In response to Karen Harradine: The black woman demanding American apartheid,

Audre Myers wrote:

They say if you live long enough, you can see history repeating itself.

I was in sixth grade when the State of New York desegregated schools. I remember my mother telling me, as I left to walk to school, ‘If someone is nice to you, you be nice back.’ And they were. And I was. There were no protests, no mobs outside the school. It was the same as any other day with the exception of school buses – at that time, especially in the city, school buses were a very rare thing; you either walked (uphill – both ways! lol) or your folks dropped you off.

And now they tell me they want segregated schools.

Just to let folks know, most HBCU have white students. And Asian. And Hispanic. And any other ethnicity that is interested in the courses being offered.

I may just live long enough to see schools desegregated. Again.

paul parmenter wrote:

I read the whole of the Jemele Hill article. It totally reeks of racism from beginning to end. But because it is that form of racism that portrays blacks as universally talented and heroic but perpetually victimised by whitey, and whites as universally privileged but without merit and able to practise their endemic racism against blacks with impunity, she gets away with it. No white person would ever be able to get a similarly biased but pro-white, anti-black article published in the Atlantic.

And here is a strange thing. I write this as I am watching a game of American college football. I have been watching a number of these games lately. I see team after team composed of a fair mixture of white, off-white, brown and black players. The same with the coaching staff. The same with the cheerleaders and the college bands rousing up the fans. None of these teams are entirely white or black. They all mix in together, they work together as a team; if they didn’t, they would soon be failures. There is no room for racism in these games, and all are treated equally, because they all want to win. Talent gets to the top and gets rewarded, regardless of the colour of the package it comes in. If you are good enough, you get snapped up. If you are not, you get passed over. What is so wrong with this that Jemele Hill thinks it needs to be changed?

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