signs in Sainsburys saying “Feminine care” etc, should be replaced with gender neutral signs.
        Either they’ve forgotten what a real crime is or are scared to get involved, but whatever the reason, their funding could be cut and put towards real policeman who fight real crime that the public at large are most concerned about.

    • Gilbert White

      But those stupid Pakistani men guarding the mosque were easily mowed down by British Blacks!

  • David

    With free speech seriously infringed and even small infringements of the PC though control system drawing vastly OTT reactions from the law, I believe that the police and judiciary have stopped being servants of the people and upholders of the law, as understood by the “man on the Clapham omnibus”, and have now become instruments of the state in suppressing the people. This is an extremely perilous development. Unless this dangerous trend can be reversed I see little but increasing tension and violence ahead.

  • The_Mocking_Turtle

    Denial? Considering that dozens of guilty parties, Muslim and otherwise, are receiving custodial sentences on a regular basis where is the denial? Tarring a minority based on the criminal activities of a small number of its members isn’t just, sensible or measured and is, in fact, more akin to the behaviour of the fundamentalists and fanatics criticised that their opposite.

    • Kaiser

      only its not a small number is it ? how many “men” do you realistically think were involved in the gang rape of 1400 young girls, it certainly isnt just the 20 or so that went to trial

      • The_Mocking_Turtle

        How many? You tell me since you volunteered a nice tidy double-zero number for the victims? Where, may I ask, did the 1,400 figure come from? The police?
        Government? Where? And why, if the identities of the victims are known well enough to count them, haven’t their abusers and attackers been identified and arrested? Truth must triumph over urban myth where matters of such gravity are concerned. Identify, arrest and punish the guilty parties wherever they are and whomever they may be.

        • Kaiser

          you appear to be one of the ones in denial, everyone knows the 1400 number comes from rotherham