reading list
books

A BOOK on the impact of new ideologies on European culture and another on the impact of new ideologies on Africa should be relevant for quite a few holiday destinations.

These two that I have recently read have been hugely informative – and challenging. I would love many others to read them too, so I have reviewed both briefly in this one blog. The first book is a longer and more in-depth read, while the second is lighter and easier to read but no less challenging in subject matter.

The Global Sexual Revolution: Destruction of Freedom in the name of freedom by Gabriele Kuby (Lifesite 2015, pp 283) 

The increasingly pervasive influence on Western society today from gender ideology, LGBT demands and now the transgender movement is generating unprecedented threats to our freedom. Add to this the effects of pornography and much of current sex education, combined with attacks on freedom of speech and religion and the advent of identity politics, and we have the central part of the culture wars we are facing today.

Kuby contends that the core of the global cultural revolution is the deliberate confusion of, and assault on, sexual norms. In this excellent book she sets out the background to all this and makes the case for why all those concerned about the deliberate sexualisation of our children, and about protecting conscience rights, free speech and liberty, must stand up to protect our freedoms in these areas.

It is not a light read, and not an easy topic, but Kuby’s book is one of the most informative and eye-opening I have read on this issue and it is thoroughly referenced throughout. She ends on a more hopeful note, but not without challenges for the reader.

Target Africa: Ideological Neocolonialism in the twenty-first century by Obianuju Ekeocha (Ignatius Press 2018 219pp) 

Nigerian human rights activist Obianuju Ekeocha demonstrates in detail how Western governments (which most certainly include our own), billionaires and NGOs are systematically imposing a secular ‘morality’ on Africa that is completely alien to its culture of life and family values. She calls this a new ‘ideological colonialism’ of Africa by a cultural elite in the West.

Ekeocha sets out in detail how this new ‘colonialism’ is built on aid. While some donors have good intentions, others seek to impose an ideology of sexual ‘liberation’, abortion rights, population control, radical feminism and anti-family policies, by tying aid to these ideologies which are antithetical to the inherent morals and beliefs of most Africans. As well as conditioning various forms of aid, international legal situations are used to coerce countries into compliance.

Ekeocha provides plenty of references throughout, but if more were needed on the export of Western values to Africa via ‘aid’, in April this year the UK Government pledged £42million to the world’s two largest abortion providers, Marie Stopes International (MSI) and the International Planned Parenthood Federation, to carry out abortions in developing countries. This is on top of the £163million the UK has already given to MSI over the last five years, which I wrote about here. 

This book is a relatively easy – albeit disturbing – read. Ekeocha has a driving passion to expose the new colonialism and her concern for her fellow Africans, perhaps most of all for unborn African children, shines through. For us Westerners, who believe our aid money is all being put to good use in Africa, this is a must read.

Summer is not over yet – so still time to read these two books!

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