In a new weekend feature, Readers’ Roundup, we’re taking our pick of the funniest, most acerbic and most appreciative comments on Saturday’s posts for you to enjoy.

In response to LAURA PERRINS’s post Fugitive on legal aid makes a mockery of the law, Hybird wrote:

Our whole society appears to be run by people who are quite, quite insane. From the judiciary to the PM they are all completely lacking any common sense. We really do need a revolution to put things right. Instead, people repeatedly vote for more of the same. And that’s even more insane.

WILL JONES was told in no uncertain terms where to put his warning to the Tories: Javid must not replace May – he’s merely more of the same. David wrote:

Any discussion about who, from the existing choice, should be leader is pointless, as there are no conservative leaders within the so-called Conservative Party. The real question is how to bring about sufficient constitutional change to bring true conservatism alive again.

Oliver J.S McMullen agreed:

Why should any genuine conservative concern themselves with who runs the Tory party? This ghastly organisation is, hopefully, in its final long, slow agonising death throes. Any individual, whether it be Javid, Johnson, Rees-Mogg, Raab or whoever, is irredeemably tainted by being a member of this shell of a party. It is terminally divided, un-reformable and will eventually split. Since the entire establishment is rotten and corrupted, I would be more concerned with the formation of a new grass roots movement outside Westminster. What is needed is for power to be refocused elsewhere in new institutions. The question then is how to achieve this.

Others more prepared to debate on Will’s terms were in broad agreement with him over Javid’s unsuitability but were not so keen on his alternative, Boris Johnson. Douglas Milnes wrote:

The main requirement of any politician is that you can trust them. For that reason alone, Boris Johnson is even worse than Theresa May. For all that I think May should never have been allowed in the Cabinet, let alone at the top of it, at least it is fairly clear what she stands for: feminism and Cultural Marxism have always been her ideologies.

I wouldn’t trust Boris Johnson half as far as I could throw him. His record of making up facts to be whatever suited his wandering objectives at the time should keep him out of the Cabinet. Savid Javid, for all he is a loyal follower, is more trustworthy.

The only worthy people in potential position are Jacob Rees-Mogg and Dominic Raab and of the two I much prefer Raab as someone I could trust to follow his beliefs, which are conservative, not Marxist.

JANE KELLY’s blog, Running a store would be OK if it weren’t for those pesky shoppers, hit a nerve – and not just mine. The scene she painted so brilliantly of the dysfunctional-from-the-start John Lewis store in fashionable Oxford won appreciation from SeriouslyChristian who wrote:

Haha – my wife loved this article as she has been fuming the last couple of days over bad service from John Lewis when she wanted to buy a vacuum cleaner but was impeded by an extremely unhelpful shop assistant!

Answers to ANN FARMER’s question, ‘How do you solve a problem like Maria?’ (being Maria Miller, chair of the House of Commons women and equalities select committee who’s just castigated the NHS for not providing the appropriate services for those of changed gender while insisting that there is no threat to single-sex services) came as quick as a flash. But the prize goes to Boiled Frog who wrote:

Some sort of brain transplant would seem to be appropriate for a person who is apparently so deluded that she believes in prioritising folks who want cosmetic surgery on their genitals over surgical intervention for seriously debilitating or life-threatening conditions.

Sorry person-who-needs-a-hip-replacement – you’ll just have to wait because a snowflake (who has Important Feelings) is unhappy with the contents of their underwear . . . better luck next year!

CAMPBELL CAMPBELL-JACK’s post, The ordinary people of Europe demand to be heard, on the growing political discontent across the continent, in which he said that the ‘people’s revolt in every nation in Europe is really a people searching for a voice, a moral voice which expresses their social and cultural concerns and values’, unsurprisingly won plaudits from many readers, summed up by Cassandra:

An excellent description of the state we are in. And yes, the discontents bubbling away under the surface of civility in Britain, as elsewhere, are not going to go away. If there is not a radical change in direction away from regressive progressivism soon, there will be consequences.

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